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VOLUME XIX 



APRIL, 1919 



NUMBER 2 



BULLETIN OF THE 

UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 



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REGISTER, 1918-1919 



Entored at the Post Office at Athens, Ga„ as Secoud Class Matter, August 31, 1905, 
under Act of Congress of July 16th, 1904. Issued Monthly by the Unlrerslty. 

SERIAL NUMBER 296 









ANNOUNCEMENT OF THE 



University of (j e o r £ i 



a 



For the Session of 1919-1920 



With a Register of Officers and Students for 
the Session of 1918-1919. 



Chartered A. D. 1785 



CALENDAR 1919-1920 



June 30, Monday: 
August 2, Saturday: 
September 13: 
September 15: 
September 15-18: 
September 17: 
November 27: 
December 23: 
•January 2: 
-January' 2: 
January 10: 
February 21: 



February 22: 
March 20: 
March 22: 
May 20: 
June 7: 
June 10: 
June 10-12: 
June 11, Friday: 
June 12, Saturday: 
June 13, Sunday: 
June 14, Monday: 



June 15, Tuesday: 



June 16, Wednesday: 



Opening of the Summer School. 

Close of the Summer School. 

Meeting of the Faculty. 

First day of Registration. 

Examinations for Entrance. 

Opening of the First Term. 

Thanksgiving Day. 

Close of the First Term. 

Opening of the Second Term. 

Opening of the Short Courses. 

Birthday of General R. E. Lee. 

Exercises in commemoration of the 119th 
Anniversary of the Demosthenian Society 
and the 100th Anniversary of the Phi 
Kappa Society. 

Washington's Birthday. 

Close of the Second Term. 

Opening of the Third Term. 

Last date for submission of Prize Essays. 

Meeting of the Board of Visitors. 

Annual Session of the Board of Trustees. 

Examinations for entrance. 

4:00 P. M., Military exercises and drill. 

8:30 P. M., Sophomore declamation contest. 

11:00 A. M., Baccalaureate sermon. 

10:30 A. M., Exercises of the undergraduates 
representing the branches of the Univer- 
sity. 

8:30 P. M., Champion debate between the Phi 
Kappa and Demosthenian Societies. 

10:30 A. M., Business meeting of the Alumni 

Society. 
12 M., Oration before the Alumni Society. 
4:30 P. M., Junior orations and delivery of 

Sophomore cup. 

Commencement Day. Close of the 120th 
annual session. 



HISTORICAL 



The University of Georgia was chartered by the General Assembly 
of the State, January 27, 1785. The charter is entitled "An act for 
the more full and complete establishment of a public seat of learn- 
ing in this State," and its preamble, to use the language of .a dis- 
tinguished president of the institution, "would do. honor to. 0, iy 
legislature, and will stand a monument to the wisdom and patriotism 
of those who framed and of those who adopted it." 

The independence of Georgia, as a State, had just been acknowl- 
edged, and, says the preamble, "It should be among the first objects 
of those who wish well to the national prosperity to encourage and 
support the principles of religion and morality, and early to place 
the youth under the forming hand of society, that, by instruction, 
they may be moulded to the love of virtue and good order." 

Founded with the purpose thus indicated, the University was 
possessed only of "an unproductive and, for the most part, unin- 
habited tract of land," and it was not until July 6th, 1801, that 
George Walton, Abraham Baldwin, John Milledge, and Hugh Lawson, 
acting as a committee of the Senatus Academicus, selected the 
historic site on which the parent institution at Athens now stands. 
During that year the University was opened. 

The general scheme of organization and the course of study, after 
the (fashion of the English colleges of that time, provided for the 
single collegiate degree of "Bachelor of Arts." Literature, with 
the so-called disciplinary studies, constituted the entire curriculum. 
For Science, as it is recognized today, no provision was made. 

For more than half a century the history of the University was 
the history of Georgia. Many of those who afterwards added to the 
distinction of the State in peace and in war received their training 
here during this period. 

But no college thus designed could keep pace with the growth 
and diffusion of knowledge. The expanding intelligence of the nine- 
teenth century demanded wider areas of culture and knowledge. 
Science added new fields to human thought. With new knowledge 
came the impelling force which planted scientific and technical 
schools throughout the world. In July, 1862, the Congress of the 
United States granted to each of the States a munificent donation 
of public lands for the purpose of establishing a college in which 
science and its application to agriculture and the mechanic arts 
should be taught. The funds arising from the sale of Georgia's quota 
of the land scrip were transferred by the State to the Trustees of 
the University of Georgia, May, 1872, and the Trustees at once 



UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 5 

established the Georgia State College of Agriculture and the 
Mechanic Arts, as a coordinate department of the institution at 
Athens. In accordance with the act of Congress, the "leading ob- 
ject" in this college is, "without excluding other scientific and 
classical studies, and including military tactics, to teach such 
branches of learning as are related to agriculture and the mechanic 
arts." 

After this step had been taken toward broadening the scope of 
the University's activity, other developments followed rapidly. 

In August, 1867, the Lumpkin Law School, at Athens (incorpora- 
ted 1859), was merged into and became the Law Department of the 
University. In October, 1872, the North Georgia Agricultural Col- 
lege became a department of the University through a contract 
made by the local trustees, and in July, 1873, by arrangement with 
the local trustees of the Georgia Medical College (founded in 1829), 
at Augusta, this institution became the Medical Department of the 
University. 

By the Constitution of Georgia (adopted 1877), the appropriation 
of public funds for education other than "the elementary branches 
of an English education" was permitted to the University only. The 
following institutions have been established by legislative enact- 
ments as departments or "branches" of the University and placed 
under general control of its Board of Trustees. Each is maintained 
in whole or in part by annual appropriations from the State Treas- 
ury. The Georgia School of Technology, at Atlanta, established 
1885; the Georgia Normal and Industrial College for Girls, at Mil- 
iedgeville, established 1889; the Georgia Industrial College for 
Colored Youths, near Savannah, established 1890; the State Normal 
School, near Athens, established 1895; the South Georgia Normal 
College, at Valdosta, established 1906. 

The growth of the University at Athens may be seen from the 
number of departments which have been established there in recent 
years; the School of Pharmacy, established in 19 03; the Summer 
School, authorized by an act of the General Assembly in 1897, and 
put on a permanent foundation by an appropriation of the General 
Assembly in 1904; the School of Forestry, established in 1906 
through the generous aid of Mr. George Foster Peabody; the School 
of Education, established in 1908; the School of Commerce, estab- 
lished in 1912. 

In the summer of 1906, the Legislature established the Georgia 
State College of Agriculture and directed the Governor to appoint 
Trustees charged with its management. At the same session of 
the Legislature an industrial and agricultural school was established 
in each of the eleven congressional districts of the State as a branch 
of this college and under the general supervision of its board of 



6 UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

trustees. These are located at Statesboro, Tifton, Americus, Carroll- 
ton, Monroe, Barnesville, Powder Springs, Madison, Clarkesville, 
Granite Hill, and Cochran. 

By resolution of the Board of Trustees, women will be admitted 
to the College of Agriculture and the Mechanic Arts and to the 
Peabody School of Education, beginning with the session of 1919- 
1920. 



SUPPORT 

The University is supported partly by taxation of the- people of 
the State, partly by the income from federal grants, and partly by 
income from private gifts. 

The federal government has made three grants for the support 
of the College of Agriculture and the Mechanic Arts; the original 
land grant of 1868; the grant of 1887 for the support of agricultural 
experiment stations in connection with the College of Agriculture, 
and the supplementary grant of 1890. 

In 1895 the State appropriated $29,000 for the erection and 
equipment of Science Hall. Since that time it has appropriated 
money for five other buildings, adding greatly to the efficiency of 
the institution. For maintenance the State pays the sum of $60,000 
annually, and has added an annual appropriation of $7,500 for the 
Summer School. In addition, the sum of $60,000 is appropriated 
annually for the maintenance of the State College of Agriculture; 
with $40,000 for Extension Work, and $2,500 for Farmers' Insti- 
tutes; also the sum of $88,109.14 for the year 1918-19, to meet the 
Federal appropriation to Georgia under the terms and provisions of 
the act of Congress, approved May 8th, 1914. 

The most considerable gifts that have come to the University are: 

The original donation of 35,000 acres of public lands by the State. 

The donation of 66 acres of land to the University by Governor 
John Milledge, on which a part of the city of Athens now stands. 

The Moore College building, costing $25,000, the gift of the city 
of Athens. 

The Charles F. McCay fund, available about 19 70, estimated to 
amount ultimately to several million dollars. 

The Charles McDonald Brown fund of $50,000, the gift of Gov- 
ernor Joseph E. Brown, for aid of students. This fund now amounts 
to $205,824.70. 

The William Terrell fund of $20,000 for the support of a chair of 
Agricultural Chemistry. 

The Library building, costing $50,000, the gift of George Foster 
Peabody, of New York. 

The Alumni fund, amounting to nearly $60,000. 



UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 7 

A fund of approximately $30,000, contributed by friends of the 
University (1906) for the purchase of land for enlarging the campus, 
and an equal amount contributed subsequently. 

The Denmark fund of $4,000, given by the late Brantley A, 
Denmark in memory of his son, William Starke Denmark. 

A gift of $25,000 from the city of Athens (1908) for the develop- 
ment of the greater campus. 

A gift of $40,000 from the Peabody Fund, for the erection of a 
building, to be known as the "George Peabody Hall," for the School 
of Education. 

A gift of $12,500 from the Phelps-Stokes Fund, for the permanent 
endowment of a Fellowship. 

A gift of $500 by Dr. M. M. Hull for the establishment of the 
A. L. Hull Scholarship. 

A gift of $6 00 by Mr. Preston Arkwright ('90) for the same 
purpose and under the same conditions as those of the Charles 
McDonald Brown Fund. 

A gift of $1,000 by the family of Mr. Bert Michael (1912) for 
the establishment of a scholarship in the Junior class. 

A gift of $5 00 by Messrs. Eugene Dodd ('93) and Harry Dodd 
('97) for the same purpose and under the same conditions as those 
of the Charles McDonald Brown Fund. 

A gift of $5,200 by Justice Joseph Henry Lumpkin ('75) for the 
establishment of the Joseph Henry Lumpkin Scholarship Fund, for 
the same purpose and under the same conditions as those of the 
Charles McDonald Brown Fund. 

A gift by the Hon. Charles H. Brand of an annual scholarship of 
$150 during his life, with provision for its perpetuity. 

A gift by Mr. F. A. Lipscomb of an annual scholarship of $200, 
with provision for its perpetuity, in honor of his father, who was 
Professor in the University from 1869 until his death in 1873. 



GOVERNMENT 

By act of the General Assembly, approved August 23, 1889, the 
government of the University is vested in a Board of Trustees, 
appointed by the Governor for a term of eight years, and confirmed 
by the Senate. The Board consists of one member from each Con- 
gressional District of the State, four from the State at large, and 
two from the city of Athens; and the following are ex-oflicio mem- 
bers: the Governor of Georgia, the Chairman of the Board of Trus- 
tees of the North Georgia Agricultural College, the Chairman of the 
Board of Trustees of the School of Technology, the President of the 
Board of Directors of the Georgia Normal and Industrial College, the 
President of the Commissioners of the Industrial College for Colored 



8 UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

Youths, 'the Chairman of the Board of Trustees of the College of 
Agriculture, the Chairman of the Board of Trustees of the State 
Normal School, the President of the Board of Directors of the 
Medical College, the President of the Board of Trustees of the South 
Georgia Normal College. 

The immediate control and management of each of the depart- 
ments of the University situated elsewhere than at Athens is en- 
trusted (subject to general control by the University Trustees) to 
a "Local Board" or "Commission," of which the number of members, 
mode of appointment, and terms of office vary. 

The University Trustees meet in stated session on the Thursday 
preceding the Commencement Sunday, and at other times at their 
pleasure. 



The present organization of the Board is as follows: 

HIS EXCELLENCY GOV. HUGH M. DORSEY, Atlanta, 
Ex-officio. 

GEORGE F. GOBER, Marietta, 

From the State at Large Term expires Aug. 13, 1923. 

HENRY D. McDANIEL, Monroe, 

From tho State at Large Term expires Aug. 13, 1925. 

WILLIAM E. SIMMONS, Lawreneeville, 

From the State at Large Term expires Aug. 13, 1919. 

HAMILTON McWHORTER, Athens, 

From the State at Large Term expires Aug. 13, 1921. 

SAMUEL B. ADAMS, Savannah, 

1st Congressional District Term expires Aug. 13, 1921. 

BYRON B. BOWER, Bainbridge, 

2nd Congressional District Term expires Aug. 13, 1921. 

J. E. HAYS, Montezuma, 

3rd Congressional District Term expires Aug. 13, 1921. 

HENRY R. GOETCHIUS, Columbus, 

4ith Congressional District Term expires Aug. 13, 1919. 

•CLARK HOWELL, Atlanta, 

5th Congressional District Term expires Aug. 13, 1919. 

LOYD CLEVELAND, Griffin, 

6th Congressional District Term expires Aug. 13, 1919. 

JOSEPH M. BROWN, Marietta, 

7th Congressional District Term expires Aug. 13, 1925. 

ANDREW J. COBB, Athens, 

8th Congressional District Term expires Aug. 13, 1919. 



UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 9 

HOWARD THOMPSON, Gainesville, 

9th Congressional District Term expires Aug. 13, 1923. 

BOWDRE PHINIZY, Augusta, 

10th Congressional District Term expires Aug. 13, 1923. 

JOHN W. BENNETT, Waycross, 

11th Congressional District Term expires Aug. 13, 1923. 

DUDLEY M. HUGHES, Danville, 

12th Congressional District Term expires Aug. 13, 1919. 

HUGH J. ROWE, Athens, 

Resident Trustee Term expires Aug. 13, 19 23. 

HARRY HODGSON, Athens, 

Resident Trustee Term expires Aug. 23, 1925. 

GEORGE FOSTER PEABODY, New York, Life Trustee, 
By special act of the General Assembly. 

NATHANIEL E. HARRIS, Macon, 

Chairman of the Board of Trustees of the School of Technology, 

Ex-officio. 
THEODORE E. ATKINSON, Newnan, 

President of the Board of Directors of the Georgia Normal and 

Industrial College. Ex-officio. 

PETER W. MELDRIM, Savannah, 

President of the Board of Commissioners of the Industrial 
College for Colored Youths. Ex-officio. 

W. B. McCANTS, Winder, 

President of the Board of Trustees of the North Georgia Agri- 
cultural College. Ex-officio. 

B. S. MILLER, Columbus, 

Chairman of the Board of Trustees of the State Normal School. 
Ex-officio. 

JAMES J. CONNER, Cartersville, 

Chairman of the Board of Trustees of the College of Agricul- 
ture. Ex-officio. 

ENOCH H. CALLAWAY, Augusta, 

President of the Board of Directors of the Medical College. 
Ex-officio. 

WILLIAM E. THOMAS, Valdosta, 

President of the Board of Trustees of the South Georgia Normal 

College. Ex-officio. 

HENRY D. McDANIEL Chairman 

THOMAS W. REED Secretary and Treasurer 

PRUDENTIAL COMMITEE — 

Messrs. McWhorter, Hodgson, Rowe, Cobb. 



10 UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

FINANCE COMMITTEE — 

Messrs. Simmons, Rowe, Bower, Brown, Hayes. 
COMMITTEE ON HONORARY DEGREES — 

Messrs. Adams, Conner, and the Chancellor. 

COMMITTTEE ON BROWN FUND — 

Messrs. McWhorter, Brown, Bennett, Thompson, Cleveland. 
PROPERTY COMMITTEE — 

Messrs. Gober, Hodgson, Cleveland, Phinizy, Atkinson. 
INSURANCE COMMITTEE — 

Messrs. Simmons, McWhorter, Cobb. 
LIBRARY COMMITTEE — 

Messrs. Cleveland, Miller, Hodgson, McCants, Thomas. 



UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 11 

THE UNIVERSITY AT ATHENS 



I. Franklin College. The College of Arts). Chartered 17 85, 

offering the Degree of Bachelor of Arts, and including: 

1. General Courses in the Liberal Arts. 

2. Special Courses. 

II. The Georgia State College of Agriculture and the Mechanic Arts. 

Offering the Degree of Bachelor of Science, and including the 
following: 

(a) In the College of Science and Engineering: 

1. The General Science Course. 

2. The Civil Engineering Course. 

3. The Electrical Engineering Course. 

(b) In the College of Agriculture: 

4. The Full Agricultural Course. 

5. The Forest Engineering Course. 

6. The Veterinary Medicine Course. 

7. The Course in Home Economics. 

8. The One-Year Agricultural Course. 

9. The Winter Course in Agriculture. 

10. The Experiment Station (at Experiment). 

11. The Farmers' Institutes, and Extension Service. 

III. The School of Education. — Offering the Degree of Bachelor of 
Education. 

IV. The School of Commerce. — Offering the Degree of Bachelor of 

Science in Commerce. 

V. The Graduate School. — Offering the following Degrees: 

1. Master of Arts. 

2. Master of Science. 

3. Civil Engineer. 

VI. The Law Department. — Offering the Degree of Bachelor of 

Laws. A three years' course. 

VII. The School of Pharmacy. — Offering the Degree of Graduate 
in Pharmacy. A two years' course. 

VIII. The University Summer School. 

Five Weeks' Session, offering a diploma of graduation and 
courses in 

1. Common School Branches. 

2. Pedagogy and Related Subjects. 

3. High School Studies. 

4. Selected Studies. 

5. College Credit Courses. 

6. Graduate Courses. 



12 UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

THE UNIVERSITY FACULTY 



DAVID CRENSHAW BARROW, LL.D., Chancellor. 
JAMES BEITHOLD BERRY, B.S.F. M.S., 

Professor of Plant Pathology and Forestry. 
HOMER VAN VALKENBURGH BLACK, Ph.D., 

Associate Professor of Chemistry. 
WILLIS HENRY BOCOCK, A.M., LL.D., 

Dean of the Graduate School, and Milledge Professor of Ancient 
Languages. 
WALTER CLINTON BURKHART, D.V.M., 

Junior Professor of Veterinary Medicine. 
ROBERT PRESTON BROOKS, Ph.D., 

DeRenne Professor of Georgia History. 
DUNCAN BURNET, 

Librarian. 
WILLIAM MILLS BURSON, D.V.M., 

Professor of Veterinary Medicine. 
HORACE W. CALDWELL, B.S.A., D.V.M., 

Junior Professor of Veterinary Medicine. 
JAMES WILLIAM CANTRELL, A.B., 

Special Instructor in Physics. 
ANDREW JACKSON COBB, A.B., B.L., 

Lecturer on Constitutional Law and Legal Procedure. 
WILLIAM OLIN COLLINS, B.S.A., 

Instructor in Agricultural Chemistry. 
WALTER GROVER CORNETT, LL.B., 

Adjunct Professor of Law. 
GEORGE ARTHUR CRABB, B.S.A., 

Junior Professor of Agronomy, in charge of Soils. 
MARY E. CRESWELL, 

Director of Home Economics. 
♦WILLIAM ALEXANDER CUNNINGHAM, B.L., 

Instructor in Physical Education. 
URIAH HARROLD DAVENPORT, B.S., 

Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering. 
♦WILLIAM S. DILTS, B.S., 

Instructor in Poultry Husbandry. 
HOWARD DOUGLAS DOZIER, A.M,. 

Associate Professor of Economics. 
♦AUSTIN SOUTHWICK EDWARDS, Ph.D., 

Associate Professor of Psychology. 



♦ In the Government service. 



UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 13 

JOHN RICHARD FAIN, B.S., 

Professor of Agronomy. 
WESLEY CRITZ GEORGE, Ph.D., 

Adjunct Professor of Zoology. 
L. HENRY GORK, Captain Infantry, U. S. A., 

Assistant Professor of Military Science and Tactics. 
ERNEST LEE GRIGGS, (Graduate V. M. I.) 

Associate Professor of Civil Engineering and Drawing. 
LEROY COLLIER HART, B.S.E.E., A.E., 

Professor of Agricultural Engineering. 
HARLOW WILLIAMSON HARVEY, B.S.A., 

Junior Professor of Horticulture. 
CORNELIUS JACOB HEATWOLE, A.M., 

Professor of Education. 
LINVILLE LAURENTINE HENDREN, Ph.D., 

Professor of Physics and Astronomy. 
WILLIAM DAVIS HOOPER, A.M., 

Professor of Latin. 
HOWELL ARTHUR INGHRAM, B.S.C., 

Instructor in Accounting. 
MILTON PRESTON JARNAGIN, B.S.A., 

Professor of Animal Husbandry. 
JOSEPH LUSTRAT, Bach, es Lett., 

Professor of Romance Languages. 
THOMAS HUBBARD McHATTON, D.Sc, 

Professor of Horticulture. 
JOHN HANSON THOMAS McPHERSON, Ph.D.. 

Professor of History and Political Science. 
ROBERT LIGON McWhorter, A.M., 

Adjunct Professor of Latin and Greek. 
HENRY TOWNS MADDUX, A.B., B.S.A., 

Editor, College of Agriculture. 
ROBERT Dj MALTBY, B.S., 

State Supervisor of Vocational Agriculture. 
JOHN MORRIS, A.M., 

Professor of Germanic Languages. 
SYLVANUS MORRIS, B.L., LL.D., 

Dean of the Law Department, and Professor of Law. 
ROBERT EMORY PARK, A.M., Litt.D., 

Professor of English. 
WILLIAM OSCAR PAYNE, A.M., 

Associate Professor of History and Political Science. 
*EARL EWART PEACOCK, M.B.A., 

Instructor in Accounting and Industry. 



* In the Government service. 



14 UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

ERNA E. PROCTOR, 

Junior Professor of Foods and Cookery. 
ROBERT SPENCER POND, Ph.D., 

Adjunct Professor of Mathematics. 
RAFAEL W. RAMIREZ, A.B., 

Adjunct Professor of Romance Languages. 
LOY EDMUND RAST, B.S., 

Junior Professor of Agronomy, in charge of Cotton Industry 
ROSALIE V. RATHBONE, B.S., 

Junior Professor of Textiles and Clothing. 
JOHN MOORE READE, Ph.D., 

Professor of Botany. 
THOMAS WALTER REED, A.M., 

Registrar. 
SANFORD MYRICK SALYER, A.M., 

Associate Professor of English. 
STEADMAN VINCENT SANFORD, A.B., Litt.D., 

Professor of English Language. 
JULIUS EUGENE SEVERIN, D.V.M., 

Junior Professor of Veterinary Medicine. 
LAFAYETTE MILES SHEFFER, B.S., 

Junior Professor of Agricultural Education. 
MAUDE SMITH, 

Instructor in Poultry Husbandry. 
CHARLES MERCER SNELLING, A.M., Sc.D., 

President of Franklin College. Dean of the University, and 
Professor of Mathematics. 
ANDREW McNAIRN SOULE, D.Sc, LL.D., 

President of the College of Agriculture and the Mechanic Arts, 
and Dean of the College of Agriculture. 
ROBERT POWELL STEPHENS, Ph.D., 

Assistant Professor of Mathematics. 
JOSEPH SPENCER STEWART, Ped.D., 

Professor of Secondary Education. 
CHARLES MORTON STRAHAN, C. and M.E., Sc.D., 

Professor of Civil Engineering. 
CHARLES BERT GORTON 9WETLAND, .Ph.G., 

Instructor in Chemistry. 
MILTON BOYCE THWEATT, Captain Infantry, U. S. A., 

Professor of Military Science and Tactics. 
STEPHEN C. UPSON, LL.B., 

Adjunct Professor of Law. 
•ROOSEVELT PRUYN WALKER. M.A., 

Adjunct Professor of English. 



* In the Government service. 



UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 15 

EARLE GEORGE WELCH, B.S.A.E., 

Junior Professor of Agricultural Engineering. 
JOHN TAYLOR WHEELER, B.S., 

Professor of Agricultural Education. 
HENRY CLAY WHITE, Ph.D., Sc.D., D.C.L., LL.D., 

Professor of Chemistry, and Terrell Professor of Agricultural 

Chemistry. 
CECIL NORTON WILDER, B.S.A., 

Instructor in Agricultural Chemistry. 
* GEORGE LIVINGSTON WILLIAMS, A.M., 

Adjunct Professor of Finance. 
ROBERT GUMMING WILSON, Ph.G., 

Professor of Pharmacy. 
JAMES HERBERT WOOD, B.S.A., 

Adjunct Professor of Poultry Husbandry. 
THOMAS JACKSON WOOFTER, A.M., Ph.D., 

Dean of the School of Education, Professor of Philosophy and 
Education. 
WILLIAM ARCHER WORSHAM, JR., A.M., 

Professor of Agricultural Chemistry. 
WILLIAM THOMAS WRIGHT, M.S., 

Adjunct Professor of Physics. 
T. GEORGE YAXIS, B,S., M.S. A., 

Junior Professor of Animal Husbandry. 



THOMAS SCOTT HOLLAND, A.B., 
Tutor in Romance Languages. 



DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURAL EXTENSION 

♦WILLIAM H. ALLEN, B.S., Field Agent in Poultry Clubs. 

tMRS. EDITH M. ANDREWS, District Supervisor of Home Eco- 
nomics. 

THOMAS L. ASBURY, B.S.A., District Supervisor of County Agents. 

ROBERT E. BLACKBURN, B.S.A., 
Field Agent in Horticulture. 

LAURA BLACKSHEAR, Illustrator. 

tBESSIE BOGGESS, Assistant State Supervisor of Home Economics. 

tMRS. E. G. BOND, District Supervisor of Home Economics. 

fESTELLE BOZEMAN, District Supervisor of Home Economics. 

tNEWTON C. BRACKETT, B.S.A., Specialist in Smut Eradication. 

WILLIAM BRADFORD, A.B., M.D., Assistant State Supervisor of 
Agricultural Clubs. 



* In the Government service. 

t In cooperation with the U. S. Department of Agriculture. 



16 UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

fEARL S. BRASHIER, D.V.M., Hog Cholera Specialist. ; 

WILLIAM E. BROACH, B.S.A., Field Agent in Agricultural En- 
gineering. 

fHARRY LOWRANCE BROWN, B.S.A., Scientific Assistant in Ani- 
mal Husbandry. 

tWALTER S. BROWN, B.S.A., District Supervisor of County Agents. 

tCHARLES S. BRYANT, B.S.A., District Supervisor of County 
Agents. 

tAMES PHILANDER CAMPBELLL, B.S.A., Director of Extension. 

LEONIDAS MYERS CARTER, B.S., Junior Professor of Soil Chem- 
istry. 

tROSS RENFROE CHILDS, B.S.A., M.S.A., Scientific Assistant in 
Agronomy. 

tWILLIAM J. CLARKE, Extension Sheep Specialist. 

t GEORGIA CREWS, District Supervisor of Home Economics. 

t GEORGE VIVIAN CUNNINGHAM, Assistant State Supervisor of 
County Agents. 

L. VINCENT DAVIS, B.S.A., Field Agent in Agronomy. 

tLOIS PAULINE DOWDLE, Assistant State Supervisor of Home 
Economics. 

tJAMES ELKANAH DOWNING, Assistant State Supervisor of Pig 
Clubs. 

fHARRISON B. EMERSON, B.S.A., Field Agent in Beef Cattle. 

JOHN WILLIAM FIROR, B.S., Junior Professor of Horticulture. 

tMILTON CLEVELAND GAY, B.S.A., Field Agent in Marketing. 

tJOHN KYRGESS GILES, B.S.A., State Supervisor of Agricultural 
Clubs. 

tROSS McKINNEY GRIDLEY, B.S.A., Field Agent in Animal Hus- 
bandry. 

tRAY C. HARRIS, B.S.A., Field Agent in Farm Drainage. 

t ROBERT P. HOWARD, B.S.A., District Supervisor of County 
Agents. 

*WILLIAM HARVEY HOWELL, B.S.A., Extension Dairy Husband- 
man. 

fDeF. HUNGERFORD, Scientific Assistant in Farm Management. 

f JAMES A. JOHNSON, B.S.A., District Supervisor of County Agents. 

tGUY RUDOLPH JONES, B.S.A., Field Agent in Agricultural En- 
gineering. 

tCHARLES E. KELLOGG, B.S., M.S. A., Assistant Field Agent in 
Beef Cattle. 

tKATIE D. LANIER, District Supervisor of Home Economics. 

DAVID D. LONG, B.S.A., Soil Expert in State Survey. 



t In cooperation with the U. S. Department of Agriculture . 
MARION WAYNE LOWRY, B.S.A., M.A., Junior Professor of Soil 
Chemistry. 



UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 17 

+ LEO H. MARLETT, B.S.A., Field Agent in Cheese Factories. 

CHARLES A. MARTIN, B.S.A.. Field Agent in Animal Husbandry. 

MRS. LEILA R. MIZE, District Supervisor of Home Economics. 

t SAMUEL E. McCLENDON, Field Agent in Horticulture. 

EVA L. McGEE, Field Agent in Dairying. 

tWALKER R. NISBET, B.S.. Assistant Field Agent in Beef Cattle. 

fJAMES G. OLIVER, Assistant State Supervisor of County Agents. 

tJAMES VERNON PHILLIPS, B.S., Senior Drainage Engineer. 

tCHARLES A. PYLE, D.V.M., Field Veterinarian. 

tELMO RAGSDALE, B.S.A., District Supervisor of County Agents. 

tGERALD ROSCOE SKINNER. B.S.A., Scientific Assistant in Dairy 
Husbandry. 

WILLIAM ALEXANDER SMITH, Field Agent in Bee Husbandry. 

tSILAS HENRY STARR. B.S.A.,, Junior Professor of Farm Manage- 
ment. 

tE. R. STRAHAN, B.S.A., District Supervisor of County Agents. 

PAUL TABOR, B.S.A., Field Agent in Agronomy. 

fCARL WALLACE, Extension Service Husbandman. 

FRANK WARD, B.S.A., Field Agent in Cotton Industry. 

*EDISON COLLINS WESTBROOK, B.S.A. , Field Agent in Agron- 
omy. 

tROBERT FRED WHELCHEL, B.S.A., Supervisor of Extension 
Schools. 

tMRS. HOYLE S. WILSON. District Supervisor of Home Economics. 

tMRS. BESSIE STANLEY WOODS, Assistant State Supervisor of 
Home Economics. 

tLOUIS A. ZIMM, B.S., M.F.. Extension Forester. 

Student Assistants 
JOHN WILLIAM ABNEY. Commerce. 
THOMAS MEINTZER NEIBLING. Civil Engineering. 
SHAN CHUAN WANG, Botany. 



Library Staff 

ANNIE CARLTON, Reference Librarian. 
ETHEL K. MILLER, Cataloguer. 

■ , Assistant. 

WALLACE P. ZACHRY, Student Assistant. 
ROBERT D. O'CALLAGHAN. Student Assistant. 
J. GASTON GAY, Student Assistant. 
CHARLES SANFORD, Student Assistant. 



* In the Government service. 

t In cooperation with the U. S. Department of Agriculture. 



18 UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

Other Officers 

SARA COBB BAXTER, Secretary to the Chancellor. 

JULIUS TOWNSEND DUDLEY, Secretary to the President of Frank- 
lin College. 

ETHEL REESE, Secretary to the President of the College of Agri- 
culture and the Mechanic Arts. 

NELLE M. REESE, Librarian, College of Agriculture. 

PHARES OBADIAH VANATTER, Superintendent of Field Experi- 
ments. 

AMBROSE PENN WINSTON, Foreman of the College Farm. 

CHARLES B. SWEET, Superintendent of College Greenhouse and 
Grounds. 

S, R. KIRK, Foreman of Forge Shop. 



UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 19 

FACULTY COMMITTEES, 1919-1920 



Absences: Park, Salyer, McWhorter, Dozier, Thweatt. 

Alumni Bulletin: Strahan, S. Morris, McWhorter. 

Alumni Catalogue: Reed, Stewart, Payne, Worsham. 

Alumni Position: Woofter, Park, Stewart, Jarnagin. 

Athletics: J. Morris, Jarnagin, Hendren, Worsham. 

Bulletin: Brooks, Sanford, Maddux, Worsham. 

Chapter Houses and Dormitories: Park, Strahan, Lustrat, Snelling. 

Courses as Given: Snelling, Soule, Hendren. 

Curriculum: McPherson, Hooper, Bocock, White, Snelling, Woof- 
ter, Soule, J. Morris, Fain, Hendren, Creswell. 

Delinquent Students: Snelling, Soule, Bocock, Park, Strahan, J. 
Morris, Fain, Payne. 

Entrance Examinations and Accredited Schools: Hooper, Stewart, 
Fain, Stephens. 

Extension: Soule, Stewart, J. Phil Campbell, Hendren. 

Forms and Ceremonies: S. Morris, McHatton, Sanford. 

Graduate Courses: Bocock, Fain, Park, Lustrat, Snelling, Soule, 
McPherson. 

Grounds and Buildings: Griggs, McHatton. 

Gymnasium: Sanford, Snelling, Worsham, Payne, Jarnagin. 

Items: Stewart, Reed, Maddux, Sanford, Brooks. 

Library: Burnet, Reade, Brooks, Reed. 

Medical Department: White, Jarnagin, Wilson, Lustrat, Hendren, 
Reade. 

Night Meetings: Stewart, Brooks, Sanford. 

Promotion and Publicity: Stewart, Davenport, Maddux, Reed. 

Publications: Park, Sanford, Maddux, Brooks. 

Register and Announcement: Hooper, Stewart, Wilson, Stephens, 
Maddux. 

Rhodes Scholarship: Bocock, Brooks. 

Schedule: Lustrat, Stephens, Fain, Sanford. 

Self Help: F'ain, Stephens, Snelling, Park, Sanford. 

Social Life of Students: Park, Worsham, Sanford, Snelling. 

Summer Term: Pond, Woofter, Hendren, Fain. 

Registrar: Reed. 

Secretary: Hooper. 

Faculty Chairman of Athletics: Sanford. 



20 UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

BUILDINGS AND GROUNDS 



The University Campus comprises an area of 132 acres located 
in the heart of the city of Athens. In addition to this and contiguous 
to it lies the University Farm, extending from Lumpkin Street to 
the Oconee River, comprising 830 acres. 

The buildings on the University Campus are: 

1. Old College (1801, remodeled 19 08). Dormitory, accommo- 
dating fifty students. 

2. Road Laboratory (formerly Philosophical Hall, 1807). Road 
Extension Laboratory. 

3. New College (1823, rebuilt in 1832, after destruction by fire). 
Dormitory, accommodating seventy students. The first floor is occu- 
pied by the Armory and the offices of the Commandant of Cadets 

4. Demosthenian Hall (1824). The Demosthenian Literary So- 
ciety. 

5. The Chapel (1831). Used for morning prayers and also as an 
assembly hall. 

6. Phi Kappa Hall (1834). The Phi Kappa Literary Society. 

7. Moore College (1874). The Schools of Physics, Civil Engin- 
eering, and Electrical Engineering. 

8. Denmark Hall (1901). Cooperative Dining Hall, accommodat- 
ing two hundred students. 

9. Candler Hall (1901). Dormitory, accommodating eighty-four 
students. 

10. Academic Building. Remodeled (1904) by combining the 
old Library (1859) with the Ivy Building (1831). Administrative 
offices, and the Schools of Mathematics, Greek, Latin, History, Eng- 
lish, English Language, Germanic Languages, Romance Languages, 
and Law. 

12. Ten-ell Hall (1904). Built to replace "Science Hall," totally 
destroyed by fire in 1903. Named in honor of Dr. William Ter- 
rell, of Hancock County, Georgia, who, in 1854, endowed the pro- 
fessorship of Agricultural Chemistry in the University. The Schools 
of Chemistry and Pharmacy. 

13. LeConte Hall (1905). Named in honor of Dr. John LeConte, 
Professor of Physics, 184 6-1855, and Dr. Joseph LeConte, Professor 
of Geology, 1852-1856. The Schools of Biology and Botany. 

14. Crawford W. Long Infirmary (1907, enlarged 1914 and 
1916). Named in honor of Dr. Crawford W. Long, of the class of 
1835, the discoverer of anesthesia. 

15. The New Agricultural Hall (1907). The State College of 
Agriculture. 

1 6 . Farm Mechanics Laboratoi'y (1912). 



UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 21 

17. George Peabody Hall (1913). The School of Education. 

18. Veterinary Hospital (1915). 

19. The Octagon (1916). General assembly hall. 

20. The Lumpkin Law School Building (acquired 1919). 

EQUIPMENT 

The Chemical Laboratories are in Terrell Hall. There are five main labora- 
tories with an aggregate of 278 individual desks and lockers, assigned to 
General, Organic and Physical Chemistry and Qualitative and Quanti- 
tative Analysis; three smaller laboratories for advanced work; an assay 
room; balance rooms; stock rooms; a departmental library and reading 
room, furnished with current chemical journals; four lecture rooms, (seat- 
ing capacities of 150, SO, SO and 32) and offices of the instructors. The build- 
ing is steam-heated and the laboratories are well lighted and ventilated and 
equipped with water, gas, electricity and fume closets. A sufficient and appro- 
priate stock of apparatus and chemicals for student and demonstration uses 
is annually replenished. 

The Physical Laboratories are located in Moore College. The laboratories for 
beginners are on the first floor, and consist of two rooms, 35x35 feet each, with 
desks and tables for thirty students. The equipment of these laboratories has 
been greatly increased by the recent purchase of modern apparatus for experi- 
mental work in Mechanics. Sound, Heat, and Light. The laboratory for electri- 
cal measurements is on the first floor, and is 20x45 feet. It is supplied with 
alternating and three-phase. 60-cycle, 120-volt currents from the city mains, 
and with alternating and direct currents from dynamos and storage batteries. 
The equipment of this laboratory is modern. Two rooms, 35x35 and 20x35, 
respectively, are well filled with illustrative and experimental apparatus. Two 
large lecture rooms, with seating capacities for forty and eighty students, re- 
spectively, are situated on the second floor. All laboratories and lecture rooms 
are supplied with gas, water, and direct, alternating, and polyphase electric 
currents. 

For description of the shops and the Dynamo Laboratory, see Electrical 
Engineering Laboratories, below. 

The Civil Engineering Laboratory, in Moore College, includes a drawing 
room (50x35) accommodating sixty students, instrument room, and model room. 
The stock of models, charts, diagrams, and other illustrative materials is large 
and complete; the engineering instruments are of the most approved makes, 
and include all those necessary for ordinary engineering operations; a large 
Riehle testing machine is in place for testing the strength of materials. 

The Biological (Zoological) Laboratories occupy the basement and first floor 
ofLeConte Hall together with a Museum on the second floor. The lecture room 
is large and conveniently arranged, and is equipped with stereoptieon and large 
collection of slides illustrating most of the lines of work undertaken. There 
are special laboratories for General Zoology, Anatomy. Histology, Physiology, 
and in addition a dark-room and a photographic room equipped with modern 
apparatus for micro-photouraphy. All of these laboratories are supplied with 
the most essential appliances for the work done therein, and the equipment is 
being increased as rapidly as funds will permit. The museum, while not large, 
has been selected with reference to the courses to be illustrated, and is of great 
service in connection with all of these courses. 

The Botanical Laboratories are on the second floor of LeConte Hall. Here 
are provided a general laboratory, well lighted, Commodious, and furnished for 
the work of beginners; a laboratory for Plant Pathology and Bacteriology, 
equipped with culture room, sterilizers, incubator, microtomes, and other spe- 
cial apparatus; a laboratory for Plant Physiology and Photography, which is 



22 UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

a glass house 011 the roof provided "with special physiological npparatus and 
equipped for photo-micrography; an Herbarium; a lecture room, and a small 
store-room. 

The Psychological Laboratory occupies eight rooms on the first floor of 
George Peabody Hall and is equipped with the latest psychological instruments 
for qualitative and quantitative studies of such mental phenomena as the 
senses, the feelings, attention, memory, etc. Every room can be brought into 
connection with every other room by a system of electric wiring. All rooms 
are supplied with alternating electric current and gas. and most of them with 
city water and sinks. One room can be used for a photographic dark-room, 
while two others are devoted especially to research work. 

The Electrical Engineering Laboratories. The Dynamo Laboratory of the 
Electrical Engineering Department is in the basement of the Moore College 
and is equipped with a 10 H. 1*. steam engine and boiler; an S H. P. gas 
engine; a 10 H. P. 220-volt. three-phase electric motor; a 7 1 /-* K. W., double 
current generator; a 5 K. YY\, direct current generator, all belted to a common 
shaft; two Thompson-Houston arc light generators; one Brust arc light gen- 
erator; one Foos "Electric Special" gasoline engine of 4 H. P. output, operating 
a 3 K. W. direct current generator: one 2 H. 1'. 110-volt. three-phase induction 
motor; one 1 H. P. 110 volt, three-phase induction motor; one 1 H. P. gas 
engine; two small experimental dynamos; one small self-exciting alternator; 
one 15 H. P. series, constant potentials, railway motor; 12 chloride accumula- 
tors; a plug switchboard to which all laboratory and lecture desk leads are 
connected; two lamp banks of fifty lamps each; one water cooled Prony Brake 
of 10 H. P. capacity; stationary and portable ammeters, 'voltmeters, and watt- 
meters of various types; one tachometer and several speed counters; two D. C. 
arc lamps; one A. C. flaming arc lamp; water rheostats, resistance frames, etc. 
Three-phase 110- and 220-volt circuits from the city mains are available at 
all times. 

The workshop on the second floor contains wood and metal working lathes, 
rip and cut-saw. milling machine, grindstone, emery wheel, etc.. in addition to 
a full equipment of bench and shop tools for ten men. This machinery is 
driven by a three-phase induction motor from the city mains. 

The water power plants of the Athens Railway and Electric Co.. at Mitchell's 
Bridge and Barnett Shoals, their steam turbine plant and substation in the 
city, their car barn and shop, and the general system of distribution and 
utilization are, through the courtesy of the Superintendent, available for study 
and inspection. 

The Agricultural Laboratories are fully described under the statement of 
the College of Agriculture. 

The Pharmaceutical Laboratories are in Terrell Hall, and are supplied with 
all necessary equipment for giving thorough instruction in Pharmacy. 



UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 23 



THE UNIVERSITY LIBRARY 



The University Library is housed in a handsome building, the gift 
of Mr. George Foster Peabody. The total number of volumes is 
somewhat over forty thousand, many of the older works being of 
considerable historical and antiquarian interest. Especially may be 
mentioned volumes of early American travel, files of early Georgia 
newspapers and of early English and American periodicals. 

The library has had a varied career of over a century. It was 
founded by a resolution of the 27th of November, 1800, ordering the 
purchase of certain books "for the use of the students when not 
engaged in their academical studies;" was the cause of an attempted 
state lottery in 1806; had quarters in "Philosophical Hall" — now 
the Road Laboratory — during 1821-2 3; was largely destroyed in the 
New College fire of 1830; occupied the "Ivy Building" for the next 
thirty years, the "Old Library" for the following forty-five, until in 
1905 the present building was completed. 

As far as funds will allow, the University library attempts to meet 
not only the needs of faculty and students in the various fields of 
instruction and special study, but to build up its collection on the 
broadest cultural basis. About 1,000 volumes are added each year, 
and the library subscribes for a representative list of nearly 200 
periodicals and papers. A number of others are received as gifts. 
The library is a depository for the publications of the United States 
Government and receives by gift the publications of numerous state 
bureaus, learned societies, etc. Its collection of pamphlets numbers 
over fifteen thousand. 

The Dewey Decimal Classification is followed, modified and ampli- 
fied in an attempt to meet modern university needs. The dictionary 
and classified subject catalogues now contain cards for all works 
added in the last ten years, and for practically all modern works 
shelved in the general library. Over fifteen thousand pamphlets are 
classified and available, having either cards, or subject references 
in the dictionary catalogue. Each year bibliographies containing 
some thousands of references to books, periodicals, and pamphlets, 
are prepared on intercollegiate, inter-society and class debates, prize 
and other essays on themes, subjects of current interest, etc. 

Hours of Opening 

Week days, 9:00 A.M. -1:50 P.M.; 3:10-6:30; 7:30-10:30 P.M. 
Sundays, 3:00-6:00 P.M. 



24 UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 



ADMISSION 



Entrance to the University may be secured by two methods: (a) 
by examination, (b) by certificate. 

Entrance by Examination 

1. Examinations are held at the University in June and September 
of each year. These are in writing, and two hours are allowed to 
each unit upon which examination is offered. Examinations will be 
offered in each of the entrance subjects as requested, according to 
a schedule, on June 10, 11, 12, and on September 15, 16, 17, 18. 
All students planning to enter by examination must arrange to be 
present upon these dates, since other dates can be arranged only 
by special action of the faculty. 

Entrance by Certificate 

2. Each applicant for entrance by certificate must remember that 
there are two things required of him. He must have had the work 
required by the University for entrance. He must present a satis- 
factory certificate to that effect. The certificate to be satisfactory 
must have the following qualities: 

a. It must be official. It must be made out and signed by the 
superintendent or principal of the school. 

b. It must be explicit. The University has adopted the uniform 
certificate of the Commission on Accredited Schools of the Associa- 
tion of Colleges and Secondary Schools of the Southern States, 
which is also uniform with that of the North Central Association. 
Diplomas need not be presented. 

3. It must be complete. Many errors occur in the copying of 
school records. Sometimes it happens that the omissions are serious 
enough to prevent a student's entrance. The applicant must remem- 
ber that the University will not credit him with anything not certi- 
fied on his certificate and he must see that the certificate is correct 
before it is sent for credit. Blank certificates are sent to all the 
Georgia Accredited High Schools in time to have the certificates 
filled out before the close of school. This is the time for the grad- 
uate to see that his certificate is on file in the school office. 

d. Certificates will not be accepted which cover less than one 
year's attendance in the school issuing the certificate. Before cer- 
tifying to the work done in his school, the principal should satisfy 
himself of the previous high school training of the pupil, if a part 
was done in another school. Subjects in which an examination has 
been passed for admission to (the school, or for which regular cer- 
tificates from recognized schools were received, may be included in 



UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 2 5 

the certificate, provided the official records from such school or of 
-the examinations are given. Work done in the grammar grades or 
high school reviews of such work cannot count as units of high 
school training. 

By it-he end of March of each year notice will be sent to the prin- 
cipal showing the college standing of all students who are admit- 
ted by certificate to the colleges which have adopted the University 
system. 

e. The certificate should be mailed directly to the University of 
Georgia, care of the Entrance Committee, by the school official 
authorized to sign it. 

f. It must come from an approved source as indicated below. 

CIxASSES OF CERTIFICATES ACCEPTED FOR ENTRANCE TO 

A DEGREE COURSE 

3. The following certificates will be accepted at their face value to 
be estimated in standard unit terms, toward entrance to degree 
courses, and no others will be honored except as provided in later 
paragraphs: 

a. High School Certificates. In Georgia, a certificate which shows 
that the candidate is a graduate of a secondary school which has 
been fully accredited by the University upon the recommendation of 
the Professor of Secondary Education. Graduates of partially ac- 
credited (three-year) schools cannot receive more than twelve units 
credit on certificate. In New York, a Regent's certificate. In 
other states, a certificate from a school that has been accredited 
by the Southern Commission or the North Central Association 
or .from a school which has been accredited by the state university 
of the particular state. An applicant presenting a certificate from 
a school outside the state and no ton the Southern or North Central 
lists must supply the Entrance Committee with official evidence that 
the school is entitled to the certificate privilege at the state univer- 
sity of the state in which the school is located. 

b. Certificates from preparatory schools recognized as above and 
from normal schools of approved standing. 

c. Certificates from College Entrance Examining Boards, such as 
that of the Middle States and Maryland. 

Exceptions in Special Cases 

4. In the School of Pharmacy, from any high school, showing two 
years of work the certificate will be accepted at its face value to- 
wards admission to this School only. 

In the case of a student who has completed at some other college 
a full year of collegiate work, the Entrance Committee will honor 
a high school certificate through that college, even though it is not 
from an accredited school, if it meets the University standards. 



26 UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

CONDITIONS 

5. Entrance conditions in Greek, French, Spanish, and German 
may be made up in the University in classes provideo for that pur- 
pose, provided the applicant submits fourteen units for entrance. No 
other eonditions are provided for. The University maintains no 
preparatory department. Applicants should not come to the Uni- 
versity in September expecting to prepare for entrance. 

UNITS 

6. The requirements for admission are stated in terms of units. 
A unit represents a year's study in any subject in a secondary 

school, constituting approximately a quarter of a full year's work. 
This statement is designed to afford a standard of measurement for 
work done in secondary schools. It takes the four-year high school 
course as a basis and assumes that the length of the school year 
will be approximately thirty-six weeks, that a period is at least forty 
minutes, and that the study is pursued for four or five periods a 
week; but, under ordinary circumstances, a satisfactory year's work 
in any subject cannot be accomplished in less than one hundred 
and twenty sixty-minute hours, or their equivalent. Schools organ- 
ized on a different basis can, nevertheless, estimate their work in 
terms of this unit. Less than forty minutes for recitations will re- 
duce the unit value. The subject may cover more than one year 
according to the pleasure of the teacher in arranging courses. The 
time element counts on the certificate as well as the quantity of 
work. As a general rule, four units a year is as much as the aver- 
age pupil can prepare adequately. Two hours in manual training 
or other laboratory or industrial work are equivalent to one hour 
in the class room. 

Units Recognized by the University 

7. Each subject named below is valued at a specific number of 
units if the proper time has been devoted to its preparation, but 
its value cannot rise above that number of units although additional 
time may have been given to it. 

English 1, 2, 3, or 4 units 

American History or American History and Civil Government 1 unit 
Ancient History (Greek and Roman) and Medieval History 

to 814 A. D 1 unit 

Medieval and Modern History from 814 A.D. to the present 1 unit 

(For the present, General History may be counted as 

a unit, but not in addition to Ancient or Medieval and 

Modern History). 

English History 1 unit 

Algebra (to quadratics) 1 unit 

Algebra (quadratics and beyond) ^ or 1 unit 

Geometry (Plane) 1 unit 

Geometry (Solid) i£ unit 



UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 27 



• 



Trigonometry V 2 unit 

Latin 1, 2, 3, or 4 units 

Greek 1, 2 or 3 units 

German 1 or 2 units 

French 1 or 2 units 

Spanish 1 or 2 units 

(Not less than one unit of any foreign language will be accepted). 

G-eneral Science 1 unit 

Physics x k or 1 unit 

Chemistry 1 unit 

Physical Geography y 2 or 1 unit 

Zoology M$ or 1 unit 

Botany y 2 or 1 unit 

Physical Geography y 2 or 1 unit 

7 .y, sl ° og ^ ( For the present any two of these may be 

Botany S counted together as 1 unit 

Biology 1 unit 

Agriculture 1 to 3 units 

Free-hand Drawing } The Entrance Committee may, after 
Manual Training investigating each claim, grant a 

Commercial Subjects ) total credit not exceeding 3 units 



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UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 29 

ENTRANCE WITH ADVANCED STANDING 

8. Students entering from another college or university must pre- 
sent (1) a letter of honorable dismissal; (2) an official and full 
statement of the ccollege work already accomplished, accompanying 
the same with a marked catalogue of the institution in which it was 
done; (3) an official certificate satisfying the entrance requirements 
of the college or department of the University which the student 
may wish to enter. The Entrance Committee can not take the fact 
that a student was admitted to some other college as sufficient 
ground for admitting him to courses here. In asking for his college 
record, therefore, he should also ask for a copy of his entrance units. 

9. In case credit is desired in drawing, etc., plates and drawings 
must be submitted before the amount of credit can be determined. 

10. Such advanced students must enter the University not later 
than the beginning of the Senior year. In determining their posi- 
tion in the University, however, the value of the work done at such 
college as well as the work offered for entrance at that college, will 
be measured by University standards. 

11. Work from academies or other secondary schools will not be 
acceepted beyond the beginning of the Freshman class without exam- 
ination. Drawings, laboratory note-books, etc., where a necessary 
part of the school work for advanced credit, must also be submitted. 
When the school is officially accredited for one or two years of Junior 
college work certificates will be accepted. 

12. Work offered in fulfillment of the entrance requirements may 
not be counted for advanced standing. A student admitted to ad- 
vanced standing with a low record at previous institutions or who 
fails to maintain his advanced work may be required to repeat a 
course in the discretion of the professor. 

SPECIAL. STUDENTS 

13. Sometimes a person of mature years, not a candidate for a de- 
gree, but with a definite aim or for purposes of general culture, de- 
sires to take a course in the University without meeting the full en- 
trance requirements. Such special students may be admitted under 
the following conditions: (a) they must be not less than twenty years 
of age; (b) they must give evidence of adequate preparation for 
the courses sought, to the individual professors in charge; (c) their 
names are printed separately in the catalogue. Students not less 
than eighteen years of age may be accepted as special students in 
the School of Forestry, upon the recommendation of the professor 
in charge. 

14. An application for admission as a special student should be ad- 
dressed to the Entrance Committee. It should state (1) the appli- 
cant's age, (2) his preparation, C3) a brief outline of the course or 



30 UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

courses he wishes to pursue, (4) and the consent of the departments 
in which he wishes to register. 

15. Should a student admitted as a special student become a can- 
didate for a degree, he will be required to satisfy the full fourteen 
units of entrance requirement. 

SHORT COURSES 

16. Students taking the short courses in Agriculture, Horticul- 
ture, and Dairying are exempt from the entrance requirements. 

These courses include the one-year Agricultural course, the short 
Cotton School course, and similar courses, that may be offered from 
time to time. 

ADMISSION TO THE GRADUATE SCHOOL 

17. Admission to the Graduate School is granted to graduates of 
colleges of good standing. Other persons of suitable age and attain- 
ments may also be admitted by special permission of the Committee 
on Graduate Courses. Admission to the Graduate School does not 
imply admission to candidacy for a degree. Application for admis- 
sion should be made by correspondence or at the office of the Dean. 

A student who is any wise doubtful as to his eligibility for admis- 
sion to the Graduate School, previous to his coming to Athens, should 
correspond with the Dean of the Graduate School. Full details 
should be forwarded of the candidate's previous course of study, in- 
cluding a catalogue of the institution in which the under-graduate 
work was done. 

METHODS OF ENTRANCE 

18. Note. All applicants must have been successfully vaccinated 
or must be vaccinated before they register. 

19. Entrance Following Examination. Those who plan to enter 
by examination will receive entrance cards from the Entrance Com- 
mittee in the Faculty Room, Academic Building, as soon they have 
made the necessary units. 

20. Entrance in Advance. Applicants planning to enter by cer- 
tificate will be saved much trouble and annoyance and possibly delay 
by having their certificates mailed by the principal of the school in 
advance to the Entrance Committee as soon as they have decided 
to make application. All preliminary adjustments can be made by 
correspondence, at the close of which the successful applicant will 
need merely to present his entrance card to the Dean of the College 
or department in which he wishes to enroll. 

21. Entrance on Registration Days. All new students, whether 
they have filed certificates or wish to take the examinations, will 
report to the Entrance Committee in the Faculty Room, Academic 
Building. As soon as the entrance requirements are met, entrance 



UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 31 

cards will be issued, which the applicant will present to the proper 
Dean for registration. Applicants are not admitted on "probation" 
or "trial," or on "the promise of certificates later," or on "diplomas" 
or general "letters of commendation." They must stand the exam- 
inations or submit the official certificates. Applicants from a dis- 
tance should, before coming to the University, await assurance that 
their credentials will be accepted and are sufficient for admission. 

DEFINITIONS OF ENTRANCE UNITS 

22. The following information is published for the benefit of 
school officers, high school teachers and others who desire informa- 
tion regarding the character and extent of work which should con- 
stitute the units that are accepted for admission to the University of 
Georgia. The definitions of units are those that have been recom- 
mended by he Commission on Accredited Schools of the Southern 
States and the North Central Association of Colleges and Secondary 
Schools, and approved by the University, which is a member of the 
Southern Association. These definitions are published for the pur- 
pose of being helpful and suggestive rather than with the object 
of restricting the work- of secondary teachers in any undesirable 
manner. 

ENGLISH 

(3 units, but may be rated at 4 units where exceptionally good 
work is done under best conditions). 

23. Preparation in English has two main objects: (1) command 
of correct and clear English, spoken and written; (2) ability to read 
with accuracy, intelligence, and application. 

The first object requires instruction in grammar and composition. 
English grammar should be reviewed in the secondary school; and 
correct spelling and grammatical accuracy should be rigorously ex- 
acted in connection with all written work during the four years. 
The principles of English composition governing punctuation, the 
use of words, paragraphs, and the different kinds of whole composi- 
tion, including letter-writing, should be thoroughly mastered; and 
practice in composition, oral as well as written, should extend 
throughout the secondary school period. Written exercises may well 
comprise narrative, description, and easy exposition and argument 
based upon simple outlines. It is advisable that subjects for this 
work betaken from the student's personal experience, general knowl- 
edge, and studies other than English, as well as from his reading 
in literature. Finally, special instruction in language and composi- 
tion should be accompanied by concerted effort of teachers in all 
branches to cultivate in the student the habit of using good English 
in his recitations and various exercises, whether oral or written. 



32 UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

For Study, 1915-1919 

24. One book is to be selected from each of the four groups: 

I. Drama. Shakespeare's Julius Caesar, Macbeth, Hamlet. 

II. Poetry. Milton's L'Allegro, II Penseroso, and either Comus, 
or Lycidas; Tennyson's The Coming of Arthur, The Passing of Ar- 
thur, and The Holy Grail. Selections from Wordsworth, Keats, and 
Shelley. 

III. Oratory. Burke's Speech on Conciliation with America; Ma- 
caulay's Speeches on Copyright; and Lincoln's Cooper Union Speech; 
Washington's Farewell Address; Webster's Bunker Hill Oration. 

IV. Essays. Carlyle's Essay on Burns; Selection of Burns' 
Poems; Macaulay's Life of Johnson; Emerson's Essay on Manners. 

For Reading, 1918-1919 

2 5. At least two books are to be selected from each of the five 
groups, except as otherwise provided under Group I. 

I. Classics in Translation. The Old Testament, comprising at 
least the chief narrative episodes in Genesis, Exodus, Joshua, Judges, 
Samuel, Kings, and Daniel, together with the books of Ruth and 
Esther. The Odyssey, with the omission, if desired, of Books I, II, 
III, IV, V, XV, XVI, XVII, Bryant's Translation, The Iliad, with the 
omission, if desired, of Books XI, XII, XIV, XV, XVII, XXI; Bry- 
ant's Translation, complete. The Aeneid. For any selection from 
this group a selection from any other group may be substituted. 

II. Shakespeare. Midsummer Night's Dream; Merchant of Venice; 
As You Like It; Twelfth Night; The Tempest; Romeo and Juliet; 
King John; Richard II; Richard III; Henry V; Coriolanus; Julius 
Caesar, Macbeth, Hamlet, if not chosen for study. 

III. Prose Fiction. Malory's Morte d' Arthur; Bunyan's Pilgrim's 
Progress, Part I; Swift's Gulliver's Travels (voyages to Lilliput and 
to Brodbingnag) ; Defoe's Robinson Crusoe, Part I; Goldsmith's 
Vicar of Wakefield; Scott: any one novel (e. g. Ivanhoe, Quentin 
Durward). Scott's Waverly Novels; Jane Ausin: any one novel; 
Maria Edgeworth's Castle Rackrent, The Absentee; Frances Bur- 
ney's (Madame d'Arblay) Elvina; Dickens: any one novel (e. g. 
A Tale of Two Cities). Thackeray: any one novel (e. g. Henry Es- 
mond). George Eliot: any one novel (e. g. Silas Marner) ; Mrs. 
Gaskell's Cranford; Kingsley's Westward Ho! or Hereward the 
Wake; Reade's The Cloister and the Hearth; Blackmore's Lorna 
Doone; Hughes's Tom Brown's School Days; Stevenson: any one of 
the novels; Cooper: any one novel (e. g. The Spy; The Last of the 
Mohicans). Poe's Selected Tales; Hawthorne: any of the novels 
(e. g. The House of the Seven Gables; The Marble Faun). 

VI. Essays, Biographies, Ete. Addison and Steele's The Sir Roger 
de Coverly Papers, or Selections from Tatler and Spectator; Bos- 
well's Selections from the Life of Johnson; Franklin's Autobiogra- 



UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 33 

phy; Irving's Selections from the Sketch Book, or the Life of Gold- 
smith; Southey's Life of Nelson; Lamb's Selection from the Essays 
of Elia; Lockhart's Selections from the Life of Scott. Thackeray's 
Lectures on Swift, Addison, and Steele (in English Humorists). 
Macaulay: one of the following essays: Lord Clive; Warren Hast- 
ings; Milton; Addison; Goldsmith; Frederic the Great; Madame 
d'Arblay; Trevelyan's Selections from Life of Macaulay; Ruskin's 
Sesame and Lilies, or Selections; Dana's Two Years Before the Mast; 
Lincoln: Selections, including at least the two Inaugurals, the 
Speeches in Independence Hall and at Gettysburg, the Last Public 
Address, and Letter to Horace Greeley; together with a brief memoir 
or estimate of Lincoln; Parkman's The Oregon Trail; Thoreau's 
Walden; Lowell's Selected Essays; Holmes's The Autocrat of the 
Breakfast Table; Stevenson's Inland Voyage and Travels with a 
Donkey; Huxley's Autobiography and Selections from Lay Sermons, 
including the addresses on Improving Natural Knowledge, A Liberal 
Education, and A Piece of Chalk; Essays by Bacon, Lamb, De 
Quincey, Emerson, Hazlitt; A collection of letters by various stand- 
ard writers. 

V. Poetry. Selected poems by Dryden, Gray. Cowper, Burns, 
Collins. Selected Poems by Wordsworth, Keats, Shelley, if not 
chosen for study. Goldsmith's The Traveller, and The Deserted Vil- 
lage; Pope's The Rape of the Lock; A Collection of English and 
Scottish Ballads, as, for example. Robin Hood Ballads, The Battle 
of Otterburne, King Estmere, Young Beichan, Bewick and Grahame. 
Sir Patrick Spens, and a selection from later ballads; Coleridge's 
The Ancient Mariner, Christabel and Kubla Khan; Byron's Childe 
Harold, Canto III; or Childe Harold, Canto IV, and the Prisoner of 
Chillon; Scott's The Lady of the Lake, or Marmion; Macaulay's The 
Lays of Ancient Rome; The Battle of Naseby; The Armada; Ivry; 
Tennyson's The Princess; or Gareth and Lynette, Lancelot and 
Elaine, The Passing of Arthur; Browning's Cavalier Tunes, The Lost 
Leader, How They Brought the Good News from Ghent to Aix, Home 
Thoughts from Abroad, Home Thoughts from the Sea, Incident of 
the French Camp, Herve Riel, Pheidippides, My Last Duchess, Up at 
a Villa — Down in the City, The Italian in England, The Patriot. "De 
Gustibus," The Pied Piper, Instans Tyrannus. Arnold's Sohrab and 
Rustum. and The Forsaken Merman; Selections from American 
Poetry — with special attention to Poe, Lowell, Longfellow and 
Whittier. 

For the completion of the above uniform requirements in English, 
as outlined by the National Conference, three units of credit will be 
allowed; and four units will be granted to those students only who 
after at least four full years have successfully completed an addi- 
tional amount of work equal to one-third of the above requirement?. 



34 UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

HISTORY 

26. a. Ancient History (1 unit). Special attention to Greek and 
Roman history, but including also a short introductory study of the 
more ancient nations and the chief events of the early middle ages 
down to the death of Charles the Great (814 A. D.) 

' ,b. European History from the death of Charles the Great to the 
present time (1 unit). 

//. English History (1 unit). 

e. American History and Civil Government (1 unit). The study 
of a more recent High School text in each and not a Grammar School 
History. 

General History may be counted as a unit, but not in addition to 
ancient or medieval and modern history. 

MATHEMATICS 

27. Algebra to quadratics (1 unit). 
Plane Geometry (1 unit). 

Algebra, quadratics and beyond (V 2 or 1 unit). 
Solid Geometry ( y 2 unit). 
Plane Trigonometry ( y 2 unit). 

LATIN 

2 8. Elementary Latin Book (1 unit). 

Caesar (1 unit). Any four books of the Gallic War, wi-th study 
of the grammar and prose composition based upon the text read. 
Equivalent reading in other standard authors allowed, but not to 
exceed two books. 

Cicero. Any six orations from the following list, but preferably 
the first six mentioned: 

The four orations against Catiline, Archias, the Manilian Law, 
Marcellus, Roscius, Milo, Sestius, the fourteenth Philippic. 

Vergil. The first six books of the Aeneid. 

The equivalent of at least; one period a week in prose composition 
based on Cicero. 

Note: In place of a part of Cicero, an equivalent of Sallust's 
Catiline, and in place of a part of Vergil, an equivalent of Ovid will 
be accepted for the third unit made up of reading from Cicero and 
Vergil. 

GREEK 

29. 1. Introductory Lessons: Xenophon's Anabasis (20 to 30 
pages). 

2. Xenophon's Anabasis (continued), either alone or with other 
attic prose (75 to 120 pages). Practice in reading at sight, system- 
atic study of grammar, thorough grammatical review, and practice 



UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 35 

in writing Greek, both based on study of Books I and II of the 
Anabasis. 

Note: The University entrance requirement for Greek is 1 % 
units: Course 1, outlined above, and three books of the Anabasis. 

Ample provision is made at the University for students whose 
preparation in Greek is deficient. These classes must be taken by 
candidates for the degree of Bachelor of Arts who have had no 
instruction in Greek (unlss German and French are to be substi- 
tuted for Greek) and by students whose preparation has been lack- 
ing in thoroughness and accuracy, before proceeding to the reg- 
ular requirements of the curriculum. Candidates for this degree 
are, therefore , urged to secure before entering college full prepara- 
tion for the regular Freshman class in Greek (Course 1). Summer 
School courses may also be taken to advantage. 

GERMAN 

30. 1. The work of the first year should aim at: (a) Correct pro- 
nunciation; (b) Thorough grounding in the elements of grammar; 

(c) A certain facility in understanding and speaking the language; 

(d) A quantum of accurate translation from German to English. 

In order to attain these ends, we recommend the following 
methods: 

(a) Constant drill in pronunciation by reading aloud in chorus 
or singly. This exercise, reinforced by the oral practice, or collo- 
quium, should never be omitted. 

(b) About fifteen lessons of a modern direct-method book, with 
daily written exercises. 

(c) Carefully worked-out colloquial lessons, following a pre- 
arranged scheme, designed to teach the vocabulary of everyday life. 
To insure spontaneity, it is recommended that no text book appear, 
but that, as far as possible, the objects be pointed out or drawn on 
the board, and careful notes be taken by the pupils under the super- 
vision of the teacher. To insure system, the teacher must follow 
either a method of his own or a method book. We recommend 
Manfred's Ein Praktischer Anfang, Methode Berlitz (Erstes Buch), 
Walter-Krause's Beginner's German, Newson's First German Book. 
The colloquium should also include memorizing of poems and sing- 
ing of songs, and should occupy at least one-third of the time of 
every lesson. 

(d) Daily written translation of a portion of the assignment for 
reading. The first year's text must be made to order, very simple, 
interesting, if possible, and must present a thoroughly practical 
vocabulary; 100 pages will suffice, though more may be read. Sug- 
gestions: Stern's Studien und Plaudereien, Guerber's Marchen und 
Erzahlungen, Allen's Herein. 



36 UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

2. The second unit's work is simply a continuation of the meth- 
ods and exercises recommended for the first year. The grammar 
should be nearly completed, and about 150 pages of short stories 
or narratives of travel in Germany should be translated in the man- 
ner above suggested. Texts recommended: L'Arrabbiata, Germels- 
hausen, Der zerbrochene Krug, Immensee, Stille Wasser, Der Besuch 
im Karzer, Holzwarth's Gruss aus Deutschland, Bacon's Im Vater- 
land, Walter-Krause's First Reader, or any standard graduated 
Reader. 

If these instructions are faithfully followed, it may be hoped 
that the candidate will possess: (a) A correct, fluent pronunciation; 
(b) a genuine knowledge of forms and a thorough grasp of the im- 
portant rules of grammar; (c) a command of a pretty wide vocab- 
ulary of realien; and (d) a real ability, within well-defined limits, 
to understand and speak the language. 

Note: If time can be spared for the purpose, we also strongly 
recommend that the beginner be taught German script; to which end 
copy-books may be employed. 

FRENCH 

31. 1. During the first year the work should comprise: (a) Care- 
ful drill in pronunciation; (b) the rudiments of grammar, including 
the inflection of the regular and the more common irregular verbs, 
the plural of nouns, the inflection of adjectives, participles, and pro- 
nouns; the use of personal pronouns, common adverbs, prepositions, 
and conjunctions; the order of words in the sentence, and the ele- 
mentary rules of syntax; (c) abundant easy exercises, designed not 
only to fix in the memory the forms and principles of grammar, but 
also to cultivate readiness in the reproduction of natural forms of 
expression; (d) the reading of from 100 to 175 duodecimo pa-ges of 
graduated text, with constant practice in translating into French 
easy variations of the sentences read (the teacher giving the Eng- 
lish), and in reproducing from memory sentences previously read; 
(e) writing French from dictation. 

2. During the second year the work should comprise: (a) the 
reading of from 250 to 400 pages of easy modern prose in the form 
of stories, plays, or historical or biographical sketches; (b) constant 
practice, as in the previous year, in translating into French easy 
variations upon the text read; (c) frequent abstracts, sometimes 
oral and sometimes written, of portions of the text already read; 
(d) writing French from dictation; (e) continued drill upon the 
rudiments of grammar, with constant application in the construc- 
tion of sentences; (f) mastery of the forms and use of pronouns, 
pronominal adjectives, of all but the rare irregular verb forms, and 
of the simpler uses of the conditional and subjunctive. 



UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 37 

Suitable texts for the second year are: About's Le Roi des mon- 
tagnes, Bruno's Le Tour de la France, Daudet's easier short tales, 
La Bedollier's La Mere Michel et son chat, Erckmann-Chatrian's 
stories, Foa's Contes biographiques and Le Petit Robinson de Paris, 
Foncin's Le Pays de France, Labiche and Martin's La Poudre aux 
Yeux and Le Voyage de M. Perrichon, Legouve and Labiche's La 
Cigale chez les fourmis, Malot's Sans Famille, Mairet's La Tache du 
petit Pierre, Merimee's Colomba, extracts from Michelet's Sarcery's 
Le Siege de Paris, Verne's stories. 

SPANISH 

3 2. Work similar in amount and character to that outlined above 
for French. 

GENERAL SCIENCE (one unit) 

33. The work of this course should consist of a study of those 
natural phenomena, without respect to any on© of the sub-divisions 
of natural science, which touch most directly upon the student's 
daily life and experience. It should be given in the first year and 
a half of the high school course. 

For a full unit's credit both recitation and individual laboratory 
work should be done. For the recitation work one of the modern 
text-books in General Science should be used, of type and grade of 
Clark's General Science, Eikenberry and Caldwell's General Science, 
or Snyder's First Year Science. For the laboratory work the student 
should be required to make a series of simple observations and ex- 
periments from which he can obtain answers to many of the ques- 
tions which every child puts to himself concerning the things around 
him. A careful record should be kept of all observations and ex- 
periments made, with the conclusions drawn. The laboratory man- 
ual should be of a grade suggested by the above text-books. 

PHYSICS (one unit) 

34. 1. The unit in Physics consists of at least 120 hours of as- 
signed work. Two periods of laboratory work count as one of as- 
signed work. 

2. The work consists of three closely related parts, namely, class 
work, lecture-demonstration work, and laboratory work. At least 
one-fourth of the time should be devoted to laboratory work. 

Note: Where students have the proper training in class work and 
lecture-demonstration, but cannot have access to a laboratory for 
individual experiments, a half unit will be allowed. 

CHEMISTRY (one unit) 

35. The course should consist of at least three recitations and two 
hours of laboratory work weekly throughout the year. 



3 8 UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

PHYSICAL. GEOGRAPHY (one unit). 

36. The equivalent of work as presented in recent texts, with 
about forty laboratory lessons. 

BOTANY (one unit) 

37. The course should be based on one of the modern High 
School text-books. Special emphasis should be laid on the laboratory 
work which should consist of work in both the structure and phys- 
iology of plants. 

PHYSIOLOGY (one-half unit) 

38. The course should be based on one of the modern High School 
text-ibooks. Little importance is attached to laboratory work in 
Anatomy in connection with this course, and on account of the im- 
possibility of offering any real laboratory work in Physiology in 
a High School, none is expected. The teacher should be specially 
careful to see that the student has a real understanding of the action 
of the various organs both individually and in relation to each other, 
rather than the ability to recite pages of a text. 

ZOOLOGY" (one unit, one-half unit) 

39. A study of modern text and laboratory study of ten types for 
one unit, or five types for one-half unit. The study should come host 
in the second year of the high school and should consist of two class- 
room exercises and at least two laboratory double periods. 

AGRICULTURE 

40. To receive college entrance credit, a one year's course should 
consist of three recitation periods and two double laboratory periods 
per week extending through one school year. 

Where one year's work only is offered, the course in Agriculture 
is to be a general course, covering the fundamentals of soil, plants, 
animals, farm management and rural economics. 

COMMERCIAL GEOGRAPHY (one-half unit) 

41. One-half unit devoted to a comparative study of the industry 
and commerce of the leading nations, with emphasis on the industry 
and commerce of the United States. 

MANUAL TRAINING 

4 2. 1. (a) Free Hand Drawing, y 2 to 1 unit. 

(b) Mechanical Drawing, y 2 to iy 2 units (conditioned upon an 
equal amount of Geometry with it). 

(c) Shop work, y 2 to 5 V£ units, approximately distributed as fol- 
lows, and the total accepted from any student being not more than 
twice the value of the Mechanical Drawing accepted from him. 
Benchwork in Wood, y 2 unit, Cabinet work 1 unit, Wood Turning 



UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 39 

% unit, Pattern Making y 2 unit, Forging 1 unit, Machine woTk in 
Metal 1 unit, Foundry work 1 unit. The time required for each unit 
is to be not less than 2 40 sixty minute hours; all Shopwork, except 
Benehwork in Wood, to have periods of not less than sixty minutes 
each. 

2. The colleges accept these units for the present after special 
investigation as to the merits of the work done. 

3. The total accepted may equal one unit for A.B. Courses, or 
three units for B.S. and Engineering Courses. 

BOOKKEEPING AND BUSINESS ARITHMETIC (one unit) 

43. The minimum time for one unit should be 240 hours, of sixty 
minutes. 

No credit should be allowed unless the work is done neatly, accu- 
rately, and at a satisfactory rate of speed. All work should be done 
in the class room under the eye of the instructor. Definitions of 
double entry terms, with rules for debit and credit, kinds and uses 
of books. Conduct of a set including the journal, cash book, sales 
book; closing of books. Single entry set: changing from single to 
double entry. Text-book, with exercises so arranged that no two 
students will do exactly the same work. 

STENOGRAPHY AND TYPEWRITING (one unit) 

44. Shorthand. It is recommended that a minimum of one and 
one-half years be given to the study of Shorthand. Pupils com- 
pleting the course should be able to write in shorthand prose dic- 
tated at the rate of 60 words a minute, and be able to translate the 
notes correctly on the following day. For this one and one-half units 
should be allowed. 

Typewriting. To typewriting one year should be given. If at the 
end of the year the pupil can typewrite without error forty words a 
minute, a credit of one-half a unit should be given. 

Bookkeeping. The course in bookkeeping should be the simple 
form in single and double entry bookkeeping, and should continue 
for one year, for which a credit of one unit should be given. 

Commercial or Business Arithmetic. The course should cover one 
year, for which a credit of not more than one unit should be given. 

BUSINESS LAW (one-half unit) 

45. Text-book supplemented by some study of cases, (by way of 
illustration), discussions and practice in drawing legal papers such 
as abstracts, notes, bill of exchange, bill of sale, bill of lading, power 
of attorney, deed, mortgage, lease, notice of protest, etc. 

ACCREDITED SCHOOLS 

The following constitute the standards with reference to which 
schools are classified: 



40 UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

46. No school shall be fully accredited which does not require for 
graduation the completion of a four-year high school course of study 
embracing' fifteen units as defined by the University. More than 
twenty periods per week of prepared work should be discouraged. 

47. The minimum scholastic attainment of three-fourths of all 
secondary school teachers of academic subjects in any accredited 
school shall be equivalent to graduation from a standard college. 
It is strongly advised that this attainment include, or be supple- 
mented by, special study of the content and pedagogy of the subject 
taught. 

48. The number of daily periods of class-work instruction given 
by any teacher should not exceed six per day; and no school will be 
accredited in which more than seven full recitations per day are 
conducted by any teacher. Superintendents and principals should 
be given sufficient time to visit various grades or departments for 
the purpose of supervision. There should be at least three teachers 
devoting full time to grade work, and at least two teachers who 
devote their entire time to the high school. 

49. The school year should be at least thirty-six weeks in length 
a#d no school will be fully accredited in which the time is limited to 
a shorter period. 

50. The laboratory should be supplied with apparatus, tables, 
water, and other appliances necessary to enable a student to perform 
all required experiments. At least forty minutes a week should be 
devoted to individual laboratory work in each of the sciences offered 
for admission. The laboratory period should be double the length 
of the recitation period, and in physical and biological sciences in- 
cluding agriculture there should be two laboratory periods per 
week. Double periods count for one. 

51. The library should consist of carefully selected books of ref- 
erence and supplementary readings upon the various departments of 
high school work. This library should be located in the most con- 
venient place for use, and a card index prepared for the best results. 

52. The location and construction of the buildings, the lighting, 
heating, and ventilation of the rooms, the nature of the lavatories, 
corridors, water supply, school furniture, apparatus and methods of 
cleaning shall be such as to insure hygienic conditions for both 
pupils and teachers. 

53. The efficiency of instruction, the acquired habits of thought 
and speech, the general intellectual and moral tone of a school are 
paramount .factors and, therefore, only schools that rank well in 
these particulars, as evidenced by rigid, thorough-going, sympathetic 
inspection, shall be considered eligible for the list. 

54. The University will decline to consider any school for full 
credit whose teaching force consists of fewer than three teachers of 



UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 41 

academic subjects giving their full time to high school instruction. 

55. No school shall be considered unless the regular annual blank 
furnished for the purpose shall have been filled out and placed on 
file with the inspector. 

56. All schools whose records show an excessive number of pupils 
per teacher, as based on the average number enrolled, even though 
they may technically meet all other requirements, will be rejected. 
The University recognizes thirty as maximum. 

57. The time for which schools are accredited shall be for one to 
three years. In every case the character of the work done by a 
school must be the determining factor in accrediting. By personal 
visits of the inspector, by detailed reports from the principals, and 
by the records made by the students in colleges, the character of a 
school's work shall be, from time to time, determined. A school 
shall be removed from the accredited list for failure to maintain the 
above standards. 

BOARD AND LODGING 

DORMITORIES 

There are three dormitories, Old College, for Juniors and Seniors; 
New College and Candler Hall for lower classmen. 

58. Rooms in the dormitories are lighted by electricity and are 
furnished with chairs, bed, table, and washstand. The student fur- 
nishes all the other articles and his own fuel. The University gives 
dormitory quarters to students rent free. A charge of $4.00 per 
month per man is made for each room occupied to cover the expenses 
of janitors, water, and lights. This charge is payable in two install- 
ments, $14.00 at the beginning of the session, and $22.00 on Janu- 
ary 1st. A deposit fee of $2.00 is required of every student before 
assignment is made. This fee is a charge against damage to the 
property, and the balance is returned at the end of the year. 

The dormitories are in charge of a committee from the Faculty. 
The rules and regulations prescribed by this committee are enforced 
through Proctors placed over each division of the dormitories. 

Those desiring dormitory rooms should apply in person or by 
letter to Mr. T. W. Reed, Treasurer, Athens, Georgia. No assign- 
ment will be made until the required deposit fee is paid. Applica- 
tions should be made early, as only about two hundred can be 
accommodated. 

DENMARK DINING HALL. 

59. The Hall, which is in charge of a competent matron, and 
under the immediate supervision of a member of the Faculty, fur- 
nishes board on the cooperative plan to more than two hundred stu- 
dents. During the session 1918-19 the cost was $16.00 per month. 



42 UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

Regular financial statements are rendered by the professor in charge, 
and audited by a committee of the students. No reservations are 
made in advance. The students are given seats in the order of ar- 
rival at the Hall and the payment of fees. 

EXPENSES 

60. Residents of Georgia pay no tuition fees except in the Law and 
Pharmacy courses. Students who are residents of other states are 
charged a tuition fee of $50.00 per annum in academic courses, ex- 
cept in Agriculture. A fee of $12.00 is required of all students, to 
cover infirmary (including medical attention), gymnasium, and 
student activities. The following estimate of expenses includes all 
necessary items except clothing and railroad fare: 

61. Expenses of Students when Rooming in a Dormitory and Board- 
ing at Denmark Dialing Hall 

Matriculation fee (paid on entrance), except in Agriculture $ 10.00 

Library fee (paid on entrance), except in Agriculture 5.00 

Initiation fee to literary society (paid on entrance) 2.00 

Board (paid monthly, in advance, $16.00) 144.00 

Books and stationery (estimated) 10.00 

Laundry (estimated at $1.25 per month) 11.25 

Room rent, lights and attendance ($4.00 per month) 36.00 

Deposit fees in Dormitory and Dining Hall 5.00 

Fee for Infirmary, etc 12.00 



$235.25 

Engineering students must have a set of drawing instruments. 

6 2. A student, the first year, can scarcely meet his necessary 
expense on less than $250 for the scholastic year; usually it will 
exceed this amount. 

Note: In order to meet all the necessary expenses of registration, 
books, uniform and other expenditures incident to securing a room 
and board, a student should come prepared to expend about fifty 
or sixty dollars during the first ten days. After that period his board 
and room rent will constitute the major part of his expenses. 

63. Students in the one-year Agricultural Course, the Winter 
Course, and the full Agricultural Course are exempt from matricula- 
tion and library fees. 

The figures given above are for the first year. They are based 
upon the actual experiences of students. Expenses can be brought 
under the estimate by strict economy. Second-hand books can be 
purchased at the Cooperative Store, and elsewhere. In these and 
other ways money can be saved. 



UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 43 

SPECIAL. FEES 

64. Special fees, sufficient to cover the material consumed, are 
attached to the following courses: 

Chemistry 1, 2, 3, 5, 6, 7 $ 2.50 

Chemistry 8, 9 10.00 

Zoology 2.50 

Physical Laboratory 2.50 

Botany 1, 2, 3a, 4 2 5Q 

Botany 5, 6, 9 3.50 

PRIVATE BOARD AND LODGLNG 

65. The charges for private rooms vary with the character of the 
furnishings, from $5.00 to $12.00 a month for two occupants. This 
is a very popular way of lodging. The students board at the Den- 
mark Dining Hall, or they can secure private table board for $3.00 
to $6.00 a week. A number of families in the city offer board and 
lodging at from $15.00 to $27.50 a month. The University cannot 
agree to engage rooms in private families. A list of those desiring 
boarders or having furnished rooms to rent, will be given on appli- 
cation, but the student must make his own arrangements. 

The officers of the University Y. M. C. A. also render every assist- 
ance possible to those desiring advice and help in such matters. 
There need be no anxiety, therefore, in regard to securing accom- 
modations. 

INCIDENTAL EXPENSES 

66. The incidental expenses of a student are what he makes them, 
and parents are urged- to take into their own hands the control of a 
matter which no college regulation can successfully reach. 

SCHOLARSHIPS 

Charles McDonald Brown Scholarship Fund 

67. This endowment was established in 1881, by the Hon. Joseph 
E. Brown, ex-Governor of Georgia, in memory of his son, of the class 
of 1878, for the purpose of aiding young men in defraying the 
expenses of their education. The interest on this fund is lent to 
worthy young men on condition that they obligate themselves to 
return it with four per cent interest. Young men who enter the 
ministry are required to return but one-half of the amount borrowed, 
with interest. 

The colleges participating in the benefits of this fund are: the 
colleges at Athens, (including the Law Department), the Medical 
College at Augusta, and the North Georgia Agricultural College at 
Dahlonega. 

A special circular of information concerning the fund and blank 
forms of application will be supplied on request. Applications for 



44 UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

loans from this fund must be made on these forms and must be in 
the hands of the Chancellor by April 1st. The grants are made in 
June by the Board of Trustees. Only $100.00 a year, in nine 
monthly installments, is allowed a borrowing student. 

68. The Honor Graduate of an Accredited High School, on pre- 
sentation of an official certificate by the Principal, is awarded a 
scholarship at the University for one year in the Academic courses. 
This exempts him from the payment of matriculation fees. 

69. The Hodgson Scholarship. One hundred dollars per year for 
ten years (expiring in 1918), given by the Empire State Chemical 
Company, to be lent on the same terms as the Charles McDonald 
Brown Scholarship Fund. 

70. The Bert Michael Scholarship. Sixty dollars per year, the in- 
come of a fund given by the family of the late Bert Michael, of the 
class of 1912, to be given to a member of the Junior class, selected 
by a committee of the Faculty. 

71. The Arkwright Fund. The income of a fund given by Preston 
S. Arkwright, to be lent on the same terms as the Charles McDonald 
Brown Scholarship Fund. 

72. The Joseph Henry Lumpkin Scholarship Fund. The income 
of a fund given by Joseph Henry Lumpkin, to be lent on the same 
terms as the Charles McDonald Brown Scholarship Fund. 

73. The Dodd Fund. The income of a fund given by Eugene and 
Harry Dodd, to be lent on the same terms as the Charles McDonald 
Brown Scholarship Fund. 

74. The Brand Fund. The sum of $150.00 per year during the 
life of Hon. C. H. Brand, with provision for perpetuity. 

75. The Lipscomb Fund. The sum of $200.00 per year, with pro- 
vision for perpetuity. 

The Phelps-Stokes Fellowship 

76. This Fellowship has been endowed under the following resolu- 
tions of the Trustees of the Phelps-Stokes Fund: 

"Whereas, Miss Caroline Phelps-Stokes in establishing the Phelps- 
Stokes Fund was especially solicitous to assist in improving the con- 
dition of the negro, and 

"Whereas, It is the conviction of the Trustees that one of the best 
methods of forwarding this purpose is to provide means to enable 
southern youth of broad sympathies to make a scientific study of the 
negro and his adjustment to American civilization: 

"Resolved, That twelve thousand five hundred dollars ($12,500) 
•be given to the University of Georgia for the permanent endowment 
of a research fellowship, on the following conditions: 

"1. The University shall appoint annually a Fellow in Sociology, 
for the study of the Negro. He shall pursue advanced studies under 



UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 4 5 

the direction of the Departments of Sociology, Economics. Educa- 
tion or History, as may be determined in each case by the Chancel- 
lor. The Fellowship shall yield $500, and shall, after four years, be 
restricted to graduate students. 

"2. Each Fellow shall prepare a paper or thesis embodying the 
result of his investigation, which shall be published by the Univer- 
sity with assistance from the income of the fund, any surplus re- 
maining being applicable to other objects incident to the main pur- 
pose of the Fellowship. A copy of these resolutions shall be in- 
corporated in every publication issued under this foundation. 

"The right to make all necessary regulations, not inconsistent 
with the spirit and letter of these resolutions, is given to the Chan- 
cellor and Faculty, but no changes in the conditions of the founda- 
tion can be made without the mutual consent of both the Trustees 
of the University and of the Phelps-Stokes Fund." 

OPPORTUNITIES FOR SELF-HELP 

77. A considerable number of students secure remunerative em- 
ployment to aid them in their education. Usually the students of 
Agriculture are able to secure work on the farm for which they are 
paid. In a few instances other departments need the services of 
students. Usually these places go to those who have been in attend- 
ance for some time, and who are known to be willing, capable, and 
trustworthy. The University does not assume any responsibility 
whatever in this matter. As a matter of accommodation the Com- 
mittee on Self-Help cooperate as far as possible with students. The 
Y. M. C. A. offers its services in helping young men to secure em- 
ployment. Very much depends, however, on the individual's power 
of initiative. Students should not come to the University expecting 
others to find places for them. 

It seems necessary to warn students on this subject. The average 
young man cannot ordinarily do much more than earn his living 
when he has nothing else to do. To earn a living and at the same 
time carry the work of a college course planned to occupy a student's 
full time is more than most students can accomplish. In a few 
instances they have succeeded, but as a rule students who attempt 
more than partial self-support should expect to lengthen their term 
of study. 

DISCIPLINE AND GENERAL. REGULATIONS 

7 8. The discipline of the colleges at Athens is in the hands of the 
Chancellor of the University, who in its administration may ask 
advice of the Faculty. The honor system prevails and formal regu- 
lations are few and general in character. 

The State of Georgia extends the privileges of the University to 
all persons who are qualified for admission. Thus the University 



46 UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

does not receive patronage, but is itself the patron of those who 
seek its privileges and honors. It is maintained at public expense 
for the public good. It cannot, however, be the patron of inefficiency, 
idleness, or dissipation. Its classes have no room except for those 
who diligently pursue the studies of their choice and are willing to 
be governed in their conduct by the rules of propriety. Every 
student owes to the public a full equivalent of expenditures in his 
behalf, both while in the institution and afterwards. 

The Registrar's books will be open Monday, Sept. 15th, and the 
following rule has been passed by the Board of Trustees relative to 
registration: 

80. All students registering after Saturday noon following the 
Wednesday on which the University opens shall pay an extra regis- 
tration fee of $2.50, unless excused from the payment of the same 
by the Chancellor. 

81. The annual session of the University is divided into three 
terms, as follows: 

First Term — From the opening in September to the beginning 
of the Christmas vacation. 

Second Term — Beginning at the close of the Christmas vacation 
and extending to and including the third Saturday in March. 

Third Term — Beginning at the close of the second term and ex- 
tending to and including the Friday before Commencement Day. 

82. At the end of and within each term a sufficient number of 
days is set apart for term examinations, two examinations, of not 
more than three hours duration each, being given on each day, and 
the examinations for the Senior classes at the end of the third term 
conclude on the Wednesday preceding Commencement Day. 

83. The term examinations of any session will be open to students 
who may have failed in the examinations of preceding sessions. 

84. No other examinations (except the regular entrance exami- 
nations) will be authorized by the Faculty or held by the officers 
of instruction, it being understood that this regulation does not 
forbid written tests within the regular class hour, provided the 
preparation for such written tests does not involve neglect of other 
duty. 

85. Five reports of the standing of students are made during the 
session, one at the end of each term, and one each at the middle of 
the first and second terms. 

86. In any one session three marks below "C" or two below "D," 
or as many as three unexcused absences on any term or half-term re- 
port, operate to exclude the recipient from participation in inter- 
collegiate athletics, or musical or dramatic performances, whether 
as player or officer, or in public speaking or debate, until the next 
report. 



UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 47 

87. Three marks below "C" or two below "D" on the final report 
exclude the recipient from participation in intercollegiate athletics, 
or musical or dramatic performances, or in public speaking or de- 
bate, during the following session, unless he take over every subject 
in which the failure was made, or remove by examination enough of 
the deficiencies to restore him to eligibility by these regulations. 

88. The mark of a student who changes his course after the mid- 
dle of a term is that which he received on the mid-term report. 

89. Students having credit in the Registrar's office for as many as 
twelve session hours shall rank as Sophomores. Those having credit 
in the Registrar's office for as many as thirty session hours shall 
rank as Juniors. Those having credit in the Registrar's office for 
as many as forty-five session hours shall rank as Seniors, provided 
that no member of the Senior class shall be a candidate for gradua- 
tion whose conditions at the beginning of the second term of his 
Senior year shall be in excess of eight hours. Students having credit 
in the Registrar's office for less than twelve session hours shall rank 
as Freshmen. 

90. The annual Commencement exercises are held on the third 
Wednesday in June. Other exercises are held on preceding days, 
and the baccalaureate sermon is preached on the Sunday preceding. 
The summer vacation extends from Commencement Day to the 
third Wednesday in September. During this time, however, the 
Summer Session of the University is held, as indicated in the Calen- 
dar. A short recess is given at Christmas, and national and state 
holidays are observed, as indicated in the Calendar. 

STUDENT ADVISERS 

91. Students are assigned in suitable numbers to the several mem- 
bers of the Faculty for special oversight. In case of any proposed 
change in his course of study, a student must consult his adviser, 
who will judge the reasons for the change and report the case to the 
Dean for final action. 

CHAPEL EXERCISES 

92. Chapel exercises, conducted by the Chancellor or some mem- 
ber of the Faculty, are held every morning except Sunday in the 
Chapel. On Sunday the students may attend services in any of the 
Sunday Schools, Churches, and Religious Associations in the city. 
These are as follows: Baptist, Catholic, Christian, Episcopal, Meth- 
odist, Presbyterian, Jewish Synagogue, Young Men's Christian Asso- 
ciation, etc. 

93. HONORS AND APPOINTMENTS 

Sophomore Declaimers. In April of each year ten members of the 
Sophomore class are selected to compete for a declamation prize 
offered at Commencement. 



4 8 UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

Junior Speakers. Six members of the Junior class are selected on 
the basis of original speeches to represent the class at Commence- 
ment. 

Senior Speakers. The Senior class is represented on Commence- 
ment Day by two orators, the selection being made on the merits of 
original speeches. No student who fails to receive his degree may 
appear among the speakers. 

Speakers from the Law Department. Two members of the Law 
Department are selected by the Faculty to represent that department 
on Commencement Day. 

Valedictorian. At the regular Faculty meeting, on Monday before 
the third Wednesday in May, the Faculty nominates not more than 
five members of the Senior class who stand first in scholarship. The 
names are submitted in alphabetical order to the Senior class, and 
they elect from them a valedictorian, with the understanding that 
he shall maintain his standing in scholarship but need not be the 
first honor man. 

No student is allowed to appear at Commencement either as speak- 
er or declaimer who is not a member in good and full standing of 
one of the literary societies, and who has not taken instruction in 
declamation in this or some other institution — in either event to the 
satisfaction of the Professor of English. 

The Debaters' Medals. Six gold medals are offered by the Board 
of Trustees, to be awarded as prizes to members of the Freshman 
and Sophomore classes for excellence in debating. A medal is 
awarded to each of the debaters representing the Literary Society 
which wins a debate. 

• The Ready Writers' Medal. To encourage the art of composition, 
the Board of Trustees award a gold medal for the best essay written 
by any student of the University upon a theme announced after the 
competitors enter the room. 

The Willcox Prizes. Two prizes, in French and German, of 
$50.00 (gold) each, have been offered for competition in the Senior 
class in French and in German. These prizes were founded in 1896 
as a memorial to their lamented father, by the sons of the late 
Prof. Cyprian Porter Willcox, A.M., LL.D., who, from 1872 until 
his death in 1895, filled with great distinction the chair of Modern 
Languages in the University. In 1918 the prize in German was 
discontinued. 

The Freshman Prize. The "Hamilton McWhorter Prize," as of 
the class of 1875, for general excellence in the Freshman class, is 
awarded to the member of that class who stands first in scholarship. 

The Bryan Prize. The Hon. W. J. Bryan has donated the sum 
of two hundred and fifty dollars, the income of which is given an- 



UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 49 

nually as a prize to the writer of. the best essay on our form of gov- 
ernment. 

The Peabody Scholarship. In 1903 Mr. George Foster Peabody 
established a permanent scholarship in Harvard University for the 
benefit of a graduate of this institution. The appointment is made 
annually by the Chancellor. 

The Philosophy Prize. Two prizes of fifty dollars each were 
founded in 19 02 by Judge Horace Russell, of New York. These 
prizes, named by the Board of Trustees the "Horace Russell Prize 
in Psychology," and the "Walter B. Hill Prize in Ethics," are award- 
ed to the writers of the best essays on subjects assigned by the 
Professor of Philosophy. 

The Cadet Prize. A prize is annually awarded to the best drilled 
cadet in the Corps in a competitive contest held during CommenceT 
ment. 

The R. E. Park, Jr., Prize. Prof. R. E. Park, Jr., offers a gold 
medal for the best oration by a member of the Junior class. 

The L. H. Charbonnier Prize. A prize of a fine set of drawing in- 
struments is offered by Mrs. Jas. F. Gowan, of Augusta, in honor of 
her father, who for more than thirty years served the University 
with distinction as Professor of Engineering, Commandant of Cadets 
and Professor of Physics and Astronomy. This prize will be given 
to the member of the graduating class whose record in the school of 
Physics has been most creditable. 

The College of Agriculture Prize. The Trustees offer a prize of 
twenty-five dollars in gold to the student in Agriculture writing the 
best essay on a subject assigned by the professors of agriculture. 
Other prizes offered to students in Agriculture are described in the 
statement of the College of Agriculture. 

PUBLICATIONS OF THE UNIVERSITY 

94. Bulletin of The University of Georgia. Under this general 
title the University issues a monthly publication, which is sent to 
regular mailing lists or may be had upon application to the Uni- 
versity. 

This includes the Register, the General Catalogue of the Univer- 
sity system, announcements of the Summer Session, the Law Depart- 
ment, the School of Pharmacy, the Graduate School, the Peabody 
School of Education, the School of Commerce, the Summer Coaching 
School, the Alumni Number, the Catalogue of Trustees, Officers and 
Alumni, and several numbers of a scientific and literary nature. 

University Items, a news letter, issued fortnightly during the 
session. 

From the College of Agriculture are issued: 

Bulletins of Farmers' Institutes, President Soule, Editor. 



50 UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

Bulletins of the Experiment Station, Director H. P. Stuckey, 
Editor, Experiment, Ga. 

Bulletins of the College of Agriculture. 

85. The publications conducted by the students include: 

The Red and Black, a weekly now in its twenty-fourth volume, 
the organ of the Athletic Association. 

The Georgian, a monthly literary magazine. 

The Pandora, an illustrated annual of college life, issued by the 
Senior eyas's. 

The University Handbook, issued by the Y. M. C. A. 

The Engineering Annual, now in its nineteenth volume, issued by 
the Engineering Society. 

The Agricultural Quarterly, published quarterly by the Agricul- 
tural Club. 

LITERARY SOCIETIES 

96. The Demosthenian Society was founded in 1801, and the Phi 
Kappa Literary Society in 1820. The members of the societies meet 
in their respective halls every Wednesday evening at 8 o'clock. 

On the evening of February 2 0th these Societies celebrate to- 
gether, with public exercises, the anniversary of their founding. 

Under the auspices of the Literary Societies intercollegiate de- 
bates are held annually. 

A Champion Debate between the two literary societies is held on 
the Monday evening of Commencement week. 

STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS 

97. The College Young Men's Christian Association holds weekly 
meetings which are addressed by local or visiting ministers, or by 
members of the Faculty; prayer-meetings are also held daily. 

The Association has its own secretary, whose time is devoted to 
this work. Attractive reading rooms, containing the current period- 
icals, are open to all students. The Association also conducts an 
employment bureau and is of service in arranging boarding places 
for new students. At the opening of each session, a mass meeting 
which is largely attended, is held under its auspices. 

The Engineering Society was organized in 1889. Its object is 
to create an interest among the students in matters pertaining to 
civil, electrical, and architectural engineering, and recent develop- 
ment along all lines of scientific research. The society holds fort- 
nightly meetings during the session, at which papers are read and 
lectures delivered. The society publishes in June the "Engineering 
Annual." 

99. The Athletic Association is a student organization for the 
encouragement and management of athletic sports. Football, bas- 
ketball, baseball, and track teams are regularly organized. Subject 



UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 51 

to the general direction of the Faculty Chairman, the management 
of the athletic activities of the University is delegated to the Ath- 
letic Association. 

100. The Agricultural Club was organized in 1906. Its object is 
to create and promote interest among the students in matters per- 
taining to agriculture and allied sciences. It holds regular meetings 
and publishes a quarterly magazine called the "Agricultural Quar- 
terly." 

101. Other student organizations are the Press Club, the Glee 
Club, the College Orchestra, and the Thalian Dramatic Association. 

102. Regulations concerning student organizations and publica- 
tions may be had on application to the Chancellor's office. 

SOCIETY OF ALUMNI 

This society is composed of graduates of the University, and has 
for its object the promotion of letters and science, as well as the 
annual renewal of the associations of aoademic life. It holds its 
meetings at the close of each session, when an orator is appointed 
by the society from among its members. The oration is delivered 
on Tuesday during Commencement. 

The officers of the organization are: 

Clark Howell President 

T. J. Shackelford First Vice-President 

W. A. Harris Second Vice-President 

D. S. Atkinson Third Vice-President 

C. M. Strahan Treasurer 

W. O. Payne Assistant Treasurer 

Sylvanus Morris Secretary 

Land Trustees 

D. C. Barrow. 
T. J. Shackelford. 
Harry Hodgson. 

These Trustees, appointed by the Society, are charged with the 
duty of purchasing additions to the campus and conveying these 
parcels of land to the Trustees of the University. 



52 UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

FRANKLIN COLLEGE 

THE COLLEGE OF ARTS 



STAFF OF INSTRUCTION 



D. C. BARROW, LL.D., Chancellor. 

C. M. SNELLING, Sc.D., President, and Professor of Mathematics. 



H. C. WHITE, Ph.D., Sc.D., D.C.L., LL.D., Professor of Chemistry, 
and Terrell Professor of Agricultural Chemistry. 

W. H. BOCOCK, LL.D., Milledge Professor of Ancient Languages. 

J. H. T. McPHERSON, Ph.D., Professor of History and Political 
Science. 

W. D. HOOPER, A.M., Professor of Latin. 

J. MORRIS, A.M., Professor of Germanic Languages. 

J. LUSTRAT, Bach es Lett., Professor of Romance Languages. 

R. E. PARK, A.M., Litt.D., Professor of English. 

T. J. WOOFTER, Ph.D., Professor of Philosophy and Education. 

J. S. STEWART, Ped.D., Professor of Secondary Education. 

S. V. SANFORD, Litt.D., Professor of English Language. 

L. L. HENDREN, Ph.D., Professor of Physics and Astronomy. 

J. M. READE, Ph.D., Professor of Botany. 

R. P. BROOKS, Ph.D., DeRenne Professor of Georgia History. 

C. J. HEATWOLE, M.S., Professor of Education. 

W. O. PAYNE, A.M., Associate Professor of History and Political 
Science. 

R. P. STEPHENS, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Mathematics. 

H. V. BLACK, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Chemistry. 

*A. S. EDWARDS, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Psychology. 

R. L. McWHORTER, A.M., Adjunct Professor of Latin and Greek. 

R. S. POND, Ph.D., Adjunct Professor of Mathematics. 

*R. P. WALKER, A.M., Adjunct Professor of English. 

H. D. DOZIER, A.M., Professor of Finance. 

*G. L. WILLIAMS, A.M., Adjunct Professor of Finance. 

*E. E. PEACOCK, M.B.A., Instructor in Accounting and Industry. 

W. C. GEORGE, Ph.D., Adjunct Professor of Zoology. 

R. W. RAMIREZ, A.B., Adjunct Professor of Romance Languages. 

W. T. WRIGHT, M.S., Adjunct Professor Physics. 

S. M. SALYER, A.M., Adjunct Professor of English. 



* In the Government service. 



FRANKLIN COLLEGE 53 

ENTRANCE SUBJECTS 

The following subjects are required for admission to Franklin 
College: English, History, Plane Geometry, High School Algebra, 
Latin, and Greek or French or German or Spanish. (For details as 
to subjects and methods of admission, see pages 244ff.) 

For admission to the Sophomore Class, the student must offer in 
addition to the subjects mentioned above, the equivalent of the 
courses in Mathematics, Latin, English, History, and Greek or 
French or German pursued by the Freshman Class and given in the 
table below. In this table the figure attached to the name of the 
subject refers 'to the course described under that number in the 
detailed account of the courses offered in that school. Thus, 
"English 1" in the table below means the course in Composition 
and Rhetoric described in the staement of the School of English 
on page 60. The figures at the end of the line means the number 
of recitation hours per week in that course. 

The undergraduate degrees given in Franklin College are those 
of Bachelor of Arts, Bachelor of Arts in Social Science, and Bach- 
elor of Journalism. Options in the Junior and Senior classes must 
be selected after conference with and with the consent of the Pres- 
ident of the College. 

BACHELOR OF ARTS 

The subjects entering into the course for this degree are given 
below: 

Freshman Hrs. Sophomores Hrs. 

English 1, p. 60 3 English 2, p. 60 3 

Greek 1, p. 62 4 Greek 2, p. 62; or French* 2, 

o A * p. 72; or German* 2, p. 62, 

French 1*, p. 72 or German 1* or Spanish 2, p. 73 _ _ _ _ 3 

p. 62 or Spanish 1, p. 73 _ 3 History 4, p. 64 3 

Georgia History, p. 64 1 Latin 2, p. 66________ 3 

History 2f, p. 63 3 Mathematics 3, 4, p. 67 3 

Latin 1, p. 66 4 Physics 2**, p. 69 3 

Mathematics 1, 2, p. 66 _ _ _ 3 
Military Science 1, p. 68 _ _ 1 

18 18 

♦If Greek 1 and 2 are omitted, two years in each of two modern 
languages must be taken. The second language will be taken in 
addition to the five required Junior subjects, and among the five 
required Senior subjects. (French la, German la and Spanish la 
thus offered will satisfy the requirements of Group I in the Junior 
year). 

•[Candidates taking Greek X will not be required to take History 2. 

**And one laboratory period. 



54 



UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 



Junior 



1 



J 



f English Lang. 1, p. 61 

| French la, p. 72 

I. -{ German la, p. 62 _ _ 
Spanish la, p. 73 _ _ 
Greek 3, p. 63 _ _ _ 
Latin 3, p. 66 _ _ _ 

History 5-6, p. 64 

• Economics 5, p. 62 _ 
Philosophy 3, 4, p. 71 
Botany 3*, p. 5 8 _ _ 

Zoology 3*, p. 58 

III. \ Chemistry 2, p. 59 _ 

i Phys. 4* or 5*, p. 69 

[Psychol. 5*, p. 70 _ 

English 3, 4, 6, or 

11, p. 60 

Journalism 1, 2, 

p. 65 

Greek Xa or X&, 

p. 62 

History 8-9, or 13, or 

14, p. 64 

Government 11, 12, 

p. 64 

History 10, p. 64 _ 
Economics 6, 7, or 

8, 9, or 10-14, or 

11-15, or 16, p. 
Psychology 1. 2, 

p. 70______3 

Education 1-2, 5-6, 

10, 12, p. 71 3 

Mathematics 5 or 4a, 

6, p. 67 3 

Italian 1, p. 73 _ _ 3 
Law 1, p. 55 _ _ _ _ 3 

Five subjects must be taken. 

Senior 



One required. 



[ One required. 



One required; two may be taken. 



60 3 



\ English Lang. 2, p. 61 

I French 2a, p. 72 _ _ 

I. \ German 2r/, p. 62 _ _ 

Spanish 2a, p. 73 _ _ 

Latin 4, p. 66 

Greek 3 or 4, p. 63 _ 
His. 8-9, or 13-14, 64 
Gov'm't 11, 12. p. 64 

II. -I Econ. 5, p. 60 

| Philosophy 3-4, p. 71 
I Sociology 5-6, 9, p. 71 
{ Bot.* 3, 4, 9, or 11, 

p. 58 

| Zoology 3, 4, 5, p. 58 
III. ! ('hem. 2, 3, 4, 5, or 

8, p. 59 _ 

I Phvsics* 4, 5, or 6, 

p. 69 

l Psy.* 5 or 6, p. 70 _ 



1 

| One required. 



One required. 



One required; two may be taken 



And one laboratory period 



FRANKLIN COLLEGE 55 

Astronomy and Geology, p. 69 3 

English 3, 4, 5, 6 or 11, p. 60 3 

English Language 1, p. 61 _ 3 

Journalism 3, 4, 5, 6, p. 65 _ 3 

History 5-6, or 8-9, p. 64 3 

Economics 6, 7, 8, or 9, or 10, 

11 or 11-15, or 16, p. 60 _ _ 3 

French Language, p. 72 _ _ _ 3 

Spanish Language, p. 73 _ _ 3 

Latin 3, p. 66 3 

Greek Xa or X&, p. 6 3 3 

German Language, p. 62 _ _ 3 
Mathematics 5, or any two of 

7, 8, 9, p. 67 3 

Newspaper writing, p. 65 _ _ 3 

Education 3, 7, p. 71 _ _ _ _ 3 

Education 4-8, 5-6, 9-10, p. 71 3 

Psychology 3a, b, c, p. 70 3 

Law, p. 55 3 

♦And one laboratory period. 

Five subjects must be taken. 

Note: — No student may take more than nine hours in one year 
from the courses in Psychology, Philosophy, and Education. 

Six hours of academic credit are allowed for studies in the Law 
School taken in the Junior and Senior years of the Bachelor of Arts 
course. The law courses designated are: 

Law 1, consisting of 1, Elementary Law. 

a. Blackstone 1, 2, 3. 

b. American Elementary Law. 

2. Torts. 

3. Criminal Law. 
Counting four hours. 

Law 2, consisting of 1, Constitutional Law. 

2. Contracts. 

3. Sales. 

4. Bailments. 
Counting two hours. 

BACHELOR OF ARTS IN THE SOCIAL SCIENCES 

Requirements for Degree 

Latin 1; Latin 2 or Mathematics 3-4. Mathematics 1-2; Mathe- 
matics 3-4 or Latin 2. In one other foreign language, 6 hours. 
History. 3 hours; Georgia History, 1 hour; English, 3 hours; Na- 
tural Science, 6 hours; Military, 3 hours. 

With major in Philosophical-Social Science: History-Political 



56 UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

Science, 9 hours; Education, 6 hours; Philosophical-Social Science, 
12 hours. 

With major in History-Political Science: Philosophical-Social 
Science, 9 hours; Education, 3 hours; Economics, 3 hours; History- 
Political Science, 12 hours. 

With major in Education: History-Political Science, 9 hours; 
Philosophical-Social Science, 6 hours; Education, 12 hours. 

Total requirements, 66 hours, or 6 3 when Greek is taken as the 
language elective. 

Freshman Hrs. Sophomore Hrs. 

Latin 1, p. 66 3 Latin 2; or Math. 3-4, p. 67 _ 3 

Greek, p. 62; or French, p. Greek, p. 62; or French, p. 

72; or German, p. 62; or 72; or German, p. 63; or 

Spanish, p. 73 3 Spanish, p. 73______3 

Mathematics 1-2, p. 66 3 Physics, Chemistry, Biology, 

English 1, p. 60 ______ _ 3 Botany (in each of two) _ 6 

History, p. 63 3 Psychology, p. 70 3 

Georgia History, p. 64 _ _ _ 1 Elective _________3 

Military Science, p. 68 _ _ _ _ 1 

Note: — This statement of hours has reference to work in the 
University or in instiutionns accredited for advanced standing. 

Junior and Senior 

The remainder of the courses included in the requirements with 
additional elective courses to complete the total of hours. 

With itihe major in Philosophical-Social Science or in Education 
the courses must be selected under the direction and with the ap- 
proval of the Dean of Education. 

With the major in History-Political Science, the courses must be 
selected under the direction and with the approval of the head of 
this department. 

Students coming from other colleges with 30 hours to their credit 
may enter with Senior college standing, but 36 hours of credit will 
be necessary for full Senior college rating. 

BACHELOR OF JOURNALISM 

Requirements for Admission: The requirements for admission 
to the School of Journalism are (1) identical with those required 
for the A.B. or B.S. degrees, and (2) the satisfactory completion of 
the first two years' work of the A.B. or B.S. (General) or the B.S. 
(Commerce). 

Special Students: Students more than 21 years old may be ad- 
mitted to the School of Journalism, at the discretion of the Dean 
of the University, without having met the entrance requirements. 
No special student may become a candidate for the degree until he 



FRANKLIN COLLEGE 



57 



satisfies the full entrance requirements as specified for this school. 

The Degree: The degree of Bachelor of Journalism will be given 
upon the satisfactory completion of the four-year course outlined 
below. 

Students who can afford the time are strongly advised to take 
the five-year course, the A.B. combined with the Bachelor of 
Journalism. 

Requirements for Graduation: 

1. He must satisfy the full entrance requirements for the A.B. 
or B.S. (General) degree. 

2. He must complete the first two years' work of 3 6 hours 
required for the A.B. degree, or the 3 7 hours required for 
the B.S. (General) or the B.S. (Commerce) degree. 

3. He must complete at least a major of fifteen hours in 
Journalism. 

4. He must complete a total of 72 hours. 

3. He must be able to read a French, German, or Spanish 
newspaper. 

Courses of Study 

In addition to the first two years' work required for the A.B. or 
the B.S. (General) or the B.S. (Commerce) degrees, the subjects 
entering into this course for the degree of Bachelor of Journalism 
are given below: 

Junior 

3 



Journalism 1 
Journalism 2 
History 5-6 
German la 
French la 
Spanish 1 
Philosophy 3-4 
Psychology 1 or 5 
Sociology 9 
Education 5-6 
Economics 5 
English 3, 4, 6, 9 or 11 
English Language 1 
Natural Science 



hours 
hours 
hours 
hours 
hours 
hours 
hours 
hours 
hours 
hours 
hours 
hours 
hours 
hours 



Three required 



y One required 



Two required 



58 



UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 



Senior 



Journalism 3 
Journalism 4-5 
Journalism 6-7 
Political Science 11-2 
German 2a 
French 2a 
Spanish 2 
Philosophy 3-4 
Psychology 5 or 1 
Sociology 9 
Education 5-6 
Economics 5, 6-7, or 8-9 
English 3, 4, 5, 6, 9 or 11 
English Language 1 or 2 
Natural Science 
Agriculture 



hours 
hours 
hours 
hours 
hours 
hours 
hours 
hours 
hours 
hours 
hours 
hours 
hours 
hours 
hours 
hours 



Four required 



One required 



Three required 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 



BIOLOGY 
Botany 

J. M. READE, Professor. 
W. C. WANG, Assistant. 

*3. Introductory Plant Biology. This is the complement of 
Zoology 3, the two courses together constituting General Biology. 
Three recitations and two hours of laboratory work per week for 
three terms. Prerequisite for Botany 4, 5, 6, 9, and 11. 

4. Morphology. A comparative study in particular of the groups 
leading to a land flora. Two recitations and four hours of labor- 
atory work per week for three terms. Botany 3 is prerequisite. 

9. Physiology. Experiment and connected assigned reading. Six 
hours laboratory work and one conference hour per week for three 
terms. Botany 3 is prerequisite. 

11. Genetics. An introduction to the study of heredity, 
lectures or recitations per week for three terms. Botany 3 
requisite. 

ZOOLOGY 

W. C. GEORGE, Adjunct Professor. 

■ , Assistant. 

The following courses are offered: 

3. Introductory Animal Biology. This is the complement of Bot- 
any 3, the two courses together constituting General Biology. Three 
recitations and two hours laboratory work per week for three weeks. 
Prerequisite to Zoology 4 and 5. 



Three 
is pre- 



* Offered also in the Summer Session, 1919. 



FRANKLIN COLLEGE 59 

4. Vertebrate Morphology. The various organ systems are stud- 
ied in detail, especial attention being given to the homologies found 
in the various vertebrate groups. Three recitations and two hours 
laboratory work per week for three terms. Prerequisite, Zoology 3. 

5. Histology- and Embryology. The first two terms are devoted to 
practice in the general methods employed in making microscopical 
preparations and to a study of the histological structure of the more 
important types of tissues and organs; the third term is devoted to 
the embryology of the frog and chick. Two recitations and at lea-st 
four hours of laboratory work per week. Prerequisite, Zoology 3. 

A. The Human Body. An introductory course for those not suf- 
ficiently prepared to enter Zoology 3. Three recitations or lectures 
per week for three terms, 

CHEMISTRY 

H. C. WHITE, Professor. 

H. V. BLACK, Associate Professor. 

C. B. SWETLAND, Instructor. 

The following courses are offered: 

2. Inorganic Chemistry, College Course. Three hours per week 
of lectures and recitations for three terms. Text: Alexander Smith, 
General Chemistry. 

2u. Laboratory Course, to accompany Course 2. Two laboratory 
periods per week for three terms. 

2b. A more extensive laboratory course, also to accompany Course 
2. Four laboratory periods per week for three terms. 

3. Organic Chemistry. Three hours per week of lectures and 
recitations and two laboratory periods per week for three terms. 
Open to students who have completed Courses 2 and 2a or 2 and 2b. 
Text: Stoddard, Introduction to Organic Chemistry. 

4. Industrial (Including Agricultural) Chemistry. Three hours 
per week of lectures and recitation for three terms. Texts: Pro- 
fessor's Notes; Thorp, Industrial Chemistry; and Reference texts. 

5. Physical Chemistry. Three hours per week of lectures and 
recitations and two laboratory periods for three terms. Open to 
students who have completed Courses 2 and 2<t or 2 and 2b. 

8. Analytical Chemistry. About two-thirds of this course is de- 
voted to qualitative analysis, on the completion of which quanti- 
tative analysis is begun. Six laboratory periods per week for three 
terms. Open to students who have completed Courses 2 and 2(7 or 
2 and 2b. Texts: W. A. Noyes, Qualitative Analysis; Morse, Exer- 
cises in Quantitative Chemistry. 

A fee of $2.50 is charged for chemicals used in Courses 2«, 2b, 3, 
and 5. Necessary apparatus is furnished students and breakage 
must be paid for at the end of the course. 



60 UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

ECONOMICS AND BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

For courses see the announcement of the School of Commerce. 

ENGLISH 

R. E. PARK, Professor. 
S. M. SALYER, Assistant Professor. 
R. P. WALKER, Adjunct Professor. 
S. V. SANFORD, Professor of English Language. 

A. The Elements of English. Business correspondence, a review 
of grammar, composition writing and the reading of selected classics. 
Required of one year students in Agriculture who are not eligible 
to enter English 1. Three hours a week. 

1. Rhetoric. (a) A study of the fundamental principles of 
rhetoric; (b) their application to the problems of composition and 
themes; (c) their application to the interpretation of literature. 
Weekly. Required of Freshmen. Three hours a week. Professor 
Park, Adjunct Professor Salyer. 

2. English Literature. The principles .of literary criticism and 
the practical application of these principles to masterpieces studied 
with reference to (a) elements of literature; (b) species of litera- 
ture; (c) historical development. The object of this course is to 
give to the student a general view of the history and development 
of English literature, with detailed knowledge of certain periods. 
Throughout the course much attention will be devoted to the writing 
of essays as a means of training the student to appreciate and to 
express his appreciation of the literature studied. Required of 
Sophomores. Three hours a week. Professor Park, Adjunct Professor 
Sah/cr. 

3. American Literature. This course attempts to give a compre- 
hensive account of American literature. The leading writers in 
prose and poetry are considered, first as to their intrinsic worth, 
and secondly, as illustrative of the national development. The third 
term will be devoted to the literature of Georgia. Optional for 
Juniors and Seniors. Three hours a week. (Omitted in 1917-1918). 
Professor Sanford. 

4. The Novel. The development of the novel in English. The 
study of representative novels of Richardson, Fielding, Bronte, 
Austen, Scott, Dickens, Thackeray, Eliot, Stevenson, Hardy, Kipling, 
De Morgan, Cooper, Hawthorne, Howells, Allen, Fox, Churchill. 
Frequent writing of brief papers on subjects involving collateral 
readings in the authors discussed. Optional for Juniors and Seniors. 
Three hours a week. Professor Sanford. 

5. The English Drama. Specimens of the pre-Shakespearean 
drama and the study of selected plays from Marlowe to the present 
time. Papers on the sources, structure and literary qualities of the 



FRANKLIN COLLEGE 61 

plays studied. Optional for Seniors. Three hours a week. Professor 
Park. 

6. The Short Story and the English Essay. The great essay writ- 
ers of the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries will be studied dur- 
ing the first half of this course. The second half-year will be de- 
voted to the study of the short story, with especial reference to 
structure. Optional for Juniors and Seniors. Three hours a week. 
Professor Park. 

9. The Chief English Poets of the Nineteenth Century, Words- 
worth, Coleridge, Byron, Shelley, Keats, Arnold, Tennyson, Brown- 
ing. The course consists in the study of the principal works of these 
poets, the collateral reading of a considerable body of biography and 
criticism, and the writing at frequent intervals of brief critical pa- 
pers. Optional for Juniors and Seniors. Three hours a week. 
(Omitted in 1918-1919). Adjunct Professor Saltier. 

11. Shakespeare. The best of the works of Shakespeare will be 
studied, with sidelights upon the life of the Elizabethans. King 
Lear will be studied minutely. Adjunct Professor Salyer. 

ENGLISH LANGUAGE 

1. Anglo-Saxon. Phonology, Inflections, and Translation. Text- 
books: Smith's Old English Grammar, and Bright's Anglo-Saxon 
Reader. Three hours a week. Optional for Juniors. Professor 
Sun ford. 

2. Middle English. Chaucer's Prologue and Knight's Tale, with 
lectures based on ten Brink's "Chaucer's Sprache und Verskunst," 
and Morris's "Organic History of English Words," Part II. Three 
hours a week. Optional for Seniors. Professor Sanford. 

3. Old English Epic Poetry, Gothic and Comparative Grammar. 

Text-books: Wyatt's Beowulf, Wright's Gothic Primer. Lectures 

based on Streitberg's "Urgermanische Grammatik." Graduate 
Course. Professor Morris. 

4. English Syntax. This course will deal with the structure of 
the English sentence. Optional for Juniors and Seniors. Three 
hours a week. Professor sanford. 

5. Historical English Syntax. Graduate Course. Professor Sanford. 

PUBLIC SPEAKING 
At present there are held four intercollegiate debates, two inter- 
society debates, two class debates, a Sophomore declamation contest, 
a Junior oratorical contest, a Senior oratorical contest, and the 
anniversarian contests in the two literary societies. All candidates 
for places in these contests are supervised in the preparation and 
instructed in the delivery of their speeches by the Department of 
English. 



62 UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

GEOLOGY 

Vacant.* 
1. General Geology. Three hours per week, second half-year. 
The course of instruction is at first a general one, embracing the 
study of the distinguishing properties of minerals and common 
rocks, the decay of rocks, and the formation of soils. Following 
this is a more extended course of Structural, Dynamical, and Histor- 
ical Geology. 

GERMANIC LANGUAGES 

JOHN MORRIS, Professor. 

1. German X is a course for beginners who are conditioned in 
German such as is described in detail at page 35. Three hours per 
week. Professor Morris. 

2. German 1. Method-book completed; translation of about 200 
pages of modern narrative prose. Three hours per week. Optional 
for Freshmen. Professor Morris. 

3. German 2 presents a course in conversation and sight reading 
with the object of giving a practical mastery of the language. Three 
hours per week. Optional for Sophomores. Professor Morris. 

4. German la is an elementary course offered as one of the Junior 
language options. After an oral introduction of several weeks, given 
exclusively in German, the class takes up a method-book and works 
carefully through all the exercises. Three hours per week. Optional 
for Juniors. Professor Morris. 

5. German 2,<i is a continuation of the preceding course. The class 
translates about 600 pages of prose texts. Some of this work is done 
outside of the class room, but a careful examination is held on each 
book when completed. Practice in speaking German continues 
throughout the year. Three hours per week. Optional for Seniors. 
Professor Morris. 

GFvEEIv 

W. H. BOCOCK, Professor. 

R. L. McWHORTER, Adjunct Professor. 

The standard of this School depends largely upon ithe character 
of work done in the preparatory schools of Georgia. The require- 
ments for admission, given elsewhere, are based directly upon that 
work. With this basis, the guiding principles of the courses given 
to the lower classes are the early mastery of the forms, a minimum 
of syntax, the reading of the language in mass as rapidly as is con- 
sistent with thoroughness. 

In the higher classes the standard syntax of Attic prose is treated 
systematically, and the attempt is made to introduce the student to 



* Temporarily in charge of the Professor of Chemistry 



FRANKLIN COLLEGE 6 3 

an appreciation of the artistic forms of Greek literature. There is 
in all classes some practice in reading at sight. Exercises are given 
in translating from English into Greek, both in order to sharpen 
observation of the Greek read, and as an indispensable aid to exact 
scholarship. Lectures on Metres are given in connection with *:he 
reading of the poets, with practice in the recitation of the Dactylic 
Hexameter, the Iambic Trimeter, and other common verse-forms. 

For the study of geography and history, and for the archaelog- 
ical illustration of the authors read, the lecture-room and library are 
provided with a small collection of books, maps and photographs. 

Xafc. For beginners. See requirements for entrance, page 34). 
(a) Grammar, (fr) Xenophon's Anabasis, Books I, II, III. Six hours 
a week. Professor Bocock. 

Xb. Xenophon's Anabasis, Books I, II, III, with grammatical re- 
view. Three hours a week. Adjunct Profesosr McWhorter. 

X.C. Xenophon's Anabasis, Book III, with grammatical review. 
Three hours a week for the first term. Adjunct Professor McWhorter. 

(For other elementary courses see special Bulletin of the Summer 
School ) . 

1. Xenophon's Hellenica. Homer, Iliad or Odyssey. Geography 
of Hellas. Four hours a week. Required unless French and Ger- 
man be substituted. Professor Bocock and Adjunct Professor McWhorter. 

2. Selections (varying from year to year) from Homer, Herodotus, 
Lysias. History of Literature. Three hours a week. Required 
unless French and German be substituted. Professor Bocock. 

3. Introduction to the study of Greek Tragedy; Euripedes. Selec- 
tions from Plato. History of the Literature. Three hours a week. 
Optional for Juniors or Seniors. Professor Bocock. 

4. Selections from the Tragic Poets, Thucydides, Plato. Demos- 
thenes. Three hours a week. Optional for Seniors. Professor 
Bocock and Adjunct Professor McWhorter. 

5. Selections from the New Testament. Hours to be arranged. 
Optional. Professor Bocock. 

A major course is offered in the Graduate School. 

HISTORY AND POLITICAL SCIENCE 

J. H. T. McPHERSON, Professor. 
W. O. PAYNE. Associate Professor. 
R. P. BROOKS, DeRenne Professor of Georgia History. 

*2. Modern European History. An introductory course, beginning 
with a study of the ancient regime and coming down to the present 
day. Freshmen. Three hours, first and second terms. Professors 
McPherson, Payne and Brooks. 



* Given in the Summer Session, 1919. 



64 UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

2b. American Government. A brief course covering the frame- 
work of the national and state governments, political machinery, 
such as parties, conventions and primaries, and related subjects. 
Freshmen. Three hours, third term. Professors McPherson, Payne 
and Brooks. 

3. History of Georgia. An elementary course, covering the his- 
tory of the state from the beginning. Freshmen. Two hours, sec- 
ond half year. Professor Brooks. 

4. English History. Emphasis is laid on the development of Par- 
liament, the Cabinet, and the various phases of local government. 
Contemporary European developments are kept constantly in view. 
Sophomores. Three hours, throughout the year. Professor Payne. 

4a. Industrial History of Europe. A survey of modern European 
economic history, agricultural, commercial and industrial. Sopho- 
mores in B.S. Agriculture and B.S. Commerce. Three hours, through- 
out the year. Professor Payne. 

*5. American Political History. A general course covering the 
political history of the United States. Juniors and Seniors. Three 
hours, first and second terms. Professor McPherson. 

*6. American Constitutional History. An historical and interpre- 
tative study of the origin and growth of the American Federal and 
State Constitutions. Juniors and Seniors. Three hours, third term. 
Professor McPherson. 

8. Modern European History, 1789-1815. After a preliminary 
survey of European conditions on the eve of the French Revolution, 
the progress of events is followed in detail through the Congress of 
Vienna. Juniors and Seniors. Three hours, first half year. Professor 
Payne. 

9. Modern European History, 1815-1918. The political history of 
Europe from the Congress of Vienna through the War of 1914-1918. 
Juniors and Seniors. Three hours, second half year. Professors Panne 
and Brooks. 

11. Political Science. An introduction to the theory of Political 
Science, comprising a study of the origin, nature, organization and 
functions of the state. Juniors and Seniors. Three hours, first 
term. Professor McPherson. 

12. American Government and Politics. An advanced study of 
the American system of Government, Federal, state and local, in- 
cluding the organization and actual influence of political parties. 
Juniors and Seniors. Three hours, second and third terms. Pro- 
fessor McPherson. 

13. American Industrial History. An advanced course, covering 
certain aspects of American economic history, such as the public 



* Offered in the Summer Session, 1919. 



FRANKLIN COLLEGE 65 

land system, slavery, labor problems, currency and banking, tariff 
legislation, and transportation. Juniors and Seniors. Three hours, 
throughout the year. Professor Brooks. This course and History 14 
will be offered in alternate years, American Industrial History being 
omitted in 1919-1920. 

14. American History, 1850-1876. History 14 will be an intensive 
study of some relatively short period of American history. For the 
session 1919-1920 the subject will be Civil War and Reconstruction. 
Especial attention will be given to Southern problems. Juniors and 
Seniors. Three hours, throughout the year. Professor Brooks. 

15. Spanish-American History. This course covers the history, 
geography, political and social institutions, and the economic de- 
velopment and possibilities of Spanish-American countries. Special 
attention is given to international relations, political and economic. 
Three hours. Mr. Ramirez. 

JOURNALISM 
S .V. SANFORD, Profesor. 

1. Newspaper Reporting and Correspondence. The work of the 
reporter and the correspondent, including news gathering and news- 
paper writing; discussions of methods of presentation; writing and 
rewriting from assignments to develop news values. Three hours a 
week, throughout the year. 

2. Newspaper Editing. Practice in editing copy, correcting proof, 
writing headlines, and other details of editing; construction and 
development of various types of the newspaper story. Three hours 
a week, throughout the year. 

3. Special Articles. Practice in writing articles of a varied char- 
acter to suit the miscellaneous needs of a newspaper; personal, nar- 
rative, descriptive; particular attention is given the short story. 
Three hours a week, throughout the year. 

4. Editorial Writing. The theory and practice of editorial writ- 
ing, interpretation and comment; editorial direction and control. 
Three hours a week, first and second terms. 

5. History and Principles of Journalism. Journalism in various 
periods and conditions; the aims of journalism. Three hours a 
week the third term. 

6. Psychology of Business Procedure. A discussion of the mental 
factors involved in problems of advertising. Three hours a week 
the first term. 

7. Newspaper Advertising. Special attention to selling plans and 
special campaigns; preparation of copy, etc. Three hours a week 
the second and third terms. 

8. Agricultural Journalism. A course planned for students of Vo- 
cational Agriculture. It includes a study of rural publicity, report 
writing, press work on projects, and special work in the compilation 



66 UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

and arrangement of statistical data. Required of Senior vocational 
students. Three hours a week. Mr. Maddux. 

LATIN 

W. D. HOOPER, Professor. 

R. L. MeWHORTER, Adjunct Professor. 

1. In addition to the reading of a play of Terence and selections 
from Livy, the syntax is studied formally, and exercises are given 
in translation from English into Latin, to illustrate the usages. 
There is also constant practice in reading at sight. The third term 
is devoted to an introduction to Horace, including the reading of 
the first book of the Odes. Four hours per week. Required of 
Freshmen. Professor Hooper and Adjunct Professor McWhorter. 

2. Horace: selected Odes; Cicero, de Officiis, Book I. Lectures 
on metres are given in connection with the reading of the Odes, and 
practice in metrical reading is constant. There is also practice in 
reading at sight, and written exercises in translation from English 
into Latin are required weekly. Three hours per week. Required 
of Sophomores. Professor Hooper and Ad in net Professor McWhorter. 

3. Horace: selected Satires and Epistles; Tacitus, Annals; Pliny: 
selected letters; History of the Literature. During the first term, 
the Satires and Epistles of Horace are read somewhat more rapidly, 
with more attention to literary quality, and the history of the liter- 
ature is studied. The second and third terms are devoted to the 
Annals of Tacitus, and Pliny's letters. More attention is paid to 
reading at sight, and some of the reading is parallel. Three hours 
per week. Optional for Juniors. Professor Hooper. 

4. Representative plays of Plautus and Terence are read during 
the first term, both in class and in private, and there are lectures 
on the drama. During the second and third terms, the reading is 
chosen from a variety of authors not studied in the lower classes 
Three hours per week. Optional for Seniors. Professor Hooper. 

MATHEMATICS 

C. M. SNELLING, Professor. 

R. P. STEPHENS, Associate Professor. 

R. S. POND, Adjunct Professor. 

F. J. ORR, Special Instructor. 

Of the following, Courses 1, 2, 3, 4 are required of all students 
for graduation with the degree of A B. or B.S. (General). For other 
degrees, see requirements elsewhere. 

•1. Trigonometry. A course in Plane and Spherical Trigonometry. 
Three hours per week for the first half-year. Text: Hun & Mclnnes. 
Professors Knelling, Stephens and Pond. 



* Offered in the Summer Session, 1919, 



FRANKLIN COLLEGE 67 

*2. Graphical Algebra. This will include a study of coordinates, 
the plotting of curves, and the derivation of the equations of the 
straight line and the circle. Three hours per week for the second 
half year. Professors Snelling, Stephens, and Pond. 

*3. Analysis. The work of Course 2 will be continued by the study 
of the equations of the conies and by introduction to the Calculus. 
Three hours per week for the first half year. Professors Stephens and 
Pond. 

4. Advanced Algebra. The following topics will be treated: com- 
plex numbers, determinants, theory of equations, partial fractions, 
series, and logarithms. Three hours per week for the second half 
year. Professors Stephens and Pond. 

4a. Insurance. An elementary course in probabilities, series, and 
other topics in algebra and their application in the calculation of 
annuities, premiums, etc. Three hours per week the first half year. 
Required of B.S. (Commerce) Sophomores but optional for others on 
approval of the department. Professsor Stephens. 

5. Calculus. A course in Differential and Integral Calculus. 
Three hours per week throughout the year. Professor Pond. 

6. Statistics. Statistical method and theory; general methods of 
statistical investigation; application of probabilities to statistical 
data; graphical methods of presentation of statistics; correlation; 
variation. Three hours per week, second half-year. Required of 
B.S. (Commerce) Sophomores but optional for others on approval 
of the department. Professor Pond. 

7. Differential Equations. An elementary course in ordinary dif- 
ferential equations. Three hours per week for second half-year. 
Text: Cohen's. Professor Stephens. 

8. Analytic Geometry. An advanced course based on Salmon or 
other text of a similar character. Three hours per week for first 
half-year. Professor Pond . 

9. Theoretical Mechanics. An elementary course. Three hours 
per week for the first half-year. Professor Stephens. 

10. The Teaching of High School Mathematics. The value and 
purpose of the study of Mathematics; methods of teaching Arith- 
metic, Algebra, and Geometry. One hour per week for the first half- 
year. Text: Young's. Professor Stephens. 

Note: — Courses 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 7, 9 are required of candidates for 
degrees in Civil and Electrical Engineering. Candidates for the 
B.S. degree who have mathematics for their major must take Course 
5 in the Junior year. 



* Offered also in the Summer Session, 1919. 



68 UNIVERSITY OP GEORGIA 

MILITARY SCIENCE 

M. B. THWEATT, Captain, Infantry, Professor. 

L. H. GORK, Captain, Infantry, Assistant Professor. 
In accordance with the provisions of the land grant act, military 
exercises are regularly held in this university, upon which the at- 
tendance is compulsory by all members of the Freshman, Sophomore 
and Junior classes, and the students in the one-year course in Agri- 
culture, except when excused by the surgeon of the Corps of Cadets, 
the Chancellor, or the Prudential Committee, for physical disability 
or other cause. 

In accordance with authority obtained from the President of the 
United States a unit of the Senior Division, Reserve Officers Training 
Corps has been organized at this institution. 

Any member of the senior division who has completed two aca- 
demic years of service in that division, who has been selected for fur- 
ther training by the Chancellor and the Commandant, and who exe- 
cutes the following written agreement, will be entitled to commuta- 
tion of subsistence fixed by the Secretary of War in accordance with 
law. 

CONTRACT. 

University of Georgia. 

Athens, Ga., 

In consideration of commutation of subsistence to be furnished 
me, in accordance with law, I hereby agree to continue in the Re- 
serve Officers Training Corps during the remainder of my course at 
the University of Georgia, to devote five hours per week during such 
period to the military training prescribed, and to pursue the courses 
of camp training during such period prescribed by the Secretary 
of War. 

Witness Signed 

The commutation of subsistence referred to above is estimated to 
be $12.00 per month during the academic year. 

The course of camp training has been decided to be, one .four- 
weeks' camp at the end of the Junior (third) year and one four- 
weeks' camp subsequent to graduation. 

Necessary uniforms to be furnished by the United States govern- 
ment to those students who comply with the above contract. All 
expenses incurred in attending training camp to be defrayed by the 
United States government. 

Military Science 1. Moss's Manual of Military Training. Two 
hours per week for a half-year. Required of all Freshmen. 



FRANKLIN COLLEGE 69 

PHYSICS AND ASTRONOMY 

L. L. HENDREN, Professor. 

W. T. WRIGHT, Adjunct Professor. 

J. W. CANTRELL, Instructor. 

♦Physics 2. An introductory college course covering the elemen- 
tary principles. Prerequisites, one unit entrance credit in Physics or 
Plane Trigonometry. Three hours per week recitation and two 
hours per week laboratory work throughout the year. Required 
of all Sophomores. 

Physics 4 — Mechanics and Electricity. A second year college 
course. The First Term will be devoted to Mechanics and the Sec- 
ond and Third Terms to Electricity. In the Third Term work in 
Electricity especial emphasis will be laid upon the newer develop- 
ments of Electricity — such as the Electron Theory and the proper- 
ties of electromagnetic waves (wireless telegraphy). Three hours 
per week recitation and two hours per week laboratory work 
throughout the year. Optional for Juniors and Seniors. Prerequi- 
site, the satisfactory completion of Physics 1 or 2, and Mathematics 
1. 2. 

Physics 5 — Heat, Sound and Light. A course of the same grade 
as Physics 4 and covering those parts of General Physics not studied 
in Physics 4. Courses 4 and 5 together are designed to give the 
student a somewhat thorough survey of the experimental data and 
analytical processes upon which the great generalizations in Physics 
rest. Three hours per week recitation and two hours per week 
laboratory work throughout the year. Optional for Juniors and 
Seniors. 

Physics 6 — Advanced Electricity. Discharge of Electricity through 
Gases, Radioactivity. Three hours per week lecture and recitation 
work throughout the year, with some individual laboratory work. 
Optional for Seniors. (Not offered in 1918-1919). 

Astronomy 1. Lectures and recitations designed to give a general 
knowledge of Astronomy. Opportunity will be given for observa- 
tions with a good 3% -inch telescope. Three hours per week for the 
first half-year. 

Note: — A laboratory fee of $3.00 is required for Courses 2, 4 
and 5. 



* Offered in the Summer Session, 1919 



70 UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

PSYCHOLOGY, PHILOSOPHY, AND EDUCATION 

T. J. WOOFTER, Dean. 
J. S. STEWART, Professor. 
A. S. EDWARDS, Professor. 
C. J. HEATWOLE, Professor. 
— — , Professor. 

Note: — The following courses are open to general election. For 
fuller description of these courses, see the subsequent announcement 
of the Peabody School of Education. 

For Teachers Professional License, elect three courses in Educa- 
tion from 1-2, 3, 4-8, 5-6, 9-10. 

PSYCHOLOGY 

1. Elementary Psychology. An introductory course covering the 
essentials of general and educational psychology. First half-year. 
Professor Edwards. 

This may be followed by Psychology 3 or Education 1 the second 
half-year. 

3. Applied Psychology. Topics will be selected each year, mainly 
from the following, Psychology 1 or 5 being prerequisites: 

3a. Social and Business Psychology. A brief review of social 
psychology and an application of psychological principles and men- 
tal tests to problems of advertising and salesmanship. 

3o. Legal and Vocational Psychology. A study of psychological 
problems involved in law, everyday life, and vocational selection and 
guidance of employees. 

3c. Abnormal Psychology. A brief survey of the facts of feeble- 
mindedness and idiocy, inherited and acquired mental diseases and 
defects, as amnesia, abulia, delusions, hysteria, dementia, and others. 
Professor Edwards. 

5. Principles of Psychology. A systematic study of the adult nor- 
mal mind. Three hours a week throughout the year with a two- 
hour period of laboratory work. May be taken as a beginning course 
but not along with Psychology 1, and may be counted as a science in 
Group III. Professor Edwards. 

6. Experimental Psychology. An advanced course of laboratory 
work and conferences, the equivalent of a four-hour credit through- 
out the year. Prerequisite, Psychology 1, or 5. May be icounted as 
a science in Group III. Professor Edwards. 

7. Advanced Educational Psychology. A study of mental devel- 
opment, adolescence, individual differences, experimental education, 
the learning process, educational and mental tests and measure- 
ments, supervised study, and other phases of psychology applied to 
education. Three hours a week, the year. Professor Edwards. 



FRANKLIN COLLEGE 71 

20. Systematic Psychology. A graduate course. See Graduate 
School, Psychology 1. Professor Edwards. 

PHILOSOPHY 

3. Ethics. A study of human conduct, and the moral aspects of 
present day problems of society, democracy, and human life gen- 
erally. Three hours, first half-year. Professor , Professor 

Woofter. 

4. Introduction to Philosophy. Historical introduction, present- 
ing the great thinkers, the movements of thought, the essentials of 
logic and selected studies. Three hours, second half-year. Professor 



7. Modern Philosophy. A survey of modern thought with special 
studies of ideals of life expressed in philosophical and literary 
classics. Three hours, the year. Professor . 

9. Social Philosophy. Given with Sociology 9. Three hours, the 
year. Professor Heatwole. 

26. Advanced History of Philosophy. A graduate course. See 
Graduate School. Professor , Professor Woofter. 

SOCIOLOGY 

5. Social Evolution. An introduction to the study of society, 
through the approach of organic and social evolution; anthropol- 
ogy, heredity, morality, social organization, democracy, and other 
topics. Three hours, first half-year. Professor Woofter. 

6. Educational Sociology. Democracy the goal of social evolu- 
tion; spirit of modern democracy; education the agency of social 
inheritance; education in a democracy; 'the evolution of the school; 
modern educational doctrine. Three hours, second half-year. Pro- 
fessor Woofter. 

9. General Principles of Sociology. A study of inductive sociol- 
ogy, different social theories, current social problems, social statis- 
tics, and other topics of functional and applied sociology. Three 
hours, the year. Professor Heatwole. 

EDUCATION 

1. Introductory Educational Psychology. Elements of general 
and educational Psychology. Three hours, first half-year. Pro- 
fessor Edwards. 

2. History of Education. Tracing the influence of the past and 
examining modern theories and practices. Three hours, second half- 
year. Professor Heatwole, Professor . 

3. Principles of Teaching and Management; School Hygiene. 
Three hours, the year. Professor Heatwole. 

4. High School Organization and Teaching. Open to seniors. 



72 UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

Two hours per week the year, or as otherwise arranged. Professor 
Stewart, Professor . 

5. Social Evolution. An introduction to the development and the 
organization of society and democracy. Three hours, first half- 
year. Professor Woofter. 

6. Educational Sociology. A study of fundamental guiding prin- 
ciples of education in a democracy. Three hours, second half-year. 
Professor Woofter. 

7. Advanced Educational Psychology. Characteristics and stages 
of mental development, mental training, mental and educational 
tests and measurements, etc. Three hours, the year. Professor 
Edwards. 

8. Teaching Special Subjects: English, History, Mathematics, etc. 

9. Education in the United States; the needs of a democracy. 
Advanced educational history. Three hours, first half-year. Pro- 
fessor , Professor Woofter. 

10. The Administration and Supervision of Public Education. 
Three hours, second half-year. Professor . 

24. See Graduate School. 

25. See Graduate School. 

26. Principles of Education: Biological, Sociological, Psychologi- 
cal. Graduate course, Summer School. 

ROMANCE LANGUAGES 

1. French X is a course for beginners who are conditioned in 
French and wish to substitute both French and German for Greek. 
The course consists of careful drill in pronunciation, the rudiments 
of grammar and syntax, the study of regular and irregular verbs, 
dictation, easy exercises of translation from English into French, 
conversation, and the reading of about 275 duodecimo pages of easy 
prose. Three hours per week. 

2. French 1 consists of a study of grammatical difficulties, idioms, 
and provincialisms. Compositions and essays in French. Reading 
from 600 to 1,000 pages of prose and poetry. Continuation of trans- 
lation from English into French. Conversational French. Three 
hours per week. Optional for Freshmen. 

3. French 2 consists of the reading of from 1,000 to 2,000 pages 
of standard French, classical and modern; compositions and essays 
in French; translation from English into French; study of the 
classical writers, with parallel reading of some of their works; study 
of French Literature, through texts and lectures in French; conver- 
sational French. Three hours per week. Optional for Sophomores. 

4. French la is an elementary course offered as one of the Junior 
language options. In this course the various inflections, forms of 
words, verbs, regular and irregular, and constructions of sentences 



FRANKLIN COLLEGE 73 

are taught from the beginning, but systematic study of the grammar 
is not begun until the second half-year, at which time reading, 
translation, and writing of letters in French are also begun. About 
200 pages of easy French prose are read, and there is practice in 
conversational French. Three hours per week. Optional for Juniors. 
5. French 2# is a continuation of French la. It consists of a 
thorough study of grammar and syntax; translation from English 
into French; dictation; French composition; the reading in class of 
about 1,000 pages of standard authors, classical and modern; par- 
allel reading; and conversational French. Three hours per week. 
Optional for Seniors. 

Spanish 

1. Spanish X. The course consists of careful drill in pronuncia- 
tion, the rudiments of grammar and syntax, the study of regular 
and irregular verbs, dictation, easy exercises of translation from 
English into Spanish, conversation, and the reading of about 275 
duodecimo pages of easy prose. Three hours per week. 

2. Spanish 1. Study of grammatical difficulties, idioms, and pro- 
vincialisms. Compositions and essays in Spanish. Reading from 
600 to 1,000 pages of prose and poetry. Translation from English 
into Spanish. Three hours per week. 

3. Spanish 2. Reading from 1,000 to 2,000 pages of standard 
Spanish, classical and modern; compositions and essays in Spanish; 
translation from English into Spanish; study of the classical writers, 
with parallel reading of some of their works; study of Spanish lit- 
erature, through text and lectures in Spanish; conversational Span- 
ish. Three hours per week. 

4. Spanish la. A course similar to French la. 

5. Spanish 2a. A course similar to French 2a. 

Italian 

Three hours per week. A one year course is offered in this sub- 
ject. It is realized that a good reading knowledge of Italian can 
be acquired by properly prepared students in one year. With this 
in view, reading on preparation and at sight forms the bulk of the 
instruction. So much grammatical work is done as may be required 
for the attainment of this object. Italian grammar by Grandgent. 
Other texts may vary from year to year. 



74 UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE AND THE 

MECHANIC ARTS 



I. THE COLLEGE OF SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING 



STAFF OF INSTRUCTION 

D. C. BARROW, LL.D., Chancellor . 

A. M. SOULE, Sc.D., LL.D., President, and Dean of the College of 
Agriculture. 

H. C. WHITE, Ph.D., Sc.D., D.C.L., LL.D., Professor of Chemistry, 
and Terrell Professor of Agricultural Chemistry. 

C. M. STRAHAN, C. and M.E., Sc.D., Professor of Civil Engineering. 

J. H. T. McPHERSON, Ph.D., Professor of History and Political 
Science. 

C. M. SNELLING, A.M., Sc.D., Professor of Mathematics. 

W. D. HOOPER, A.M., Professor of Latin. 

J. MORRIS, A.M., Professor of Germanic Languages. 

J. LUSTRAT, Bach, es Lett., Professor of Romance Languages. 

R. E. PARK, Litt.D., Professor of English. 

T. J. WOOFTER, Ph.D., Professor of Philosophy and Education. 

J. S. STEWART, Ped.D., Professor of Secondary Education. 

S. V. SANFORD, Litt.D., Professor of English Language. 

L. L. HENDREN, Ph.D., Professor of Physics and Astronomy. 

J. M. READE, Ph.D., Professor of Botany. 

R. P. BROOKS, Ph.D., DeRenne Professor of Georgia History. 

C. J. HEATWOLE, M.S., Professor of Education. 

M. B. THWEATT, Professor of Military Science and Tactics. 

U. H. DAVENPORT, B.S., Associate Professor of Electrical Engin- 
eering. 

E. L. GRIGGS, Associate Professor of Civil Engineering. 

W. O. PAYNE, A.M., Associate Professor of History and Political 

Science. 
H. V. BLACK, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Chemistry. 
R. P. STEPHENS, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Mathematics. 
*A. S. EDWARDS, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Psychology. 
H. D. DOZIER, A.M., Associate Professor of Finance. 
S. M. SALYER, A.M., Associate Professor of English. 
L. H. GORK, Assistant Professor of Military Science and Tactics. 
R. L. McWHORTER, A.M., Adjunct Professor of Latin and Greek. 
R. S. POND, Ph.D., Adjunct Professor of Mathematics. 
R. P. WALKER, M.A., Adjunct Professor of English. 



* In the Government service. 



THE A. & M. COLLEGE 75 

*G. L. WILLIAMS, A.M., Adjunct Professor of Finance. 

W. C. GEORGE, Ph.D., Adjunct Professor of Zoology. 

R. W. RAMIREZ, A.B., Adjunct Professor of Romance Languages. 

W. T. WRIGHT, Adjunct Professor of Physics. 

*E. E. PEACOCK, M.B.A., Instructor in Accounting and Industry. 

ADMISSION OF WOMEN 

In view of the fact that a number of colleges for women in Geor- 
gia are doing creditable junior college work it is deemed wise at the 
present time to limit the admission of women students in the Col- 
lege of Agriculture and the Mechanic Arts to the junior and senior 
classes. For admission to the junior class it is necessary that the 
applicant be at least eighteen years of age, that she present fourteen 
units from an accredited high school or the equivalent thereof, and 
in addition, that she present thirty-six hours of standard college 
work. A candidate who presents thirty hours of standard college 
work may secure junior standing, that is, she may be admitted to 
the junior class in such courses as she is prepared to enter on condi- 
tion that she sustain herself in these courses and that she make 
up the six hours condition as early as possible. In addition to aca- 
demic preparation sufficient to carry the university work of the 
junior class the applicant must show sufficient maturity and poise 
to meet the requirements of university life. Qualifications of schol- 
arship, personality, and poise must be demonstrated within the first 
half of the junior year. Students making application for entrance 
into the junior class must submit on a blank furnished for the 
purpose their college credits for the first two years of work and 
this blank must be sent in for inspection at least six weeks prior to 
the opening of college. 

There will be a limited number of rooms available for women 
students whose major subject is not Home Economics in the resi- 
dence hall for women on the campus of the College of Agriculture. 
This residence hall will be thoroughly equipped with every modern 
convenience and will be under the direction of one of the women of 
the faculty. To secure reservation of room it is necessary to make 
application in advance accompanied by a deposit of $5.00. Students 
not residing in the dormitory must live in approved homes, (a list 
of which will be furnished upon application) and must be under all 
regulations which govern women who live on the campus. 

Special Students 

In view of the fact that mature students may wish to carry special 
courses for increasing professional skill or securing general culture 
without meeting the full entrance requirements of the University 



* In the Government service. 



76 UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

there is a provision that such women may be admitted as special 
students provided they are not less than twenty years of age and 
that they give evidence of adequate preparation to the individual 
professors in charge of the courses they wish to take. 

Address all communications of inquiry and applications to Miss 
Mary E. Creswell, Director, Division of Home Economics, State 
College of Agriculture, Athens, Ga. 



DEGREE 



In this College but one degree is given, that of Bachelor of Science. 
It is believed that this degree should be, in all cases, the certificate 
of satisfactory completion of a proper course of mental training 
which, although given by divers arrangements of studies, should be 
equally severe and, therefore, without discrimination as to title. 

The undergraduate degrees offered by the College of Science and 
Engineering are: Bachelor of Science (General) ; Bachelor of Science 
(Civil Engineering); Bachelor of Science (Electrical Engineering); 
Bachelor of Science (Architecture); Bachelor of Science (Com- 
merce); Bachelor of Science (Medicine). Options must be selected 
after conference with and with the consent of the President of the 
College. 

General provision, applicable to all courses and classes: In Physics, 
Chemistry, Botany, and Zoology laboratory work (two hours for 
one) may be substituted for lecture or recitation hours, at the option 
of the professor. One laboratory period of two hours per week is 
allowed for each course of three hours per week. 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE (General) 

Freshman Class 

Mathematics 1, 2, p. 66_ 3 

Phys'cs 1, p. 90 3 

Physiology (Zoology A), p. 83 ________ 3 

Graphics Dl, p. 86 2* 

English 1, p. 60 3 

Latin 1, p. 6 6 ] 

French 1, p. 72 _ [ One required _____ 3 

German 1, p. 62 

Spanish 1, p. 62 _ _ _ 

Georgia History, p. 64 1 

Military Science 1, p. 68 ___________ 1 

19 



THE A. & M. COLLEGE 



77 



Sophomore Class 

'Mathematics 3, 4, p. 67] 

Physics 4, p. 90 _ _ _ _ i Mathematics 
I Chemistry 2 & 2a, p. 83 [ and two other _ _ _ 9 

Zooology 3, p. 83 _ _ _ I required 

Botany 3, p. 82 J 

English 2, p. 60 3 

History 2 or 4, p. 64 3 

Latin 2, p. 66 ]| 

French 2, p. 72 _ _ _ _ ) One required _ 3 

| German 2, p. 62 

[Spanish 2, p. 73 

*The student must select one department from this group in 
which to take his "major" course. This consists of three three- 
hour courses in the same department, exclusive of Freshman courses, 
preferably begun in the Sophomore year and continued through the 
Junior and Senior, but in some departments a major may be com- 
pleted in two years by taking two courses in the same year. 

Selection of the major must be made (not later than the begin- 
ning of the Junior year and preferably earlier) after consultation 
with the head of the department chosen, who thereupon becomes 
the official adviser of the student and must be consulted in the 
selection of all his other subjects. A second department must be 
selected from the same group in which to complete a "minor" 
course, consisting of two three-^hour courses. 

Junior Class 

Mathematics 5 or 4a, 6, p. 67 __ _ 

Physics 4 or 5, p. 90 _ _ _ 

Chem. 2 and 2a, 3, 4, 5 or 8, p. 83 _ [Two required. 

Zoology 3 or 4, p. 83 _ . 

Botany, p. 82 _ _ _ _ . 

Psychology 5, p. 70 _ . 
| English Language 1, p. 61 _ _ _' 
B i French la, p. 72 _ _ _ j. One required. 

German la, p. 62 _ _ _ _ 

Spanish la, p. 73 _ 

f English 3, 4, 6 or 8, p. 60 _ _ _ _" 
I History 5, 6, or 11, p. 64 _ _ _ _ 

Ed. 1-2, 3, 4, 5-6, 7, or 9-10, p. 71 _ j- One required. 

Philosophy 3-4, 5-6, 7, or 9, p. 71 
| Economics 5 or 6-7, or 8, 9, or 
[ 10-14, or 11-15, or 16, p. 60 _ _ 

One free elective may be chosen from all courses offered in the 

University. 

Five three-hour courses required. 



78 



UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 



! 



[ One required. 



Senior Class 

f Mathematics 5, or any two of 7, 8, 9, p. 67] 

| Physics 4, or 5, or 6, p. 90_ _____ 

\ Chemistry 3, 4, 5, 8, or 9, p. 83 

Zoology 3, or 4, 5, or 6, 7, p. 83 _ _ _ _ 

Botany, p. 82 

Psychology 5, or 6, p. 70 

English Language 2, p. 61 ______ _ 

B <j French 2a, p. 72 

German 2a, p. 62 ____________ 

Spanish 2a, p. 73 _ _ _ _ _ j 

English 3, 4, 5, 6, or 11, p. 60 _ _ _ _ _ } 
History 5-6, or 8-9, or 10, or 11-12, p. 64 _ | 
C \ Education 1-2, 4, 5-6, or 10-11, p. 71 \ One required. 

| Philosophy 3-4, 5-6, 7, or 9, p. 71 . 

I Economics 5, or 6, 7, or 8, 9, or 10-14, or 

[ 11-15, or 16, p. 60 . 

One free elective may be chosen from all courses offered in the 
University. 

Five three-hour courses required. 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE (Civil Engineering) 

The degree o>f Bachelor of Science in Civil Engineering is given 
on completion of the four year course outlined below. The studies 
required have been chosen so that the student will receive a sound, 
broad mental development in addition to his special knowledge of 
engineering. The instruction in engineering subjects includes a 
large amount of field practice and office drafting and computation. 
Thorough application of principles to designing, laying out, and 
erecting engineering structures is required. 

Hrs. 
p. 85 _ 3 



Freshman 

Graphics Dl and D2, 

English 1, p. 60 

Georgia History, p. 6 3 



Hrs. 

6 _ 3 
_ _ 3 
_ _ 1 



Mathematics 1, 2, p. 66 _ _ _ 
Physics 1, p. 90 ______ _ 

French X or 1, p. 72 _] 
German X or 1, p. 62 _ I one 
Spanish X or 1, p. 73 _ J 
Military Science 1, p. 68 _ _ _ 



Sophomore 

Civil Engineering Al, 

Graphics D3, p. 86 . 

Physics 3, 4, p. 90 

Mathematics 3, 4, p. 67 _ _ _ 



Chemistry 
French 1, 
German 1 
Spanish 1 



2 and 2a, p. 
or 2, p 72 
or 2, p. 62 
or 2, p. 73 



83 _ _ 

-1 

_ )■ one 

-J 



17 
See note under Electrical Engineering. 



Junior Hrs. 

Chemistry 4, 5, or 8, p. 83 _ _ 3 
Civil Eng. B-l, & B-2, or B-3, 

p. 85 6 

Graphics D-4, p. 86 2 

Electrical Engineering 1, p. 

86 3 

Mathematics 5, p. 67 3 



18 



H»s. 



Senior 

Astronomy and Geology, 

p. 61, 69 3 

Civil Eng. C-1,-2,-3,-4, p. 86 _ 6 

Graphics D-5, p. 86 2 

Electrical Eng. 3, p. 88 3 

Mathematics 7, 9, p. 67 3 



17 



17 



THE A. & M. COLLEGE 



79 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE (Architectural Engineering) 



Freshman Hrs. 

Graphics D-l, and D-2, p. 86 _ 3 

English 1, p. 60 3 

Georgia History, p. 63 _ _ _ _ 1 
Mathematics 1, 2,p.66___3 

Physics 1, p. 90 3 

French X or 1, p. 72 _] 

German X or 1, p. 62 _ }• one 3 
Spanish X or 1, p. 73 _ J 

Military Science 1, p. 68 _ _ _ 1 



17 



Sophomore Hrs. 

Civil Engineering A-l, p. 85 _ 3 

Graphics D-3, p. 86 2 

Mathematics 3, 4, p. 67 3 

Physics 3, 4, p. 90 4 

Chemistry 2 and 2a, p. 83 _ _ 3 
French 1 or 2, p. 72 _] 

German 1 or 2, p. 62 _ J- one 3 
Spanish 1 or 2, p. 73 _ J 



See note under Electrical Engineering. 



Junior Hrs | 

Chemistry 4, 5, or 8, p .83 _ 3 
Mathematics 5, p. 67____3 

Graphics D-4, p. 86 2 

French la, p. 72; or German 

Iff, p. 62 3 

Architecture B-4, p. 86 3 

Civil Engineering B-l, p. 85 _ 3 



Senior Hrs. 

Astronomy and Geology, p. 69 3 

Graphics D-5, p. 86 2 

French la, p. 72; or German 

la, p. 62 2 

Civil Eng. C-l, 5, p. 86 _ 
Civil Eng. C-6, p. 87 
Civil Eng. C-3, p. 87 



_ _ 3 
_ _ 3 

_ _ _ 6 



17 17 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE (Electrical Engineering) 

The course in Electrical Engineering is especially designed to give 
to those who contemplate making this subject their life-work a 
broad and well-rounded academic training, supplemented by a course 
in Electrical Engineering proper, which is as full and thorough as 
the time allowed will permit. Students are strongly urged to lay a 
broad foundation for electrical work, and to finish their course at 
some higher institution, after which they are advised to enter the 
shops of some electrical company before entering upon their pro- 
fession. While some of the men trained here have entered upon a 
successful career in electrical work without studying further else- 
where, we believe the best and most lasting results will be obtained 
by following the plan outlined above. 



Freshman Hrs. 

Graphics D-l and D-2, p. 86 _ 3 

English 1, p. 60 3 

Georgia History, p. 63 _ _ _ 1 

Mathematics 1, 2, p. 66 _ _ _ 3 

Physics 1, p. 90 3 

French X or 1, p. 72 _ 1 

German X or 1, p. 62 _ j- one 3 
Spanish X or 1, p. 73 _J 

Military Science 1, p. 68 1 



Sophomore 



Hrs. 



Civil Eng. A-l, p. 85 3 

Graphics D-3, p. 86 2 

Mathematics 3, 4, p. 67 _ _ _ 3 

Physics 3, 4, p. 90 4 

Chemistry 2 and 2a, p. 83 _ _ 3 
French 1 or 2, p. 72 _ ] 

German 1 or 2, p. 62 _ [-one 3 
Spanish 1 or 2, p. 73 _ J 



17 



IS 



80 



UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 
Junior Hrs. Senior 



Hrs. 



Chemistry 4, 5, or 8, p. 83 3 

Civil Eng. B-l, and -2, or -3, 

p. 85 6 

Electrical Eng. 1, 2, p. 88 _ _ 5 

Mathematics, 5, p. 67 _ _ _ _ 3 



69 



Astronomy and Geology, p 

Civil Eng. C-1,-2, p. 86 

Graphics D-5, p. 86_____ 

Electrical Eng. 3, 4, p. 88 

Mathematics 7, 9, p. 67 



17 16 

Note: — For the degrees in Civil Engineering, Electrical Engineer- 
ing and Architectural Engineering: 

A student who offers no modern language for entrance must take 
two consecutive years in French, German, or Spanish. 

A student who offers one or more units of modern language for 
entrance and wishes to continue the same language will take the 
advanced course listed above in the language chosen. 

A student who offers two units of modern language for entrance 
will be permitted to take History 2 and English 2 in lieu of the two 
year language options. 

A student who chooses a language option must continue the same 
language through two years, except that when Spanish 2 can be 
taken in the Freshman year it may be followed by English 2 in the 
Sophomore year. 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE (Commerce) 

The degree of Bachelor of Science in Commerce is conferred on 
the completion of sixty-seven hours as suggested below or as ap- 
proved by the Director of the School of Commerce and the Dean 
of the University according to options stated. The entrance require- 
ments are stated on page 28. 



Freshman Hrs. 

English 1, p. 60 3 

Mathematics 1, 2, p. 66 3 

Foreign Language _____ 3 

Physics 1 or 2, p. 90 1 

Economics 1, History 2a, p. 63 3 

History 2, p. 63 3 

Military Science, p. 68 _ _ _ 1 

19 

Junior Hrs. 

Economics 6, 7, p. 60 _ _ _ _ 3 

Other approved economics _ _3 
Modern Language ______ 3 

Natural Science _______ 3 

Psychology 1, 2, p. 70 3 



Sophomore Hrs. 

English 2, p. 60 3 

Mathematics 4a, 6, or 3, 4, 

p. 67 3 

Modern Language 3 

History 4a (or 4) p. 63 3 

Economics 5, p. 60 _ _ _ _ _ 3 

Economics 16, p. 60 _ _ _ _ _ 3 



Senior 



18 
Hrs. 



Approved Economics _ _ _ _ C 
Economics, History, Political 
Science, Sociology, Educa- 
tion and other courses ap- 
proved for each student's 
programme _______9 



15 1«> 

Entrance Requirements 

Students are admitted to candidacy for the degree in Commerce 



THE A. & M. COLLEGE 81 

who have completed the following courses in an accredited high 

school or have otherwise been accorded credit in the University for 

the units specified: 

English _______ 3 units (or foreign lang.*) _ 3 units 

History ______ 2 units Other subjects _ _ _ 4.5 units 

Modern language _ _ 2 units (Or, other subjects- 3.5 units) 

Mathematics _ _ _ _ 2.5 units 

Language Requirements 

In addition to the entrance requirements specified above, a min- 
imum of nine hours of college work in language is required. The 
requirements may be fulfilled in the following ways: (1) nine hours 
of German, (2) nine hours of French, (3) three hours of French 
and six hours of Spanish, (4) three hours of Latin and six hours of 
Spanish, or (5) six hours of each of any two of German, French, 
and Spanish. Credit for additional language will be given those 
taking more than the language required, and students expecting to 
enter the field of foreign trade either in governmental service or as 
representatives of business houses are advised to take more than the 
minimum in the languages that will be required of them. 

A SIX- YEAR COMBINATION COURSE IX MEDICINE 

1. Two years to be taken in the Academic department at Athens, 
as follows: 

First Year (Freshman) Hrs. Second Year (Sophomore) Hrs. 

Mathematics 1, 2, p. 66 3 Zoology 4, 5, p. 83 _____ 4 

English 1, p. 60 3 Chemistry 3, p. 83 4 

History, p. 63 3 Physics 1 or 2, p. 90 _4 

Zoology 3, p. 83 _ _ 3 French 1 or 2, p. 72; or 

Chemistry 2 and 2a, p. 83 4 German 1 or 2, p. 6 2 3 

French X or 1, p. 72 ) Botany, p. 82; or 

German X or 1, p. 62 \ _ _ _ 3 Psychology, p. 70 3 

19 

Note: — Two units of foreign language are required for entran 
to the pre-medical courses. 

Course 1 taken in either language the first year is followed 1 
Course 2 in the same language in the second year. 

No course offered for entrance can be counted for the degree. 

2. Two years to be taken in the Medical Department at Augusta, 
comprising the first two years of the regular medical course. 

On the satisfactory completion of this four year course, the 
academic degree of Bachelor of Science in Medicine will be conferred. 

3. Two additional years to be taken in the Medical Department 
in Augusta completing the regular course leading to the degree of 
Doctor of Medicine, on the completion of which such degree will be 
conferred. 



Two of which must be in one language. 



82 UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

BIOLOGY 

Botany 

J. M. READE, Professor. 



W. C. WANG, Assistant. 

3. Introductory 7 Plant Biology. This is the complement of Zoology 
3, the two courses together constituting general biology. Three 
recitations and two hours laboratory work per week for three 
terms. Prerequisite for Botany 4, 5, 6, 9, and 11. 

4. Morphology. A comparative study in praticular of the groups 
leading to a land flora. Two recitations and four hours laboratory 
work per week for three terms. Botany 3 is prerequisite. 

5. Bacteria. Text: Morrey, Fundamentals of Bacteriology. Three 
recitations and two hours laboratory work per week for the first 
half-year. Botany 3 is prerequisite. 

5a. Water and Sewage. Two recitations and four hours labora- 
tory work per week for the second half-year. Botany 5 is pre- 
requisite. 

6. True Fungi. Two recitations and four hours laboratory work 
per week for three terms. Botany 3 is prerequisite. 

7. Phytopathology. Three recitations and four hours laboratory 
work per week for three terms. 

9. Physiology. A series of experiments with connected reading 
and reports. Six hours laboratory work and one conference hour 
per week for three terms. Botany 3 is prerequisite. 

11. Genetics. An introduction to the study of heredity. Three 
lectures or recitations per week for three terms. Botany 3 is pre- 
requisite. 

1. Agricultural Botany. A course similar to Botany 3 but with 
special reference to agriculture. Three recitations and two hours 
laboratory work per week for three terms. 

2. Local Flora. Practice in the recognition of common trees and 
herbs. Illustrated lectures on the classification of Angiosperms. 
Given only by special arrangement. 

A. Plants. A course for one-year students in agriculture. Three 
recitations per week for one term. 

B. Pharmaceutical Botany. Three recitations per week for one 
term. 



THE A. & M. COLLEGE 83 



Zooology 



W. C. GEORGE, Adjunct Professor. 

■, Assistant. 

3. Introductory Animal Biology. This is the complement of Bot- 
any 3, the two courses together constituting general biology. Three 
recitations and two hours laboratory work per week for three terms. 
Prerequisite, Zoology 4 and 5. 

4. Vertebrate Morphology. The various organ systems are stud- 
ied in detail, especial attention being given to the homologies found 
in 'the various vertebrate groups. Three recitations and two hours 
laboratory work per week for three terms. Prerequisite, Zoology 3. 

5. Histology and Embryology. The first two terms are devoted to 
practice in the general methods employed in making microscopical 
preparations and to a study of the histological structure of the' more 
important types of tissues and organs; the third term is devoted to 
the embryology of the frog and chick. Two recitations and at least 
four hours laboratory work per week. Prerequisite, Zoology 3. 

A. The Human Body. An introductory course for those not suf- 
ficiently prepared to enter Zoology 3. Three recitations or lectures 
per week for three terms. 

CHEMISTRY 

H. C. WHITE, Professor. 

H. V. BLACK, Associate Professor. 

C. B. SWETLAND, Instructor. 

The following courses are offered: 

1. Elementary Chemistry. Three hours per week of lectures and 
recitations and two laboratory periods, for three terms. Text: 
McPherson and Henderson, Elementary Study of Chemistry. 

2. Inorganic Chemistry; College Course. Three hours per week 
of lectures and recitations for three terms. Text: Alexander Smith, 
Greneral Chemistry. 

2a. Laboratory Course, to accompany Course 2. Two laboratory 
periods per week for three terms. 

2&. A more extensive Laboratory Course, also to accompany Course 
2. Four laboratory periods per week for three terms. 

3. Organic Chemistry; College Course. Three hours per week of 
lectures and recitations and two laboratory periods for three terms. 
Open to students who have completed Courses 2 and 2a or 2 and 2b. 
Text: Stoddard, Introduction to Organic Chemistry. 

4. Industrial (including Agricultural Chemistry). Three hours 
per week of lectures and recitations for three terms. Texts: Pro- 
fessor's Notes; Thorp, Industrial Chemistry, and Reference Texts. 



84 UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

5. Physical Chemistry. Three hours per week of lectures and 
recitations and two laboratory periods for three terms. Open to 
students who have completed 2 and 2a or 2 and 2b. 

8. Analytical Chemistry. About two-thirds of this course is de- 
voted to qualitative analysis, on the completion of which quanti- 
tative analysis is begun. Six laboratory periods per week for three 
terms. Open to students who have completed Courses 2 and 2a or 
2 and 26. Texts: W. A. Noyes, Qualitative Analysis; Morse, Exer- 
cises in Quantitative Chemistry. 

9. Analytical Chemistry. Quantitative. Continuing the work of 
Course 8, a thorough foundation is laid in the scientific principles 
of quantitative analysis, followed by more detailed work in the 
analysis of iron and steel, or iron ores, of fertilizers, or in metallur- 
gy and assaying, or in such other branches of analysis as the needs 
of the individual student may suggest. Open to students who have 
completed Course 8. Six laboratory periods per week for three terms. 

The following fees will be charged for chemicals used in the 
laboratories: In Courses 1, 2a, 2b, 3 and 5, $2.50; Courses 8 and 9, 
$10.00. Necessary apparatus is furnished the student and breakage 
must be paid for at the end of the course. 

Four lecture rooms and nine laboratories, appropriately furnished 
and equipped, are provided in Terrell Hall, which is occupied ex- 
clusively by the Schools of Chemistry and Pharmacy. 

CIVIL ENGINEERING 

C. M. STRAHAN, Professor. 

E. L. GRIGGS, Associate Professor. 

The School of Civil Engineering offers instruction in the various 
branches of Civil Engineering, Architecture, and Graphics, and en- 
deavors to aid students in becoming skillful draftsmen, accurate 
surveyors, careful designers, and practical constructors. The in- 
struction by text-book and lectures is supplemented by a large 
amount of field practice, laboratory and draughting room exercises, 
and original investigation and essays. 

The courses in this department lead to the degree of Bachelor of 
Science in Civil Engineering and Architectural Engineering. Upon 
satisfactory completion of partial courses, certificates will be issued 
to students, covering the work done. It is not deemed advisable at 
present to create a special degree in Highway Engineering, but with 
the approval of the Faculty mature students completing special work 
in highway construction will be given certificates thereon. 



THE A. & M. COLLEGE 85 

Civil Engineering Courses 

A-l. Elementary Surveying. A course covering the use, care, and 
adjustment of surveying instruments, methods of surveying by 
chain alone, by compass, and by transit; the methods of platting 
and computing areas, and volumes; the variation of the magnetic 
needle; problems in parting off and dividing lands; the use of the Y 
level and precise leveling; plane ta l ble and stadia surveying, and the 
use of the solar transit. Three hours per week. Required of Soph- 
omores in all Engineering courses. Text: Breed and Hosmer's 
Surveying. Professor Griggs. 

B.-l. Materials of Construction. A course of lectures and labora- 
tory work covering the occurrence, preparation, and manufacture of 
the important structural materials, to-wit: lumber, its seasoning, 
inspection, and preservative treatment; stone, natural and artificial, 
including brick, terra cotta, cements, concrete blocks, etc.; the 
metals, including iron, wrought iron, steel, copper, tin, lead, zinc, 
aluminum, and alloys as used by engineers; uniting materials, cover- 
ing limes, mortars, cements, bituminous binders, joinery, riveting, 
etc. First and second terms. The third term is given to Founda- 
tions and Masonry structures, the course being based on Baker's 
Masonry Construction. Three hours per week. Required of Juniors 
in all Engineering courses. Professor Sti'ahan. 

B-2. Railroad Engineering. A course covering reconnoissance, 
preliminary and location surveys, curves, spirals, switches, etc., 
cross-sectioning, computations and estimates, railroad economics 
and the various other problems involved in the complete engineering 
of railways. Three hours per week. Optional for Juniors in Civil 
and Electrical Engineering. Text: Allen's Railroad Curves and 
Earthwork. Lectures. Professor Stratum. 

B-3. Highway Engineering. A course of lectures, laboratory and 
field problems covering the surveys, location, drainage, grading and 
surfacing of public highways and city streets. The preparation of 
maps, profiles, and estimates. Paving methods and specifications. 
Road finances, equipment, and labor. Three hours per week. Op- 
tional for Juniors in Civil and Electrical Engineering. Professor 
Strahan. 

B-4. Elements of Architecture. A course of lectures and prob- 
lems covering the classical orders, Gothic and Romanesque Forms. 
Sketches from memory required. Parallel reading and essays on 
the history of architecture. References: Hamlin, Fletcher, Fergu- 
son. Three hours per week. Required of Juniors in Architectural 
Engineering. Professor Strahan. 

C-l. Applied Mechanics. A course covering the fundamental 
principles of stresses and strains, the effect of forces and moving 



86 UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

loads upon framed and masonry structures, the elastic resistances 
of materials and the principles governing structural design of 
bridges, roofs, arches. First and second terms. Three hours per 
week. Required of Seniors in all Engineering courses. Text: Lan- 
za's Applied Mechanics. Professor Strahan. 

C-2. Hydraulics. A course in theoretical and practical hydraulics 
covering hydrostatics and hydrodynamics. Measurements of velocity 
and discharge, weirs, nozzles, orifices, meters, turbines, stream flow, 
etc., and the utilization of streams for power purposes. First term. 
Three hours per week. Required of Seniors in Civil and Electrical 
Engineering courses. Text: Russell's Hydraulics. Lectures. Pro- 
fessor Strahan. 

C-3. Bridges, Arches, and Reinforced Concrete. A course cover- 
ing bridges and arch and concrete masonry design. A practical 
course of lectures and design problems on highway bridges, rein- 
forced arch bridges, culverts, and bridge inspection. Three hours 
per week. Second and third terms. Required of Seniors in Civil 
Engineering course. Professor Strahan. 

C-4. Water Supply and Sewerage. A course of lectures and prob- 
lems on water supply, sewerage, garbage disposal, etc., including 
the methods of sewerage purification. Parallel reading: Hazen, 
Fuertes, Hering, and current reports. Third term. Three hours per 
week. Required of Seniors in Civil Engineering. Optional in other 
Engineering courses. 

C-5. Heating and Ventilation. A course covering the various 
methods of heating and ventilation including low pressure and high 
pressure steam, the vapor system, hot air furnaces, direct and indi- 
rect radiation, etc. Third term. Three hours per week. Required 
of Seniors in Architectural Engineering. Text: Baldwin, Heating 
and Ventilation. Lectures. Professor Griggs. 

C-6. Architectural Design. A course in designing modern struc- 
tures, with necessary plans, elevations, sections, and detail drawings, 
with specifications. Simpler problems are given leading up to more 
complex masonry structures. Four hours per week, including ex- 
tension of Reinforced Concrete under C-3. Required of Seniors in 
Architectural Engineering. Professor Griggs. 

Courses in Graphics 
D-l. Elementary Graphics. The first part of this course includes 
the construction of simple geometrical figures, designed to teach the 
use of the instruments and habits of neatness and precision. The 
work in projection follows. The course is illustrated by models, 
and written examinations are held at intervals. Practice in letter- 
ing is given throughout the course. With this course are given 
also two hours per week of free-hand drawing. Two hours per week. 



THE A. & M. COLLEGE 87 

Required of all B.S. Freshmen. Text: "Elements of Drawing," 
Strahan and Griggs. Professor Griggs. 

D-2. A course covering tracing and blue-printing, details of fram- 
ing, riveting members, trestles, bridges, etc., according to standard 
symbols used in shop and construction drawings. One hour per 
week. Required of Freshmen applying for any of the Engineering 
degrees. Professor Griggs. 

D-3. Descriptive Geometry. This course is open to students who 
have taken Course D-l or its equivalent. The problems are both 
demonstrated and drawn on uniform plates neatly lettered. Inter- 
sections of solids, shades and shadows are studied. Original prob- 
lems are given. Two hours per week. Required of Sophomores in 
Engineering courses. Text: Phillips and Millar. Professor Griggs. 

D-4. Advanced Graphics. This course include Topographical 
maps of field surveys showing full details, measured drawings of 
buildings, principles of mathematical perspective with problems and 
an elaborate rendered perspective of same building. Two hours per 
week. Required of Juniors in Civil and Architectural Engineering 
courses. Professor Griggs. 

D-5. Graphic Statics and Structural Design. A course in deter- 
mination of stresses in structures by graphic methods and in design- 
ing steel structures, such as built girders, knee-braced roof trusses, 
and pin-connected bridge truss. Text: Lecture Notes, Thompson's 
Bridge and Structural Design. Two hours per week. Required of 
Seniors in all Engineering courses. Professor Strahan. 

Special United States Survey Course. A course for applicants for 
positions in the various Government Survey Corps. Two hours per 
week. Open to special students sufficiently prepared in the general 
engineering subjects. 

Graduate Courses. For the degrees of Civil Engineer and Civil 
and Mining Engineer the applicant pursues advanced courses, having 
in view the special branch of the profession which he intends to 
follow. Original investigation is made a prominent feature of these 
courses. 

Note: — For schedule of studies leading to the degree of Bachelor 
of Science in Civil Engineering, see page — . 

Good Roads Department 

This department of the School of Civil Engineering has been 
organized for the purpose of giving direct instruction and field 
assistance to the road authorities of the counties of Georgia. The 
Trustees have recognized the importance of the road movement and 
have added an experienced officer to the staff of the School in order 
that special courses of instruction may be given at the University, 
and that upon request of county officials, visits for advice and dem- 



88 UNIVERSITY OP GEORGIA 

onstration may be made to counties requesting them. By writing 
to any of the officers of the School of Engineering, full informa- 
tion and blank forms of application for assistance may be obtained. 

Advice and Assistance. The visits to counties are made free of 
charge except where the service rendered is of long duration, and 
then the traveling and field expenses of the officer are the only cost. 

Laboratory Examination of Road Materials. This department has 
established a road material laboratory for the examination of sand- 
clay, top-soil, gravel, and similar road building materials. Samples 
sent by county road authorities will be examined free of charge and 
report made indicating the suitability of the material for surfacing 
roads. Send for printed instructions on how to take such samples. 

County road officials are invited to come to the University or write 
to the department at any time when they desire information or 
assistance and when the number of applicants justifies it courses of 
study will be arranged for such county officials and other mature 
special students. 

ECONOMICS 

A complete description of these courses is contained in the an- 
nouncement of the School of Commerce. 

ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING 

U. H. DAVENPORT, Associate Professor. 

1. Electrical Machinery and Apparatus. A study of the theory 
of direct currents and their application to electrical machinery and 
engineering auxiliaries — meters, storage batteries, transmission 
lines, distribution systems, electric lights, etc. Three lectures and 
quiz periods and one double period in the dynamo laboratory each 
week. The course includes also a large number of problems, which 
all students are required to work and file each week for grading by 
the instructor. Text: Franklin & Esty's "Elements of Electrical 
Engineering — Direct Currents," and Franklin & Esty's Dynamo Lab- 
oratory Manual, Vol. I. Required of Juniors in the Civil Engin- 
eering, and the Electrical Engineering courses. 

2. Mechanical Engineering of Power Plants. A study of Prime 
Movers and Power Plant Auxiliaries — steam engines and boilers, 
steam turbines, gas and oil engines, waterwheels and windmills, 
condensers, economizers, feed water heaters, pumps, piping, etc. A 
limited amount of laboratory work with steam, gas, and gasoline 
engines will be required. The course will include visits to plants 
where the various types of prime movers will be found in operation. 
Certain installations, typical of the best modern practice, both steam 
and hydraulic, will be studied from available detail drawings, and, 
if possible, by visits to the plants. Two hours per week. Required 
of Juniors in the Electrical Engineering course. 



THE A. & M. COLLEGE 89 

3. Electrical Machinery and Apparatus — Alternating Currents. 

A continuation of Course 1. A study of the theory of alternating 
currents and their application to electrical machinery and engineer- 
ing auxiliaries; transformers, meters, lights, transmission lines, dis- 
tributing systems, etc. Three lectures and quiz periods and one 
double period in the laboratory each week. The course includes 
also a large number of problems, which all students are required to 
work and file each week for grading by the instructor. Text: Frank- 
lin & Esty's "Elements of Electrical Engineering — Alternating Cur- 
rents," and Karapetoff's Experimental Electrical Engineering. Re- 
quired of Seniors in the Civil Engineering and the Electrical Engin- 
eering courses. 

4. Electrical Engineering of Power Plants. A study of the mar- 
ket conditions causing a demand for electrical power, the natural 
source of energy available, the most economic and satisfactory meth- 
ods of developing it, transforming it into electrical energy, trans- 
mitting it to the market, and distributing it to the consumer. A 
detailed study of the power plant equipment, including standard 
switchboard construction and special wiring problems will be made. 
High tension, long distance transmission line phenomena will be 
studied and transmission line calculations will be made. Typical 
installation, both hydro-electric and steam-electric, will be studied 
in detail and visits will be made to such plants as are available for 
study. Construction drawing and diagrams of these plants will be 
used where they are available. Three hours per week. Required 
of Seniors in Electrical Engineering course. 

ENGLISH 

For courses see page 60. 

GEOLOGY 

For courses see page 62. 

GERMANIC LANGUAGES 

For courses see page 62. 

HISTORY AND POLITICAL SCIENCE 

For courses see page 6 3 

JOURNALISM 

For courses see page 6 5. 

LATIN 

For courses see page 6 6. 

MATHEMATICS 

For courses see page 66. 

MILITARY SCIENCE 

For courses see page 68. 



90 UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

PHYSICS AND ASTRONOMY 

L. L. HENDREN, Professor. 

W. T. WRIGHT, Adjunct Professor. 

Physics 1, Elementary Physics. Three hours per week recitation 
and two hours per week laboratory work throughout the year. Re- 
quired of B.S. students. 

Physics la. Physical Measurements. A laboratory course of two 
hours per week to accompany or supplement Physics 1 or Physics 2. 

Physics 3. A brief course offered primarily for the Engineering 
students and designed to accompany and supplement Physics 4. 
During the first term the time will be devoted to a study of the 
theory and use of the Slide Rule and to the solution of problems in 
Mechanics. The second and third terms will be devoted to a study 
of Heat with especial emphasis on those topics which have an appli- 
cation to Engineering. Required of all Sophomore B.S. Engineering 
students. One hour per week throughout the year. 

Physics 4, Mechanics and Electricity. A second year college course. 
The first term will be devoted to Mechanics and the second and third 
terms to Electricity. In the third term work in Electricity especial 
emphasis will be laid upon the newer developments of Electricity, 
such as the Electron Theory and the properties of electro-magnetic 
waves ((wireless telegraphy). Three hours per week recitation and 
two hours per week laboratory work throughout the year. Required 
of all Sophomore B.S. Engineering students; optional for B.S. Gen- 
eral Sophomores, Juniors and Seniors. Prerequisite, the satisfactory 
completion of Physics 1 or 2 and Mathematics 1-2. 

Physics 5, Heat, Sound and Light. A course of the same grade 
as Physics 4, and covering those parts of General Physics not studied 
in Physics 4. Courses 4 and 5 together are designed to give the 
student a somewhat thorough survey of the experimental data and 
analytical processes upon which the great generalizations in Physics 
rest. Three hours per week recitation and two hours per week 
laboratory work throughout the year. Optional fo rB.S. General 
Juniors and Seniors. 

Physics 6. Advanced Electricity, Discharge of Electricity througk 
Gases, Radioactivity. Three hours per week lecture and recita- 
tion work throughout the year with some individual laboratory work. 
Optional for B.S. General Seniors. (Not offered 1918-19). 

Astronomy 1. Lectures and recitations designed to give a general 
knowledge of Astronomy. Opportunity will be given for observa- 
tions with a good 3% -inch telescope. Three hours per week for the 
first half-year. Optional for B.S. General Seniors. Required of B.S. 
Engineering Seniors. 

Note: — A laboratory fee of three dollars is required for Physics 
1, 2, 4 and 5. 



THE A. & M. COLLEGE 91 

PSYCHOLOGY, PHILOSOPHY, AND EDUCATION 

T. J. WOOFTER, Dean. 
J. S. STEWART, Professor. 
A. S. EDWARDS, Professor. 
C. J. HEATWOLE, Professor. 
, Professor. 

Note: — The following courses are open to general election. For 
fuller description of these courses, see the subsequent announce- 
ment of the Peabody School of Education. 

For Teachers Professional License, elect three courses in Educa- 
tion from 1-2, 3, 4-8, 5-6, 7, 9-10. 

PSYCHOLOGY 

1. Elementary Psychology. An introductory course covering the 
essentials of general and educational psychology. First half-year. 
Professor Edwards. 

This may be followed by Psychology 3 or Education 1 the sec- 
ond half-year. 

3. Applied Psychology. Topics will be selected each year, mainly 
from the following, Psychology 1 or 5 being prerequisite: 

3a. Social and Business Psychology. A brief review of social 
psychology and an application of psychological principles and men- 
tal tests to problems of advertising and salesmanship. 

3b. Legal and Vocational Psychology. A study of psychological 
problems involved in law, everyday life, and vocational selection 
and guidance of employees. 

3c. Abnormal Psychology. A brief survey of the facts of feeble- 
mindedness and idiocy, inherited and acquired mental diseases and 
defects, as amnesia, abulia, delusions, hysteria, dementia, and oth- 
ers. Professor Edwards. 

5. Principles of Psychology. A systematic study of the adult nor- 
mal mind. Three hours a week throughout the year with a two- 
hour period of laboratory work. May be taken as a beginning course 
but not along with Psychology 1, and may be counted as a science 
in Group III. Professor Edwa?-ds. 

6. Experimental Psychology. An advanced course of laboratory 
work and conferences, the equivalent of a four-hour credit through- 
out the year. Prerequisite, Psychology 1, or 5. May be counted as 
a science in Group III. Professor Edwards. 

7. Advanced Educational Psychology. A study of mental devel- 
opment, adolescence, individual differences, experimental education, 
the learning process, educational and mental tests and measure- 
ments, supervised study, and other phases of psychology applied to 
education. Three hours a week, the year. Professor Edwards. 



92 UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

20. Systematic Psychology. A graduate course. See Graduate 
School, Psychology 1. Professor Edwards. 

PHILOSOPHY 

3. Ethics. A study of human conduct, and the moral aspects of 
present day problems of society, democracy, and human life gener- 
ally. Three hours, first half-year. Professor , Professor 

Woofter. 

4. Introduction to Philosophy. Historical introduction, presenting 
the great thinkers, the movements of thought, the essentials of logic 
and selected studies. Three hours, second half-year. Professor 



7. Modern Philosophy. A survey of modern thought with special 
studies of ideals of life expressed in philosophical and literary 
classics. Three hours the year. Professor . 

9. Social Philosophy. Given with Sociology 9. Three hours, the 
year. Professor Eeatwole. 

2 6. Advanced History of Philosophy. A graduate course. See 
Graduate School. Professor , Professor Woofter. 

SOCIOLOGY 

5. Social Evolution. An introduction to the study of society, 
through the approach of organic and social evolution; anthropology, 
heredity, morality, social organization, democracy, and other topics. 
Three hours, first half-year. Professor Woofter. 

6. Educational Sociology. Democracy the goal of social evolution; 
spirit of modern democracy; education the agency of social inherit- 
ance; education in a democracy; the evolution of the school; mod- 
ern educational doctrine. Three hours, second half-year. Professor 
Woofter. 

9. General Principles of Sociology. A study of inductive sociol- 
ogy, different social theories, current social problems, social statis- 
tics, and other topics of functional and applied sociology. Three 
hours, the year. Professor Heatwole. 

EDUCATION 

1. Introductory Educational Psychology. Elements of general and 
educational Psychology. Three hours, first half-year. Professor 
Edwards. 

2. History of Education. Tracing the influence of the past and 
examining modern theories and practices. Three hours, second half- 
year. Professor /Irutwolc, Professor . 

3. Principles of Teaching and Management; School Hygiene. 
Three hours, the year. Professor J/caficole. 

4. High School Organization and Teaching. Open to Seniors. 



THE A. & M. COLLEGE 93 

Two hours per week, the year, or as otherwise arranged. Professor 
Stewart, Profsesor . 

5. Social Evolution. An introduction to the development and the 
organization of society and democracy. Three hours, first half- 
year. Professor Woofter. 

6. Educational Sociology. A study of fundamental guiding prin- 
ciples of education in a democracy. Three hours, second half-year. 
Professor Woofter. 

7. Advanced Educational Psychology. Characteristics and stages 
of mental development, mental training, mental and educational 
tests and measurements, ets. Three hours, the year. Professor 
Edwards. 

8. Teaching Special Subjects: English. History. Mathematics, etc. 

9. Education in the United States; the needs of a democracy. 
Advanced educational history. Three hours, first half-year. Pro- 
fessor , Professor Woofter. 

10. The Administration and Supervision of Public Education. 
Three hours, second half-year. Professor . 

20. See Graduate School. 

25. Principles of Education: Biological, Sociological, Psycholog- 
ical. Graduate course, Summer School. 

VOCATIONAL, EDUCATION 

The following are special courses for Smith-Hughes students. 
See Division of Agricultural Education , College of Agriculture: 

Education X. Vocational Educational Psychology and Principles 
of Teaching. Three hours, the year. Professor Eeatwolr. 

Education Y. Rural Sociology and Rural Economics. Three hours, 
the year. Professor Eeaticole. 

Education Z. School Administration and Supervision. Half year. 
Professor . 



State College of Agriculture of the 
University of Georgia 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES 

From the Trustees of the University 

JOHN W. BENNETT, Waycross, 

11th Congressional District, Term expires Aug. 13, 1922. 
JAMES E. HAYES, Montezuma, 

3rd Congressional District, Term expires Aug. 13, 19 24. 
DUDLEY M. HUGHES, Danville, 

12th Congressional District, Term expires Aug. 13, 1919. 

From the Experiment Station Board 

LAMARTINE G. HARDMAN, Commerce, 

9th Congressional District, Term expires Aug. 13, 1920. 

JOHN J. BROWN, Atlanta, 

Commissioner of Agriculture, Term expires June 26, 1919. 

ROBERT C. NEELY, Waynesboro, 

1st Congressional District, Term expires Aug. 13, 1922. 

From the State at Large 

JAMES J. CONNER, Cartersville, 

7th Congressional District, Term expires Aug. 13, 1924. 

JOHN W. CALLAHAN, Bainbridge, 

2nd Congressional District, Term expires Aug. 13, 1922. 

GEORGE GILMORE, Warthen, 

10th Congressional Listrict, Term expires Aug. 13, 1922. 

JOHN A. GASTON, Greenville, 

4th Congressional District, Term expires Aug. 13, 19 24. 

LUCIUS L. McMULLAN, Hartwell, 

8th Congressional District, Term expires Aug. 13, 1922. 

OFFICCERS OF THE BOARD 

JAMES J. CONNER, President. 

T. W. REED, Secretary and Treasurer. 

ANDREW M. SOULE, Assistant Secretary. 

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

Messrs. Hardman, McMullan and Hayes. 



THE COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 9 5 

State College of Agriculture 

OF THE UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 



ADMINISTRATIVE, TECHNICAL AND EXTENSION STAFF 



DAVID C. BARROW, LL.D., Chancellor. 

ANDREW McNAIRN SOULE, B.S.A., Sc.D., F.R.S.A., LL.D., Pres- 
ident. 

JOHN RICHARD FAIN, B.S., Professor of Agronomy. 

MILTON PRESTON JARNAGIN, B.S.A., Professor of Animal Hus- 
bandry. 

THOMAS HUBBARD McHATTON, B.S., Sc.D., Professor of Horti- 
culture. 

LEROY COLLIER HART, B.S., E.E., Professor of Agricultural 
Engineering. 

WILLIAM ARCHER WORSHAM, Jr., B.S., A.M., Professor of Agri- 
cultural Chemistry. 

THOMAS WALTER REED, A.M., Registrar. 

WILLIAM MILLS BURSON, D.V.M., Professor of Veterinary Med- 
icine. 

t* JAMES PHILANDER CAMPBELL, B.S.A., Director of Extension. 

JAMES BERTHOLD BERRY, B.S.F., M.S., Professor of Plant Pathol- 
ogy and Forestry. 

MARY E. CRESWELL, Director of Home Economics. 

•LEONIDAS MYERS CARTER, B.S., Junior Professor, Soil Chem- 
istry. 

♦DAVID D. LONG, B.S.A., Soil Expert in State Survey. 

GEORGE ARTHUR CRABB, B.S.A., Junior Professor of Agronomy, 
in Charge of Soils. 

t*JOHN KYGRESS GILES, B.S.A., State Supervisor, Agricultural 
Clubs. 

ft JOHN WILLIAM FIROR, B.S., Junior Professor of Horticulture. 

LOY EDMUND RAST, B.S., Junior Professor of Agronomy, in 
Charge of Cotton Industry. 

ETHEL REESE, Secretary to the President. 

♦MARION WAYNE LOWRY, B.S.A., M.A., Junior Professor of Soil 
Chemistry. 

JOHN TAYLOR WHEELER, B.S., Professor of Agricultural Edu- 
cation. 



* In Extension Service. 

t In Cooperation with U. S. D. A. 

t On leave of absence in army service. 



96 UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

ROBERT D. MALTBY, B.S., State Supervisor of Vocational Agri- 
culture. 

t* JAMES ELKANAH DOWNING, Assistant State Supervisor Pig 
Clubs. 

•[♦ROSS RENFROE CHILDS, B.S., M.S., Scientific Assistant in 
Agronomy. 

♦SILAS H. STARR, B.S.A., Junior Professor of Farm Management 

♦EDISON COLLINS WESTBROOK, B.S.A., Field Agent in Agron- 
omy. 

EARL G. WELCH, B.S.A.E., Junior Professor in Agricultural En- 
gineering. 

t* WILLIAM BRADFORD, A.B., M.D., Assistant State Supervisor 
Agricultural Clubs. 

t*ROSS McKINNEY GRIDLEY, B.S.A., Field Agent in Animal Hus- 
bandry. 

t* WILLIAM HARRY HOWELL, B.S.A., Extension Dairy Husband- 
man. 

♦-j-LOIS P. DOWDLE, Assistant State Supervisor Home Economics. 

♦PAUL TABOR, B.S.A., M.S., Field Agent in Agronomy. 

■{•♦MRS. BESSIE STANLEY WOOD, Assistant State Supervisor Home 
Economics. 

PHARES OBADIAH VANATTER, Superintendent Field Experi- 
ments. 

AMBROSE PENN WINSTON, Foreman of College Farm. 

t ♦MILTON CLEVELAND GAY, B.S.A., Field Agent in Marketing. 

♦HENRY TOWNS MADDUX, A.B., B.S.A., Editor. 

JULIUS EUGENE SEVERIN, D.V.M., Junior Professor of Veterinary 
Medicine. 

WALTER CLINTON BURKHART, D.V.M., Junior Professor of Vet- 
erinary Medicine. 

LAFAYETTE MILES SHEFFER, B.S., Junior Professor of Agricul- 
tural Education. 

t ♦JAMES G. OLIVER, Assistant State Supervisor County Agents. 

f ♦GEORGE VIVIAN CUNNINGHAM, Assistant State Supervisor 
County Agents. 

t ♦JAMES VERNON PHILLIPS, B.S., Senior Drainage Engineer. 

■[♦HARRY LOWRANCE BROWN, B.S.A., Scientific Assistant in 
Animal Husbandry. 

-[♦WILLARD H. ALLEN, B.S., Field Agent, Poultry Clubs. 

tf ♦GERALD ROSCOE SKINNER, B.S.A., Scientific Assistant in 
Dairy Husbandry. 



♦ In Extension Service. 

t In Cooperation with U. S. D. A. 

t On leave of absence in army service. 



THE COLLEGE OR AGRICULTURE 97 

♦ROBERT E. BLACKBURN, B.S.A., M.S., Field Agent in Horticul- 
ture. 

♦ROBERT E. BLACKBURN, B.S.A., Field Agent in Horticulture. 

HARLOW WILLIAMSON HARVEY, B.S.A., Junior Professor of 
Horticulture. 

ROBERT C. WILSON, Ph.G., Professor of Pharmacy and Materia 
Medica. 

ERNA E. PROCTOR, Junior Professor of Foods and Cookery. 

ROSALIE V. RATHBONE, B.S., Junior Professor of Textiles and 
Clothing. 

♦CHARLES A. PYLE, B.S.A., D.V.M., Field Veterinarian. 

•(•♦EARL S. BRASHIER, B.S.A., D.V.M., Hog Cholera Specialist. 

$f*GUY RUDOLPH JONES, B.S.A., Field Agent in Agricultural 
Engineering. 

♦LAURA BLACKSHEAR, Illustrator. 

JJAMES HERBERT WOOD, B.S.A., Adjunct Professor of Poultry 
Husbandry. 

NELLE M. REESE, Librarian. 

HANCEL W. CALDWELL, B.S.A., D.V.M., Junior Professor of Vet- 
erinary Medicine. 

T. GEORGE YAXIS, B.S., M.S. A., Junior Professor of Animal Hus- 
bandry. 

tWILLIAM S. DILTS, B.S., Instructor in Poultry Husbandry. 

WILLIAM OLIN COLLINS, B.S.A., Instructor in Agricultural Chem- 
istry. 

♦WILLIAM E. BROACH, B.S.A., Field Agent in Agricultural En- 
gineering. 

■{-♦CHARLES A. MARTINI, B.S.A., M.S., Field Agent in Animal Hus- 
bandry. 

f # CHARLES E. KELLOGG, B.S., M.S.A., Assistant Field Agent, 
Beef Cattle. 

t + HARRISON B. EMERSON, B.S.A., Field Agent in Beef Cattle. 

| ♦WALKER R. NISBET, B.S., Assistant Field Agent in Beef Cattle. 

t # LEO H. MARLATT, Field Agent in Cheese Factories. 

f ♦WILLIAM J. CLARKE, Extension Sheep Specialist. 

■{•♦CARL WALLACE, Extension Swine Husbandman. 

♦ROBERT FRED WHELCHEL, B.S.A., Supervisor of Extension 
Schools. 

♦L. VINCENT DAVIS, B.S.A., Field Agent in Agronomy. 

f^DeF. HUNGERFORD, Scientific Assistant in Farm Management. 

♦FRANK WARD, B.S.A., Field Agent in Cotton Industry. 



♦ In Extension Service. 

t In Cooperation with U. S. D. A. 

t On leave of absence in army service. 



9 8 UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

t*LOUIS A. ZIMM, B.S., M.F., Extension Forester. 

CECIL NORTON WILDER, B.S.A., Instructor in Agricultural Chem- 
istry. 

f *RAY C. HARRIS, B.S.A., Field Agent in Farm Drainage. 

f* WILLIAM ALEXANDER SMITH, Field Agent in Bee Husbandry. 

f *SAMUEL E. McCLENDON, Field Agent in Horticulture. 

MAUDE SMITH, Instructor in Poultry Husbandry. 

♦EVA L. McGEE, Field Agent in Dairying. 

t*NEWTON C. BRACKETT, B.S.A., Specialist in Smut Eradication. 

f ♦THOMAS L. ASBURY, B.S.A., District Supervisor of County 
Agents. 

t ♦CHARLES S. BRYANT, B.S.A., District Supervisor of County 
Agents. 

f* JAMES A. JOHNSON, B.S.A., District Supervisor of County 
Agents. 

t* WALTER S. BROWN, B.S.A., District Supervisor of County 
Agents. 

f *ELMO RAGSDALE, B.S.A., District Supervisor of County Agents. 

f*ROBT. P. HOWARD, B.S.A., District Supervisor of County Agents. 

f*E. R. STRAHAN, B.S.A., District Supervisor of County Agent3. 

t*BESSIE BOGGESS, Assistant State Supervisor of Home Eco- 
nomics. 

f*MRS. EDITH M. ANDREWS, District Supervisor of Home Eco- 
nomics. 

f*MRS. HOYLE S. WILSON, District Supervisor of Home Eco- 
nomics. 

t*MRS. E. G. BOND, District Supervisor of Home Economics. 

f*KATIE D. LANIER, District Supervisor of Home Economics. 

t*ESTELLE BOZEMAN, District Supervisor of Home Economics. 

f *GEORGIA CREWS, District Supervisor of Home Economics. 

t*MRS. LEILA R. MIZE, District Supervisor of Home Economics. 

CHARLES B. SWEET, Foreman of Greenhouse and Grounds. 

OLIVE BELL, Clerk and Stenographer. 

ANNIE MAE PENLAND, Clerk and Stenographer. 

*MRS. E. T. EPPS, Clerk and Stenographer. 

♦AGNES HADDOCK, Clerk and Stenographer. 

♦MRS. MAY THORNTON, Mailing Clerk. 

♦MYRA WILHITE, Multigraph Operator. 

♦FERN THOMPSON, Clerk and Stenographer. 

♦MAGGIE DuBOSE, Clerk and Stenographer. 

♦MARGARET COX, Clerk and Stenographer. 



♦ In Extension Service. 

t In Cooperation with U. S. D. A. 

t On leave of absence in army service. 



THE COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 9 9 



♦LOUISE HUDSON, Stenographer. 

t*MATTISU HAM, Audit Clerk. 

♦WILLIE SMITH, Stenographer. 

♦ILENE BRAY, Clerk. 

SUSIE DuBOSE, Stenographer. 

LOLLIE BARNETT, Stenographer. 

♦ADA PATAT, Clerk. 

♦RUBY HIGGINBOTHAM, Stenographer. 



♦ In Extension Service. 

t In Cooperation with U. S. D. A. 

t On leave of absence in army service. 



100 UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

The State College of Agriculture 



HISTORICAL STATEMENT 

The Georgia State College of Agriculture was organized in accord- 
ance with an act of the General Assembly of the State passed July 
21, 1906. It is an outgrowth of the State College of Agriculture 
and Mechanic Arts established as a department of the University of 
Georgia on May 1, 1872, by the Trustees of the University who 
accepted for the purpose, funds arising from the landscrip. From 
time to time support was received from the federal government, 
until the State, realizing that agriculture represents its principal 
industry, decided by legislative enactment to differentiate and spe- 
cifically support an agricultural college. 

The act of 1906 establishing the present College and better known 
as the "Conner Bill," contains the following preamble which sets 
forth reasons for enlarging the work of the State College of Agri- 
culture along both educational and research lines: 

"Agriculture is the principal industry of the State, and the main 
source from which the material prosperity of the State must come. 
Experience has demonstrated the great value of agricultural edu- 
cation in permanently improving the soil, multiplying its yield and 
increasing the value of its products. There is a growing demand 
by the people of the State for agricultural education, and for the 
practical benefits of scientific research in this line, and for im- 
proved methods in farming." 

This act provides that the State College of Agriculture shall be 
under the direction of a Board of Trustees, consisting of eleven 
men, three selected from the trustees of the University proper, 
three from the directors of the Georgia Experiment Station, includ- 
ing the Commissioner of Agriculture, and five from the State at 
large. The Board has the same functions and exercises the same 
authority as that of the trustees of similarly organized coordinated 
divisions of the University, but is subject, in accordance with the 
provisions of the constitution of the State, to the general control of 
the University trustees. 

The Georgia State College of Agriculture constitutes an integral 
part of the University System of Georgia, and while it has certain 
buildings, lands and equipment set aside for the special use of its 
corps of instructors and students, its work in general is closely asso- 
ciated with the University proper, so that agricultural students enjoy 
all the advantages which a great university system affords. These 
advantages include instruction and advice from the professors in 
other colleges, use of the general libraries and scientific laboratories, 



THE COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 101 

and membership in the various class and society organizations. This 
is most desirable, since classroom training is but a part of a man's 
education. 



GENERAL STATEMENT 

OBJECTS OF THE COLLEGE 

The purpose and plan of the College of Agriculture is, first to 
train agricultural students in the sciences pertaining to correct farm 
practice that they may receive a thorough and liberal education; 
second, to so arrange the course of instruction that men of limited 
means, opportunity and education may receive the greatest prac- 
tical benefit by attending courses of varying length provided by 
the College; third, to take an active part in the dissemination of 
agricultural knowledge among the farmers of the state by means 
of extension teaching, farmers' institutes, bulletins, and other pub- 
lications of a popular and practical nature, and to encourage and 
promote research in every legitimate way. 

THE AGRICULTURAL BUILDINGS. 

Agricultural Hall: The Agricultural Hall was dedicated January 
18, 1900, with appropriate ceremonies. The building is 264 feet 
long, 72 feet wide, three stories high. It is constructed of cream- 
colored pressed brick, Bedford limestone for the foundation, terra 
cotta trimmings in designs symbolical of the purposes of the build- 
ing, eaves wide and roof of red tile. The structure contains 60,000 
suare feet of floor space, has sixty large rooms comprising adminis- 
tration and division offices, private laboratories, class rooms and 
laboratories for the divisions of agronomy, animal and dairy hus- 
bandry, horticulture and entomology. The offices of the Extension 
division are also located in this building. The auditorium has a 
seating capacity of 4 00. 

Agricultural Engineering Building: This building was completed 
in 1917 and was dedicated with appropriate ceremonies. It is 75 
by 150 feet in extent and includes two stories and basement. Both 
the Division of Agricultural Engineering and the Division of Plant 
Pathology and Forestry are housed in the Engineering Building. 
Provision is made for light and heavy machinery laboratories, ma- 
terials testing laboratories, plant pathology laboratories, forestry 
laboratories, wood shop, forge shop, class room sand offices. 

Veterinary Building: The Veterinary Building, of which but one 
wing has been constructed, will be 80 by 160 feet in extent and will 
consist of two stories and basement. The present wing houses the 
serum production plant, two class rooms, the bacteriological labora- 



102 UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

tory and various offices. All buildings are finished in cream brick, 
red tile roof and otherwise conform to the general plan of the Agri- 
cultural Hall. 

Live Stock Building: A substantial beginning has been made in 
the construction of the new live stock building, and it is hoped that 
the next legislature will appropriate the necessary funds for its im- 
mediate completion. The building is 86 by 166 feet and will pro- 
vide offices, class room, and laboratory space for the entire Animal 
Husbandry Division. The main arena is 35 by 110 feet and seating 
capacity is provided around it for 2,000 people. By placing chairs 
in the show ring a total seating capacity will be provided for 3,500 
people. Since many of the conventions and gatherings at the Col- 
lege are greater than can be seated in any of the present rooms, this 
will provide a substantial increasing need for all branches of the in- 
stitution. Under the permanent seats, room has been provided for 
housing 50 animals. The pure bred live stock organizations of the 
state have long felt the need of such a show and sale building for 
holding their annual meetings, shows and sales. Ample provision 
has been made for classrooms and offices for the teaching and ex- 
tension force. 

The buildings are heated by steam, lighted by electricity, kept 
comfortable, clean and sanitary. Shower baths and lockers are 
provided for students whose laboratory work in shop or field re- 
quire these conveniences. 

CAMPUS OF COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 

The campus of the College of Agriculture is situated about half 
a mile south of the administrative building of the University of 
Georgia. The Agricultural Hall occupies a commanding position 
upon the brow of a hill, the surrounding grounds presenting unus- 
ual advantages for landscape gardening and making of a beau- 
tiful campus. Model roads and walks are being perfected, trees and 
shrubs have been planted to supplement those nature has already 
provided, and the art of landscape gardening is being applied as 
means and time will admit. 

AGRICULTURAL LIBRARY 

The library and reading room occupy large, well lighted rooms 
on the main floor of Agricultural Hall. A modern agricultural 
library has been established, consisting not only of important books 
recently issued, but a practically complete set of bulletins, apper- 
taining to agricultural subjects, of all the states and departments 
of the federal government; there are also encyclopedias, herd and 
flock books, and bound volumes of leading publications. About 200 
volumes pertaining to home economics have been added to the 
library within the past year. 



THE COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 103 

About one hundred publications including the leading agricultural 
journals of this and foreign countries, scientific and trade papers 
bearing upon agriculture, and a few popular magazines are placed in 
the reading room for the use of the students. In addition one hun- 
dred and sixty daily and weekly newspapers come to the library. 

The library is open for the use of students from 9 a. m. to 6 p. m. 
on week days, and books, not on the reserve shelves may be bor- 
rowed for a period of two weeks. 

FORESTRY MUSEUM 

The forest museum and library are located in the agricultural 
engineering building. The museum contains an excellent collection 
of tools used in woods operations, and exhibits of forest products. 
The library contains copies of the important books relating to for- 
estry and allied subjects; a complete file of government and state 
publications relating to forestry; and about fifty lumber, forestry 
and trade journals. 

LABORATORIES 

Since the success of instruction in agriculture depends largely 
upon the thoroughness and efficiency of laboratory training, the 
equipment of an institution in this respect is important. Below 
will be found a brief description of these laboratories. 

AGRONOMY LABORATORIES 

Four laboratories in the east end of the main building are used 
by the Division of Agronomy. 

The soil laboratory is located on the first floor and occupies the 
entire end of the building. This laboratory is equipped with soil 
tubes, shakers, centrifuge, water baths, ovens, distillation appara- 
tus, balances, and other apparatus necessary for carrying on the 
physical work with soils . The type soils consist of a number of 
prominent soil types. 

The farm crops laboratory is used for studying such farm crops 
as corn, wheat, oats, barley, rye, the forage crops and many miscel- 
laneous crops, such as peanuts, rice, tobacco, etc., also for the 
study of weed pests of the farm. It is equipped with laboratory 
tables, microscopes, seed germination boxes, balances, etc. Along 
the walls are seed cases in which are kept specimens of the dif- 
ferent crops as well as different market grades of grain. An her- 
barium has been started in which are mounted specimens of many 
native grasses and many of the weeds of Georgia. 

The cotton industry laboratory is equipped for cotton grading, 
identifying varieties and making a close study of the cotton plant, 
its seed and fiber. Plant breeding studies are also conducted here. 



104 UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

Characteristics of plants are noted and the results of crossing and 
selection are studied. 

Farm Management Laboratory: This laboratory has been sup- 
plied with tables and will be fitted with calculating machines as 
rapidly as possible. It is expected that more emphasis will be given 
to farm management in the future, and the equipping of this labor- 
atory is to supply the opportunity for the students to do a larger 
amount of laboratory work along this line. 

A portion of the greenhouse is set aside for laboratory work of 
this division. Soil fertility experiments and plant breeding are 
carried on by students in a part of the house. 

Private laboratories are available for instructors in preparing 
work for students and for study along special lines. 

ANIMAL HUSBANDRY LABORATORIES 

About seven thousand feet of floor space in the basement of Agri- 
cultural Hall, is set aside for laboratory work in theoretical and 
practical instruction in dairying. In the butter making laboratory 
are various makes of separators, both hand and power which the 
students are required to set up and operate, thus giving them a 
first hand knowledge of the type best suited to their farm needs. 
The laboratory has been equipped with reference both to the home 
dairy and creamery. The milk testing laboratory is a large, well 
lighted room in which several models of Babcock testers are used. 
Various methods are used for determining the adulteration of milk. 
Facilities are also provided for determining the solids not fat, as 
well as how to make curd tests. 

A pasteurizing laboratory in which students are taught how to 
meet the highest sanitary requirements as well as how to prepare 
dairy products for storage and long shipment, is provided. Refrig- 
erating facilities in which temperature requirements are met in 
ripening, storing and holding of different dairy products, are af- 
forded for laboratory work of this nature. 

Students are provided herd books and taught how to trace pedi- 
grees as well as the use of forms for tabulating and keeping them. 
Various breeds of live stock on the farm are used for stock judging, 
breeding and feeding experiments. 

HORTICULTURAL LABORATORIES 

The division of horticulture has three laboratories. A student 
laboratory and a private laboratory are in the Agricultural Hall, and 
the third, a spraying laboratory, on the horticultural grounds, sit- 
uated about 400 yards southeast of the main building. 

The students' laboratory is equipped with various models, micro- 
scopes, samples of horticultural tools, etc. The private laboratory 



THE COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 105 

contains a culture room, fume hoods, and other essential fixtures for 
research work in horticulture. Between the laboratories is the 
office with vault apartment for records. A barn, tool shed, spray and 
greenhouse constitute a part of the equipment for students' field 
work. 

Greenhouse. The College greenhouses consist of three houses 
each 75 feet long, and 25 feet wide, divided into seven compartments 
so that practical, experimental and class work can be carried on in 
them at the same time. The structures are semi-steel, the three 
being connected with a metal-lathe concrete work room. The plans 
for the development of the greenhouse plant provide that the pres- 
ent unit shall constitute only a wing of the future structure. 

AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING LABORATORIES 

The agricultural engineering laboratories, class rooms, offices and 
shops are located in the agricultural engineering building just back 
of the main agricultural building, facing the main drive. 

The basement contains the heavy farm machinery laboratory, 
the cement testing laboratory and the material testing laboratory. 
There is also a locker room with lavoratories, and the shower bath 
room. The heavy farm machinery laboratory contains tractors, ma- 
nure spreaders, threshing outfits, silage cutters and other heavy 
farm machinery. The cement testing laboratory contains all of the 
necessary apparatus used in complete testing of cements, also simple 
apparatus for speedy determinations of strength of cement. The 
material testing laboratory is also equipped with machinery for 
determining strengths of all classes of building material. 

The first floor contains the forge shop, the light farm machinery 
laboratory, the home and miscellaneous laboratory and the farm 
machinery lecture room. The forge shop is equipped with 24 latest 
Buffalo forges with a complement of tools. Adjoining are an in- 
structor's room, tool room, also storage and power room. The light 
farm machinery laboratory is equipped with latest farm machinery 
such as seeders, cultivators and light harvesting and storing ma- 
chinery. The home and miscellaneous laboratory is equipped with 
home appliances and machinery for economy and convenience. These 
include lighting, heating and water supply systems, cooking ap- 
pliances, drainage and ventilation represented by the models and in- 
stallations. 

On the second floor are located the main offices, two lecture 
rooms, the freshman drawing and surveying room, the junior draw- 
ing room and woodshop. 

The woodshop contains 52 benches with a full set of tools, a 
single surface planer, rip and cut-off saw, matcher and band saw. 
On this floor is also an instructor's room, tool and supply room and 



106 UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

freshman drawing and surveying room containing drawing tables 
for 50 students, also lockers for drawing tools and a drawing file. 
Surveying equipment sufficient to put 10 parties fully equipped in 
the field, for terracing, levelling, compass surveying and plane table 
map work is provided. The junior drawing room is equipped with 
40 drawing tables with parallel attachments, a full set of models 
of farm buildings, also models of farm gates, fencing and fencing 
materials, silos, corn cribs, tool sheds, meat curing and smoke 
house. 

AGRICULTURAL CHEMISTRY LABORATORIES 

The courses of instruction offered in this division are designed 
to prepare students for practical work. The laboratories occupy 
the west end of the top floor of Agricultural Hall, the main labora- 
tory being well ventilated and lighted from three sides. These 
laboratories are equipped with new and modern desks, hoods, tables 
for microscopic work, and apparatus for accommodating one hun- 
dred to one hundred and twenty-five students. Adjoining the main 
laboratory is a well-lighted balance room equipped with accurate 
balances. 

Adjoining the instructor's office is a private laboratory separated 
from the main laboratory by the store-room. The laboratory is 
equipped for analysis of soils, feeds, fertilizers, waters, etc. 

Each desk in the laboratory is supplied with gas, water and sinks. 
Ample facilities are offered for students to specialize in the different 
branches of analytical work, such as soils, feeds and other agricul- 
tural products. 

A laboratory has been equipped with modern apparatus for analy- 
zing soil types of the state. The chemical division is conducting a 
soil survey of the state in cooperation with the Bureau of Soils and 
all types of soil in the several counties surveyed are sent to the 
laboratory for chemical analyses. 

VETERINARY LABORATORIES 

Buildings of the veterinary division consist of a main building 
of two stories and basement, the veterinary hospital, hog house and 
other small houses. The main veterinary building contains two 
large class rooms and two large laboratories for class purposes. 
The basement is used exclusively as a laboratory for manufactur- 
ing hog cholera serum. The class room and laboratories are com- 
pletely equipped with furniture, desks, cabinets, sterilizers, micro- 
scopes, incubators, skeletons, models, charts, museum specimens 
and other articles necessary and useful in the study of veterinary 
science. 

Veterinary Hospital. The veterinary hospital is provided with 



THE COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 107 

box stalls for sick animals, bath stall, clinic room, operating room, 
dissecting room, office and dispensary, and room for attendant. A 
complete equipment of hobbles, side lines, slings, casting harness, 
dental, operating and obstetrical instruments and appliances is pro- 
vided. Clinics at which sick or injured animals are treated free of 
charge are held at stated periods during the school year. Students 
are trained in the diagnosis and treatment of diseased animals, 
required to prepare and administer medicines by various methods, 
take proper care, and maintain correct hygienic conditions. Score 
cards are used for examinations of animals for diseases, unsound- 
ness and blemishes. 

The dissecting room is used during the colder months for the 
study of anatomy and physiology, students being required to dis- 
sect and study various parts of farm animals, and observe the loca- 
tion of internal organs, the principal blood vessels, nerve and other 
structures. 

Hog cholera serum is manufactured at the hospital and affords 
frequent opportunities for autopsies of hogs, and, therefore, a study 
of contagious and parasitic diseases. 

Hog Cholera Serum. The General Assembly of Georgia made 
an appropriation in 1911 for manufacturing Dorset-Niles hog cholera 
serum. The manufacture of it continues, being carried on by the 
veterinary department of the College, that students may be better 
instructed concerning swine diseases and the manufacture and ad- 
ministration of the cholera serum. The serum is manufactured and 
supplied at cost to owners of swine through the office of the state 
veterinarian at the state capitol. The serum plant has been en- 
larged to meet the increased demand, a modern sanitary hog house 
sufficient to house 60 hogs, being added. 

PLANT PATHOLOGY LABORATORY 

Two laboratories are provided for the use of students in plant 
pathology; (1) a general laboratory for undergraduate courses and 
(2) a special research laboratory for the use of graduate students. 
The laboratories are provided with autoclaves, hot air sterilizers, in- 
cubators, microtomes, water distillation apparatus, and all the 
equipment necessary to the successful pursuance of the various 
courses. Greenhouse space is available for investigational purposes. 

FORESTRY LABORATORIES 

In conjunction with the division of agricultural engineering the 
forestry division occupies the new agricultural engineering building. 
In the basement of this building is located the timber testing lab- 
oratory, and the heavy machinery laboratory; the main floor is de- 
voted to the forest museum and laboratories, the light machinery 



108 UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

laboratory and the forge shop; the top floor to the drafting rooms, 
the class rooms and the wood shop. 

The work in the chemistry of forest byproducts is given in the 
well equipped laboratories of the division of agricultural chemistry, 
while in soils the students have advantage of the special equipment 
of the division of agronomy laboratories. Courses in botany, physics, 
economics, business administration are given in the department of 
the University having to do with those particular sciences. 

A section of the college greenhouse is devoted to investigational 
work in forestry. The greenhouse is of especial value in conduct- 
ing experiments in connection with the courses in silviculture. The 
school equipment contains the various instruments necessary for the 
carrying on of experiments in forest ecology. 

Forest Camp. The summer term of the forestry course, during 
the first two years, is conducted in Forest Camp, located in the Blue 
Ridge Mountains of north Georgia. Here the students receive their 
training in the practical aspect of forestry and become acquainted 
with the forest. During the first summer the work consists of ele- 
mentary surveying, timber estimating, tree identification and wood- 
craft. The second summer is devoted to forest mensuration, ad- 
vanced surveying and mapping and a consideration of specialized 
methods of reconnaissance. With this training it is possible for a 
student to obtain employment in his specialization during the 
junior-senior vacation. 

The camp equipment consists of tents and buildings, the tents 
being supplied with wood floors, cots and ticks. Bedding must be 
supplied by the individual student. The school equipment of field 
instruments is very good. The camp library contains works on 
woodcraft, forestry, nature study and periodicals. The students 
maintain a camp mess, board on the cooperative plan costing be- 
tween two and three dollars per week. 

POULTRY HUSBANDRY LABORATORIES 

The poultry plant is situated on the south side of the campus of 
the Agricultural College. One building contains the offices, library 
and exhibit rooms of the division. A two story building contains 
class room, incubator, cellar, egg-testing room, egg-storage room, 
attendant's room, etc. A brooder house is equipped with the Candee 
hot-water system and has a capacity of 1,200 chicks. There are five 
laying houses 24 x 14 feet and one laying house 14 x 130 feet, di- 
vided into thirteen pens. In addition there are a number of movable 
colony houses for growing the young stock on the range. The laying 
houses are equipped with hoppers, brooder coops, trap nests, etc. 
The division has a flock of 800 chickens of the principal breeds 
adapted to the state. 



THE COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 10S 

THE COLLEGE FARM 

Contiguous to the grounds of the main building and extending 
southward for more than a mile, lies the College farm, consisting of 
830 acres. The land is of varied character as to physical condition, 
types of soil and fertility. Some of it is rough and broken, a part 
fairly level, and a portion well wooded. This diviersity admits of 
tests applicable to types of soils and conditions found in many sec- 
tions of the state and is, therefore, an advantage. 

Previous to being taken over by the College, the land had been 
rented and handled in a careless manner. No crop rotation system 
had been followed, very little livestock had been kept, and as a 
result, the land was eroded in many places and was very generally 
in poor physical condition. This condition is not unlike that of a 
vast acreage in Georgia, and it has been of advantage in affording a 
basis of practical instruction in soil building by crop rotation, the 
use of legumes, growing livestock, and terracing. 

The farm has been surveyed and mapped with a view to the con- 
struction of roads, bridges, walks, and additional buildings, as funds 
become available. A survey has also been made of the soil types, 
to determine their physical characteristics. 

College Barns. As funds have become available the College has 
erected plain, but substantial barns after plans prepared by the 
division of animal husbandry and drawn by the agricultural engin- 
eering division. Their low cost and general utility have made them 
popular among farmers. The College has combined its general stock 
barn and dairy barn which heretofore have been separate pending 
the acquirement of sufficient funds to develop this more economical 
plan. The barn for dairy and general live stock consists of one large 
hay and grain barn with two small extensions, modernly euipped 
for economical feeding and sanitary housing of cattle and horses. 
The dairy portion is completely equipped for the most careful and 
scientific handling of the products of the herd. 

Two silos, one with a capacity of 150 tons and another of 200 ton 
capacity are used at the barn. 

The division of agronomy has two barns for storage and lab- 
oratory work located on the experimental plats. These are com- 
pletely equipped for the purpose. The horticultural division has a 
barn on the horticultural grounds, new and well equipped. These 
and the tool sheds, bull houses, paddocks for young stock, dipping 
vats for hogs and cattle constitute in the main, the barn facilities of 
the College. 

1,1 VE STOCK. 

Dairy Herd. Holstein and Jersey cattle are maintained in the 
College dairy herd. In 1907 a herd of grade cows was established 



110 UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

and headed by a registered bull. In 19 08 four registered Jersey 
cows were purchased and four registered Holsteins. As the heifers 
came on, the grades were replaced by full bloods so that at the pres- 
ent time there are about 25 registered animals of each breed owned 
by the College. While these animals are maintained primarily for 
student instruction and feeding experiments and demonstrations, 
they have paid a substantial profit from the time the herd was es- 
tablished. 

Beef Herd. Such a considerable portion of the College farm is so 
steep that it is better adapted to grazing than to the production of 
cultivated crops, and considerable attention is, therefore, being paid 
to beef cattle. The Shorthorn herd consists of a stock bull and 12 
cows of breeding age. They represent both the extreme beef and 
dual-purpose types. The Hereford herd consists of a herd bull and 
nine females of breeding age besides several younger heifers and 
bulls. A few grade Hereford cows are carried for experimental 
breeding purposes. 

Hog Herd. Tamworths, Berkshires and Hampshires are now 
maintained on the College farm. Plans have been perfected foi 
materially increasing the swine production work and other repre- 
sentative breeds will be added during the present year. 

Work Stock. Percheron horses of high quality are being main- 
tained on the College farm. It is believed that they are well suited 
to the farm needs throughout the state. At the present time the 
stud consists of a Percheron stallion, two registered mares, two high 
grade mares, and a stallion and two filly foals. Mules of different 
types are being used for regular farm work and in stock judging. 
A total of 26 head of horses and mules are maintained on the Col- 
lege farm. 

Horse Breeding. Aside from the registered Percheron mares and 
the pure bred stallion, and excellent grades mares as a foundation 
for breeding work on the farm, the College has been able to interest 
various communities in the state in buying Percheron mares and 
stallions. When funds are obtained, quite extensive plans will be 
put in force for assisting the farmers of the state to get better 
breeds not only of horses but also of beef and dairy cattle. 

THE DEMONSTRATION FIELD 

A field of twenty-four acres has been set aside for experimental 
work. This area of land has been subdivided into more than 1,000 
plats, ranging in size from 1-50 to 1-10 of an acre. Through the 
medium of this experimental field, nature is constantly being asked 
questions, and new facts of interest are being brought to light by 
actual field tests; the value of principles and theories developed 
through laboratory research is determined, and thus the education 



THE COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 111 

of the student is made more complete, since he not only receives 
instruction in theory in the class-room, but has the underlying 
scientific principles fully demonstrated to him in the laboratory, 
and sees the actual results which follow the application of these 
principles in farm practice. 

The demonstration field is used for the development of strains 
of cotton, corn, wheat, oats, barley, rye, and alfalfa, as well as for 
testing new varieties that will be suitable for growing under Georgia 
conditions. 

The value of crop rotations, relation of fertilizers and manures 
to crop production and the influence of different methods of cul- 
tivation revealed by the demonstration field are not only made a 
part of the knowledge of the student, but the results are sent, free 
of charge, to the farmers of the state. 

Through cooperation between this institution and the United 
States Department of Agriculture a special agent in cereal investi- 
gation is located at the State College of Agriculture to test varieties 
of cereals. A part of this work is done on the demonstration field 
of the College farm and a part is done at substations in Brooks and 
Turner counties. These results are also available to the farmers of 
the state. 

In connection with the work in Cotton Industry, special plats are 
set aside for conducting experiments in cotton breeding, both by 
selection and hybridization, and students are given opportunity to 
see the results of their own experiments. A test of all the leading 
varieties of cotton is also considered. During the growing and 
harvesting seasons, students are required to write full descriptions 
of varieties, and be able to distinguish one from another. 

A ten-^acre tract in Brooks county and a similar area in Turner 
county are used for experimental work in variety tests for south 
Georgia conditions. 

In twenty-seven other counties of the state, three-acre tracts are 
used for fertilizer demonstrations. 

ORCHARDS AND GARDENS 

About thirty-five acres of the College farm have been set aside 
for horticultural purposes. The land is rolling, and, with the excep- 
tion of one or two acres of sand, which serve well for truck crops, 
the soil is red clay. The field has been plotted and a variety 
orchard planted, in which all the varieties of apples, pears, peaches, 
plums and other fruits recommended for this section are well rep- 
resented, so that a comparative study of their qualities can be made. 
A truck garden is being developed, experimental plats laid out, and 
a commercial orchard planted. For the benefit of the fruit growers 
at large, the horticultural grounds will serve as a testing field for 



112 UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

all varieties, and also as a laboratory for experiment in and demon- 
stration of all practices of orchard and garden management for the 
benefit of the student. 

ARBORETUM AND NURSERY 

Under the direction of the Division of Forestry there is main- 
tained a ten-acre arboretum in which is to be found practically all 
of the trees and shrubs which will grow in this latitude. Among 
the specimens are many rare exotics. 

The nursery serves a double purpose: (1) as a laboratory in 
seeding, planting and propagation for the students in forestry, and 
(2) as a source from which residents of the state may obtain shade 
tree and ornamental stock at cost. In connection with the nursery 
there is maintained an experimental willow holt for the production 
of basket willow stock. Willow cuttings are furnished at cost. 



STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS 

THE AGRICULTURAL CLUB. 

The students of the College have an organization of their own, 
known as the Agricultural Club, which meets every week. The pur- 
pose of the society is to obtain drill in parliamentary practice, and 
in declamation and debate, as well as to discuss the scientific and 
practical phases of many important agricultural problems. The 
dub publishes the "Agricultural Quarterly," which is not only dis- 
tributed among the students, but is circulated over the state. This 
publication forms a desirable medium of communication between 
students and farmers, and furnishes useful literary training to 
students. 

HORTICULTURAL CLUB 

The students interested in horticulture have a club which meets 
semi-monthly for the discussion of live problems in that field of 
agriculture. 

FOREST CLUB 

The Forest Club is an organization of the students in the Forest 
School. Meetings occur regularly on Wednesday evening of each 
week. The object of the club is four-fold: (1) to keep its members 
informed on current literature; (2) to give its members opportunity 
for practice in public speaking and argumentation; (3) to bring its 
members in contact with men prominent in forestry and allied sub- 
jects provided for these men to address the club; (4) to promote 
good fellowship among the students of the Forest School. 

The club publishes an annual treating of technical and popular 
forestry, which is circulated among the leading lumbermen of the 



THE COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 113 

south, the high schools of Georgia, and the forest schools and uni- 
versities of the United States and Canada. 

AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING CLUB 

Students specializing in Agricultural Engineering have formed 
a club, the object of which is to discuss problems of importance 
along agricultural engineering lines and to promote social fellow- 
ship among the members. The club meets every second and fourth 
Wednesday night. The program consists of an address by a member 
of the faculty and two papers read by students. 

VETERINARY MEDICAL SOCIETY. 

The Veterinary Medical Society is an organization of students 
studying veterinary medicine. Meetings are held on the second 
and fourth Friday nights of each month, for the discussion of sub- 
jects of importance in the course. Special speakers are invited from 
time to time. 



FEES AND EXPENSES 

A.n education is now placed within the reach of practically every 
young man in the state of Georgia, inasmuch as he may attend the 
Georgia State College of Agriculture almost as cheaply as he may 
live at home. Unlike many other institutions, there are no tuition 
charges. 

The dormitories of the University are open to agricultural stu- 
dents. They have lately undergone considerable repairs and at 
present are very well furnished, indeed. A new student is only re- 
quired to furnish bed linen and toilet articles. 

The following is an itemized account of the expenses of a student 

for one year in College: 

Room rent, $4.00 per month $ 36.00 

Table board, $16.00 per month 144.00 

Books 15.00 

Laundry, $1.75 per month 1 5 . 7 r» 

Pressing, $1.50 per month 13.50 

♦Gymnasium and athletic fees 12.00 

Fee to literary society 2.00 

Laboratory fees, approximately 15.<mi 

Breakage fees, a part of which may be returned to student, 

approximately 10.00 

$263.25 
A young man who has had two years of military training in an 
official Junior Reserve Officers Training Corps unit is entitled to the 
commutation ration of 40 cents per day. the uniform and all neces- 
sary equipment. In this case the expenses of a student are reduced 
from $263.25 to $149.75, the commutation for subsistence amount- 






* This fee entitles the student to medical attention and entrance 
to all athletic games. 



114 UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

ing to $108.00. Where a young man remains in college for two 
years the commutation of subsistence at 40 cents per day is paid 
during the first vacation. For additional information, see page 66. 
Table board is paid monthly and room rent by the term, both in 
advance. A young man should bring at least $100 with him in New 
York exchange or money order to pay for books and meet advance 
payments for room rent, table board and laboratory fees. Checks are 
not accepted. Furnished rooms may be secured in private homes at 
from $5.00 to $10.00 for each occupant. 

SELF-HELP 

It is the purpose of the College to encourage students to work 
as much of their time as possible, for both economic and practical 
reasons. In this way the cost to the student may be reduced con- 
siderably, and his knowledge of how to apply scientific principles 
in farm practice may be materially broadened. 

Students in the College of Agriculture have the same opportuni- 
ties of securing help from the Charles McDonald Brown Scholarship 
Fund as those in other departments of the University at Athens. 
The interest on this fund is loaned to worthy young men on condi- 
tion that they obligate themselves to return it with four per cent 
interest. Application for scholarship should be made to the Chan- 
cellor of the University. A special circular of information concern- 
ing the fund and blank forms of application will be supplied on 
request. This fund makes it possible for many young men of 
limited means to secure an education. 

SCHOLARSHIPS 

The Georgia Bankers' Association has established a student loan 
fund. Eight loans to the value of $600 were made in the collegiate 
year 1917-1918, the condition imposed being that the young men 
receiving the benefits of this fund shall undertake the repayment 
of the same with interest at four per cent one year after graduation. 

The Southern Railway Company has donated the sum of $1,000 
to be known as the Southern Railway Loan Fund: William Wilson 
Finley Foundation in the Georgia State College of Agriculture. This 
fund is to be administered on the principle of the Brown fund and 
the Georgia Bankers' Association fund. Naturally, only one appoint- 
ment can be made under this foundation for the college year 1918- 
1919. The only restriction placed upon this fund is that students 
•benefiting by it live in counties traversed by the Southern Railway, 
Augusta Southern, Tallulah Falls Railway, Georgia Southern and 
Florida Railway, Macon and Birmingham Railway, or Hawkinsville 
and Florida Southern Railway. 

One scholarship valued at $250, given by H. G. Hastings & Co., 
Atlanta, Ga., to the boy making the best record in the corn club 
work for the whole state. 






THE COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 115 

Two hundred scholarships valued at $25 each to the corn club 
boys' short course to be held in August, 1919. 

One hundred scholarships valued at $25 each to the canning club 
girls' short course to be held in August, 1919. 

These short course scholarships have been given by the Georgia 
Bankers' Association, the State Fair, the Southeastern Fair, by va- 
rious railroads, boards of trade, chambers of commerce, women's 
clubs, business men, and many other patriotic citizens. 

LIST OF PRIZES, 1918-1919 

Junior Scholarship — $50 in gold given by the Virginia-Carolina 
Chemical Co. to the student showing the greatest proficiency in all 
agricultural subjects for the college year 1918-1919. 

Sophomore Scholarship — $40 in gold given by the Virginia-Caro- 
lina Chemical Co. to the student showing the greatest proficiency 
in all agricultural subjects for the college year 1918-1919. 

Freshman Scholarship — $25 in gold given by the Virginia-Caro- 
lina Chemical Co. to to the student showing the greatest proficiency 
in all agricultural subjects for the college year 1918-1919. 

One Year Course — $25 in gold given by the Virginia-Carolina 
Chemical Co. to the student showing the greatest proficiency in all 
agricultural subjects for the college year 1918-1919. 

Trustees' Prize — $25 in gold from the Board of Trustees to the 
student writing the best essay on "The Effect of the Federal Ap- 
propriation for Vocational Education on Southern Agriculture." 

$25 in gold given by The Barrett Co. to the student writing the 
best essay on "Sulphate of Ammonia as a Nitrogenous Fertilizer in 
Mixed Fertilizers, and as a Top Dressing." 

$25 in gold given by the Virginia-Carolina Chemical Co. to the 
student writing the best essay on "The Profitable Use of Fertilizer 
with Staple Crops." 

$25 in gold given by the Cotton Seed Crushers' Association of 
Georgia to the student writing the best essay on "The History of the 
Development of the Cottonseed Industry." 

$10 in gold given by H. G. Hastings & Co. to the student writ- 
ing the best essay on "The Importance of the Home Garden." 

$10 in gold given by H. G. Hastings & Co. to the student writ- 
ing the best essay on "The Influence of the Early Velvet Beans on 
Soil Fertility." 

$10 in gold given by H. G. Hastings & Co. to the student writ- 
ing the best essay on "Increasing the Yield of Small Grain by Seed 
Selection." 

$25 in gold given by the American Shorthorn Breeders' Associa- 
tion to the student writing the best essay on "The Adaptation of the 
Shorthorn to Average Farm Conditions." 



116 UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

TERMS OF ADMISSION 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN AGRICULTURE 

An applicant for the degree of B.S.A. must be sixteen years 
of age and must present on entrance 14 units, as specified below. 
No conditions are allowed, but the applicant is permitted in certain 
cases to offer two elective units in lieu of the required two units of 
foreign language, this work being taken later. The course requires 
two years of actual farm experience prior to graduation. 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN FORESTRY 

Forestry students must be sixteen years of age on entrance and 
must present 14 entrance units, as specified below. Attendance 
upon a summer forest camp is considered a part of the course. 

DOCTOR OF VETERINARY MEDICINE 

An applicant for the degree of D.V.M. must be seventeen years of 
age and must present upon entrance 14 units, as specified below. 
No farm experience is required. 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN HOME ECONOMICS 

An applicant for the B.S.H.E. degree enters the junior class. Suf- 
ficient maturity and ability to do the required work must be shown. 
Graduation from a junior college or from an institution of similar 
rank is required for entrance. An applicant must present 14 units, 
as specified below, and two years of standard college work. The two 
years of standard college work must include 6 hours of English, 3 
hours of chemistry, 3 hours of physics, 6 hours of home economics*, 
3 hours of educational psychology. 2 hours of elementary drawing 
and design, 3 hours of biology ( 1 y 2 hours of which must be phys- 
iology), and 10 hours of electives — a total of 36 credit hours. A 
student presenting 30 hours of college work may receive junior 
rating and is permitted to carry junior subjects for which she can 
offer prerequisites. 

MASTER OF SCIENCE 

An applicant for the degree of M.S. must show sufficient maturity 
and ability to do the required work. A reputable baccalaureate de- 
gree is required. 

ONE-YEAR COURSE IN AGRICULTURE 

An applicant for the one-year course in agriculture must be 
eighteen years of age and must have had some farm experience 
prior to application for entrance. The purpose of this course is to 
provide suitable instruction for those who can remain in college 
only one year. 



THE COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 117 

ONE-YEAR COURSE IX FOREST ENGINEERING 

An applicant for the one-year course must be eighteen years of 
age, and must have had experience in logging and milling operations 
prior to his application for entrance. The purpose of the course is 
to train men for the positions of timber cruiser, woods surveyor, 
logging superintendent, forest ranger, inspector, scaler, etc. 

SPECIAL STUDENTS 

Sometimes a person of mature years, not a candidate for a degree, 
but with a definite aim or for purposes of general culture, desires 
to take a course in the University without meeting the full entrance 
requirements. Such special students may be admitted under the 
following conditions: (a) they must be not less than twenty years 
of age; (b) they must give evidence of adequate preparation for 
the courses sought, to the individual professors in charge; (c) their 
names are printed separately in the catalogue. Students not less 
than eighteen years of age may be accepted as special students in 
the School of Forestry, upon the recommendation of the professor 
in charge. 

An application for admission as a special student should be ad- 
dressed to the Entrance Committee. It should state (1) the appli- 
cant's age, (2) his preparation, (3) a brief outline of the course or 
courses he wishes to pursue, (4) and the consent of the departments 
in which he wishes to register. 

Should a student admitted as a special student become a candidate 
for a degree, he will be required to satisfy the full fourteen units 
of entrance requirements. 

* ENTRANCE UNITS 

Admission to any four-year degree course requires 14 units which 
may be offered as follows: 

English 3 Foreign Language 2 

Algebra __1 Y 2 History 2 

Geometry _________ 1 Electives 4 *,_ 

Not more than \y 2 ele tive units may be selected from thefollow- 
ing: Solid Geometry, y 2 ; Agriculture, 3; Physical Geography. 1;* 
Drawing, 1; Physics, 1; Prysiology, V 2 ; Botany, 1; Zoology 1; 
Chemistry, 1; *Manual Training, 2; *Commercial subjects, (Type- 
writing, Shorthand, etc.). n ; Additional — History, Mathematics, 
English, or foreign language, each 1. 

Entrance examinations trill be held in Athens and throughout the state 
in June and September. 



* Entrance units will be ^ eepted from accredited school? o >ly. 

* Not more than three units will be allowed on freehand drawing, 
manual training and commercial subjects. 



118 UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

ENGLISH (three units) 

Three units may be offered in English. The basis for these units 
is as follows: 

Rhetoric and composition 1 unit. 

Books for careful study 1 unit. 

Books for general reading 1 unit. 

Books for careful study. One book is to be selected from each of 
the four groups. Drama: Shakespeare's Julius Caesar, Macbeth, 
Hamlet. Poetry: Milton's Allegro, II Penseroso, and either Comus 
or Lycidas; Tennyson's The Coming of Arthur, The Passing of Ar- 
thur, and The Holy Grail; selections from Wordsworth. Keats and 
Shelley. Oratory: Burke's Speech on Conciliation with America; 
Macauley's Speeches on Copyright; Lincoln's Cooper Union Speech; 
Washington's Farewell Address; Webster's Bunker Hill Oration. 
Essays: Carlyle's Essay on Burns; Selections of Burns' Poems; 
Macaulay's Life of Johnson; Emerson's Essay on Manners. 

Books for general reading. At least two books are to be selected 
under each of the five groups as follows: 

Classics in Translation. The Old Testament, comprising at least 
the chief narrative episodes in Genesis, Exodus, Joshua, Judges, 
Samuel, Kings, and Daniel, together with the books of Ruth and 
Esther. The Odyssey, with the omission, if desired, of Books I, II, 
III, IV, V, XV, XVI, XVII, Bryant's Translation. The Iliad, with the 
omission, if desired, of Books XI, XII, XIV, XV, XVII, XXI; Bry- 
ant's Translation, complete. The Aeneid. For any selection from 
this group a selection from any other group may be substituted. 

Shakespeare. Midsummer Night's Dream; Merchant of Venice; 
As You Like It; Twelfth Night; The Tempest; Romeo and Juliet; 
King John; Richard II; Richard III; Henry V; Coriolanus; Julius 
Caesar, Macbeth, Hamlet, if not chosen for study. 

Prose Fiction. Malory's Morte d'Arthur; Bunyan's Pilgrim's 
Progress, Part I; Swift's Gulliver's Travels (voyages to Lilliput and 
to Brobdingnag) ; Defoe's Robinson Crusoe, Part I; Goldsmith's 
Vicar of Wakefield; Scott: any one novel (e. g. Ivanhoe, Quentin 
Durward). Scott's Waverly Novels; Jane Austin: any one novel; 
Dickens: any one novel (e. g., A Tale of Two Cities). Thackeray: 
any one novel (e. g., Henry Esmond). George Eliot: any one novel 
(e. g., Silas Marner) ; Mrs. Gaskell's Cranford; Kingsley's Westward 
Ho! or Hereward the Wake; Reade's The Cloister and the Hearth; 
Blackmore's Lorna Dome; Hughe's Tom Brown's School Days; 
Stevenson: any of the novels; Cooper: any one novel (e. g.. The 
Spy; The Last of the Mohicans). Poe's Selected Tales; Hawthorne: 
any of the novels (e. g., The House of the Seven Gables; The Marble 
Faun). 



THE COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 119 

Essays, Biography, Etc. Addison and Steele's The Sir Roger de 
Coverley Papers, or Selections from Tatler and Spectator; Boswell's 
Selections from the Life of Johnson; Franklin's Autobiography; 
Irving's Selections from the Sketch Book, or the Life of Goldsmith; 
Southey's Life of Nelson; Lamb's Selection from the Essay of Elia; 
Lockhart's Selections from the Life of Scott; Thackeray's Lectures 
on Swift, Addison, and Steele (in English Humorists). Macaulay; 
one of the following essays: Lord Clive; Warren Hastings; Milton; 
Addison; Goldsmith; Frederic the Great; Madame d'Arblay; Trevely- 
an's Selections from Life of Macaulay; Ruskin's Sesame and Lilies, 
or Selections; Dana's Two Years Before the Mast; Lincoln: Selec- 
tions, including at least two Inaugurals, the Speeches in Independ- 
ence Hall and at Gettysburg, the Last Public Address, and Letter to 
Horace Greely. Other books of like rank may be offered. 

Poetry. Selected Poems by Dryden, Gray, Cowper, Burns, Collins. 
Selected Poems by Wordsworth, Keats, Shelley, if not chosen for 
study. Goldsmith's The Traveller, and The Deserted Village; Pope's 
The Rape of the Lock; Coleridge's The Ancient Mariner, Christabel 
and Kubla Khan; Byron's Childe Harold, Canto III; or Childe Har- 
old, Canto IV, and the Prisoner of Chillon; Scott's The Lady of the 
Lake, or Marmion; Macaulay 's The Lays of Ancient Rome; Brown- 
ing's Cavalier Tunes; Arnold's Sohrab and Rustrum, and the For- 
saken Merman; Selections from American Poetry — with special at- 
tention to Poe, Lowell, Longfellow and Whittier. Other poems of 
like rank may be offered. 

HISTORY 

Ancient History (1 unit). Special attention to Greek and Roman 
history, but including also a short introductory study of the more 
ancient nations and the chief events of the early middle ages down 
to the death of Charles the Great (814 A. D.) 

European History (1 unit). From the death of Charles the Great 
to the present time. 

English History (1 unit). 

American History and Civil Government (1 unit). The study of 
a more recent high school text in each and not a grammar school 
history. 

General History may be counted as a unit, but not in addition to 
ancient or medieval and modern history. 

MATHEMATICS 

Algebra to quadratics. 1 unit. 

Plane Geometry, 1 unit. 

Algebra, quadratics and beyond, y 2 or 1 unit. 

Solid Geometry, % unit. 

Plane Trigonometry, % unit. 



120 UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

FOREIGN LANGUAGE 

Two units in foreign language may be offered. A unit of foreign 
language is a full year's work in an accredited high school in French, 
Spanish, Latin, Greek or German. 

PHYSICS (one unit) 

The unit in Physics consists of at least 120 hours of assigned work. 
Two periods of laboratory work count as one of assigned work. 

The work consists of three closely related parts, namely, class 
work, lecture-demonstration work, and laboratory work. At least 
one-fourth of the time should be devoted to laboratory work. 

CHEMISTRY (one unit) 

The course should consist of at least three recitations and two 
hours of laboratory work weekly throughout the year. 

PHYSICAL GEOGRAPHY (one unit) 

The equivalent of work as presented in recent texts, with about 
forty laboratory lessons. 

BOTANY (one unit) 

The course should be based on one of the modern high school 
text-books. Special emphasis should be laid on the laboratory 
work which should consist of work in both the structure and physi- 
ology of plants. 

PHYSIOLOGY (one-half unit) 

Study a recent standard text-book with some laboratory work. 
A, s<tudy of muscles of chicken leg, a heart, bones, lungs, eye, brain, 
and one dissection of small animal should be made by each of two or 
four pupils. This study should come in second year of high school, 
preferably, and in connection with Botany or Zoology or in a com- 
bined text as Biology (1 unit). 

ZOOLOGY (one unit, one-half unit) 

A study of modern text and laboratory study of ten types for one 
unit, or five types for one-half unit. The study should come best in 
the second year of the high school and should consist of two class- 
room exercises and at least two laboratory double periods. 

AGRICULTURE (three units) 

To receive college entrance credit, a one year's course should con- 
sist of three recitation periods and two double laboratory periods 
per week extending through one school year. 

Where one year's work only is offered, the course in Agriculture 






THE COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 121 

is to be a general course, covering the fundamentals of soil, plans, 
animals, farm management and rural economics. 

COMMERCIAL GEOGRAPHY (one-half unit) 

One-half unit devoted to a comparative study of the industry and 
commerce of the leading nations, with emphasis on the industry and 
commerce of the United States. 

MANUAL TRAINING 

Free Hand Drawing, y 2 to 1 unit. 

Mechanical Drawing, y 2 to \y 2 units (conditioned upon an equal 
amount of Geometry with it). 

Shopwork, y 2 to 5y 2 units, approximately distributed as follows, 
and the total accepted from any student being not more than twice 
the value of the Mechanical Drawing accepted from him. Bench- 
work in Wood, y 2 unit; Cabinet Work, 1 unit; Wood Turning, y 2 
unit; Pattern Making, y 2 unit; Forging, 1 unit; Machine Work in 
Metal, 1 unit; Foundry Work, 1 unit. The time required for each 
unit is to be not less than 240 sixty-minute hours; all Shopwork, 
except Benchwork in Wood, to have periods of not less than sixty 
minutes each. 

BOOKKEEPING AND BUSINESS ARITHMETIC (one unit) 

The minimum time for one unit should be 240 hours, of sixty 
minutes. 

No credit should be allowed unless the work is done neatly, accu- 
rately, and at a satisfactory rate of speed. All work should be done 
in the class room under the eye of the instructor. Definitions of 
double entry terms, with rules for debit and credit, kinds and uses 
of books. Conduct of a set including the journal, cash' book, sales 
book; closing of books. Single entry set: changing from single to 
double entry. Text-book, with exercises so arranged that no two 
students will do exactly the same work. 

STENOGRAPHY AND TYPEWRITING (one unit) 

Shorthand. It is recommended that a minimum of one and one- 
half years be given to the study of Shorthand. Pupils completing 
the course should be able to write in shorthand prose dictated at the 
rate of 60 words a minute, and be able to translate the notes cor- 
rectly on the following day. For this one and one-half units should 
be allowed. 

Typewriting. To typewriting one year should be given. If at the 
end of the year the pupil can typewrite without error forty words a 
minute, a credit of one-half a unit should be given. 

Bookkeeping. The course in bookkeeping should be the simple 



122 UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

form in single and double entry bookkeeping, and should continue 
for one year, for which a credit of one unit should be given. 

Commercial or Business Arithmetic. The course should cover one 
year, for which a credit of not more than one unit should be given. 



THE COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 123 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN AGRICULTURE 

INTRODUCTION 

The four-year Bachelor of Science course provides for a liberal and 
thorough training along scientific lines in agronomy, soil fertility, 
animal husbandry, veterinary medicine, dairy husbandry, horticul- 
ture, forestry, agricultural engineering, cotton industry, poultry hus- 
bandry, plant pathology and agricultural education. The course is 
practical. General training in chemistry, physics, botany, biology, 
English and mathematics is also provided. Since the field of agricul- 
tural education is so broad that it is quite impossible for a student to 
pursue all the courses offered in four years, certain fundamental 
studies are prescribed, and the largest liberty of selection commen- 
surate with the best interests of the student, is permitted. In this 
way the student is enabled to select a course which is in keeping 
with his taste, and at the same time obtain sufficient special training 
to fit him for the line of work he desires to pursue after graduating. 

Outline of Course 

Freshman Sophomore 

Hrs. Hrs. 

Agronomy 1, 2 2 Animal Husb. 2, 3, 4 and 5 _ 3 

Animal Husbandry 1 _ _ _ _ 1 Botany 1__________ 3 

Agr. Eng. 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 3 Agr. Chemistry 2b 3 

Horticulture 1, 2 and 3 _ _ _ 3 History 4a, or 2a and 

Poultry Husbandry _____ 1 Economics 1 or Eco. 5 _ _ 3 

English 1 3 English 2_______ 3 

Chemistry 1________3 Physics 2 3 

Mathematics 1 and 2 3 Agronomy 5, 6 ' 3 

Military Science — 1 

20 21 

The division of the time in the junior and senior years shall be 
as follows: Hrs. 

Major _________ _12 

Minor, group 1______ 6 

Minor, group 2______ 6 

Gen. Elective 12 

36 

Total requirements for a degree, exclusive of military science, 
but including laboratories, will be 75 hours. Not more than 21 hours 
can be taken from any one department in the junior and senior 
years. Major courses may be selected from the departments of 
agronomy, animal husbandry, horticulture, agricultural chemistry, 
agricultural engineering, agricultural education, and plant pa- 
thology. 

Elective Courses. It is urged that the student give particular at- 
tention to his elective courses, selecting those courses that give the 
broadest training commensurate with special work in a department. 



124 UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

Group 1 (6 hours required) 

Agricultural Chemistry Physics 

Botany Mathematics 

Zoology 

(Note: — Bacteriology, Entomology and Plant Pathology are 

placed in Group 1 for those majoring in agricultural education). 

Group 2 (6 hours required) 

Animal Husbandry 6, 7 Entomology 

Agronomy 3 Forestry 

Veterinary Science Geology 

Agr. Engineering 6, 7, 8 9 Horticulture 10 

Bacteriology 1, 3 Poultry Husbandry 

Not later than the beginning of the junior year the student must 
submit a program written on a prescribed form for the schedule 
of work in the junior and senior years, showing his majors and 
minors, as well as his general electives. This program must be 
approved by the head of the department in which he takes his 
majoi'. 

Foreign Language. Students who do not present two units of a 
foreign language at entrance may take a foreign language in the 
freshman and sophomore years, and carry over mathematics and 
physics into the junior and senior years. 

Those desiring to study medicine may continue the study of 
French and German in the junior and senior years, and thus pre- 
pare themselves for entrance into the highest grade medical schools 
of the United States. 

Laboratory Periods. In the College of Agriculture two labora- 
tory hours count as one hour of recitation, and are included on that 
basis in the number of hours required. 

V|i AGRONOMY 

JOHN R. FAIN, Professor. 

G. A. CRABB, Junior Professor. 

L. E. RAST, Junior Professor. 

S. H. STARR, Junior Professor, Farm Management. 

P. O. VANATTER, Instructor. 
*R. R. CHILDS, Scientific Assistant. 

PAUL TABOR, Field Agent. 

E. C. WESTBROOK, Field Agent. 

FRANK WARD, Field Agent. 
•J. V. PHILLIPS, Senior Drainage Engineer. 

R. C. HARRIS, Instructor. 
*DeF. HUNGEFORD, Field Agent. 

L. V. DAVIS, Field Agent. 



In coooperation with U. S. Department of Agriculture. 



THE COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 125 

1. Cereals. The cereals studied include wheat, corn, oats, barley, 
rye and rice; sorghum, millet and buckwheat are studied briefly 
in so far as the grains are used for food. The study of these cereals 
include the origin, history, composition, cultivation and methods 
of improvement. In addition to text-book work, the cereals are 
grown in nursery rows convenient to the College, so that the student 
may study the plants first hand. The demonstration field is also 
used for the same purpose. Two hours. Second and third term. 
Freshman. Professors Fain and Rast. 

2. Cereal Judging. This is a laboratory course. The study begins 
with the seed and continues with the study of the mature plant and 
its relation to seed production. A part of this work is in the field 
and a part in the demonstration barn, so that the student is taught 
not only the various facts in regard to the development of the 
cereals, but he acquires the habit of studying these plants in the 
field. The demonstration field and cereals grown in nursery rows 
form excellent facilities for this work. The germination of corn 
is given especial attention, and the records in the demonstration 
field are used in this connection, showing the relationship between 
the germination and growth of the varieties tested. One laboratory 
period. Second and third term. Freshman. Professors Fain and 
Rast. 

3. Farm Management. Factors entering into the business of 
farming and maintaining farm lands are studied in their relations 
to each other. Special attention is paid to ways of systematizing 
the business, and methods of maintaining crop production of the 
land. In this connection a detailed study is made of rotations as 
adapted to Georgia conditions. Laying out the farm, methods of 
cropping, and records are studied. The cost of production and 
marketing is given special attention. The laboratory work will con- 
sist of conferences in which the results summarized from investiga- 
tion by the student will be discussed. The student will be required 
to use "Rural Economics," by Carver, for parallel reading. Other 
reading assignment will be made from time to time. Two lectures 
and one laboratory period. Junior. Professor Fain. 

3tf. Farm Management. A special course for senior students in 
Agricultural Education. See description under Agricultural Edu- 
cation. 

*4. Grasses and Forage Crops. The different varieties of grasses 
and forage crops are studied with reference to their yield, composi- 
tion and feeding value. Special attention is paid to those grasses 
and forage crops that are adapted to southern conditions. As silage 
is undoubtedly the cheapest form in which forage crops can be pre- 
pared in this state, considerable attention is given to the crops 
best adapted to silage, the best method of handling the crop and 



126 UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

harvesting it. This course alternates with "12" and "13." Two lec- 
tures and one laboratory. Junior. Professor Fain. 

5. Soil Physics. A study is made of the origin of soils, the differ- 
ent forms of disintegration, and the physical properties of different 
types, especially in the relation to crop production. Laboratory 
experiments are required with type soils. Each student may substi- 
tute his home soil for one of the types. This should be an average 
sample, taken from several places of the most uniform type from 
his home farm and community. In addition to the text, parallel 
reading will be assigned. Two lectures and one laboratory period. 
First half-year. Sophomore. Professor Crabb. 

6. Soil Fertility. Factors in crop production and methods of 
controlling these are studied with especial attention to the influence 
of culture and fertilizing. Methods of managing the soil, to per- 
manently increase fertility, rather than for temporary crop produc- 
tion, are emphasized. Special attention will be given to the uses 
of commercial fertilizers and general soil management. Parallel 
reading will be assigned. Two lectures and one laboratory period. 
Second half-year. Sophomore. Professor Crabb. 

*7. Soil Formations. This course will include a study of the soil 
provinces of the United States, their origin and methods of forma- 
tion, soil series and types and their relation to crop adaptation, with 
especial attention given to southern soils and conditions. Parallel 
reading will be required. Two lectures and one laboratory period. 
Prerequisite, Agronomy "5" and "6." Professor Crabb. 

la. Soil Survey. Required of students specializing in soils. Field 
work for three months in summer between junior and senior years. 
The purpose of this course is to give experience to students in the 
mapping of soils in the field and in the preparation of base maps 
and soil survey reports. Credit, three hours. 

*8. Drainage and Irrigation. The history and development of 
farm drainage and irrigation, their economic relation to crop produc- 
tion and the principles and practices of each as applied to southern 
soils. Parallel reading required. Third term. Two lectures and 
one laboratory period. Prerequisite, Courses "5" and "6." Juniors 
and seniors. Professor Crabb. 

*9. Soil Management. A study will be made of the principal soil 
types of the south and especially of Georgia, the object being to 
determine the value of plant food taken from the soil by various 
crops and to plan methods for increasing soil fertility and establish- 
ing systems of permanent agriculture. Laboratory studies will be 
made in the greenhouse by pot tests and soil solutions of the prin- 
cipal types of the state. Parallel reading required. Prerequisite, 
Agronomy "5" and "6." Two lectures and one laboratory period. 



THE COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 12 7 

This course will be given in 1919, and will alternate with Agronomy 
"10." Professor Crabb. 

*10. Fertilizers and Manures. This course will include the his- 
tory and the development and production of the various materials 
used to increase the crop growth. Source, manufacture, application 
and effect of the different materials will receive especial attention. 
Laboratory work will be carried on in the greenhouse to study the 
effect of the different fertilizing materials on plant growth. Parallel 
reading required. Prerequisite, Agronomy "5" and "6." Two lec- 
tures and one laboratory period. Juniors and seniors. This course 
will alternate with Agronomy "9," and will be given in 1920. Pro- 
fessor Crabb. 

11. Seminar. An opportunity for students to keep in touch with 
the progress in agronomy will be given in this course. Current 
periodicals and recent books will be reviewed. One two-hour period. 
Seniors. Professors Fain, Crabb and Rast. 

*12. Weeds. Weeds prevalent in the various sections of the state 
will be studied with reference to their habits of growth, crop rela- 
tionship and means of eradication. Time of growth, seed habits, and 
means of seed distribution will be given especial attention. Students 
will be required to make a collection of weeds and their seeds, and 
classify them. This course will be given only in connection with 
Agronomy "13," and will alternate with Agronomy "4." Two lec- 
tures and one laboratory period. One-half year. Senior. Professor 
Fain. 

♦13. Seeds. Seeds will be considered relative to their structure, 
production, vitality, purity, commercial grades, centers of produc- 
tion, and market variations. Two lectures and one laboratory 
period. Given only in connection with No. "12" and alternating 
with No. "4." One-half year. Senior. Professor Fain. 

*14. Farm Crops. This course is designed to give the students 
an opportunity to continue the study of cereals as well as to con- 
sider crops especially adapted to the state. Experiment station 
literature will be freely consulted. The records of the College field 
work will be given especial attention. Definite problems with one 
or more of these crops will be given the students. Two lectures 
and one laboratory period. Senior. Professor Fan). 

COTTON INDUSTRIES 

L. E. RAST, Junior Professor of Agronomy, in Charge 
of Cotton Industries. 
1. Special students who wish to take work in cotton industry 
will be given an opportunity to become familiar with the literature 
of cotton. The instructor will meet with such students once a week 
for conference and direction. Experiment station work in this 
country will receive especial attention. Professor Rast. 



128 UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

2. Field Work for Special Students. Field work conducted by 
this department gives students opportunity to get first hand in- 
formation from the experiments under way. The records of the field 
for some years are also available. Professor Rast. 

3. Production of Cotton and Other Fiber Crops. Varieties, meth- 
ods of selection, planting, culture, harvesting, and marketing of the 
cotton crop will be considered in detail. As a matter of comparison 
with the cotton crop, other fiber crops will be considered. The lab- 
oratory work consists of combing, mounting, testing fibres, and 
grading, as well as a considerable amount of field work. Junior or 
senior. Two lectures and one laboratory. Professor Rast. 

4. Plant Breeding. A general course in the principles of breed- 
ing. While especial reference is made to the technique in cotton 
breeding the breeding of other farm crops for improvement is also 
given important consideration. This course also includes the prin- 
ciples of breeding farm animals to meet the needs of students in 
animal husbandry. Text: "Principles of Breeding," Davenport. 
Supplemented by references. First half-year. Two lectures, one 
laboratory. Junior and senior. Professor Rast. 

5. Plant Breeding. An extension of the above course which is 
prerequisite. A study of the methods used by the best plant and 
animal breeders will constitute the greater portion of this course. 
A certain amount of practice both in field and greenhouse is re- 
quired of each student. Two lectures and one laboratory period. 
Second half-year. Junior and senior. Professor Rast. 

*6. Agricultural Colleges and Experiment Stations. This course 
will include the history and development of the land-grant colleges 
and experiment stations in the United States and their relation to 
the advancement of agriculture, also a review of the development 
along similar lines in other countries. Especial attention is given to 
present methods in experiment station work. Three hours. One- 
half year. Seniors. Professor Rast. 

7. Research. Cotton Industry "4" and "5" are prerequisite for 
this course. Further consideration is given to plant breeding in 
which opportunity is offered for the study of cytology of cotton and 
the cytological aspect of cotton breeding. Text, Punnett's "Mendel- 
ism." One lecture and two laboratory periods. First half-year. 
Seniors. Professor Rast. 

8. Biometry. Students have special wok in correlating charac- 
ters of the cotton plant. The various lines of breeding carried on 
at the College afford an opportunity for a study of statistical meth- 
ods. One lecture, two laboratory periods. Second half-year. Pro- 
fessor Rast. 

9 and 10. .Cotton Industry. Cotton grading, warehousing and 



THE COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 129 

marketing. Experimental cotton breeding. Three-hour credit. Fee, 
$5. Professor Rast. 

Note: The following courses (indicated by *) will not be given 
unless as many as five students are registered for them: Agronomy 
"4," "7," "8," "9," "10," "11," "12," "13," 14;" Cotton Indus- 
try "6." 

ANIMAL HUSBANDRY 

MILTON P. JARNAGIN, Professor. 

T. G. YAXIS, Junior Professor. 

R. M. GRIDLEY, Field Agent. 

W. H. HOWELL, Assistant in Dairying. 

JAMES E. DOWNING, Pig Clubs. 

C. A. MARTINI, Field Agent. 

H. B. EMERSON, Field Agent, Beef Cattle. 

L. H. MARLATT, Scientific Assistant. 

W. R. NISBET, Specialist, Beef Cattle. 

CHAS. E. KELLOGG, Specialist, Beef Cattle. 

J. W. CLARKE, Specialist, Sheep. 

CARL WALLACE, Specialist, Swine. 

1. Types and Market Classes of Live Stock. Various types and 
grades of live stock are considered from the standpoint of adapta- 
tion to local conditions and market demands. It includes a con- 
sideration of the value of beef type in beef making, the American 
market classification, stock classes and grades of cattle and breed- 
ing for the market. The dairy type is considered with reference to 
function of milk secretion, variation in the usefulness of dairy cows, 
breeding for milk production and for dual-purposes. 

The lard and bacon type of hogs are studied, also the market 
demands. The mutton type, sheep markets and breeding for mar- 
ket demands are given consideration. Important factors in horse 
production and the market demands for various classes are studied. 
Two one-hour recitations and one two-hour laboratory period. First 
term. Freshman. Professor Jarnagin. 

la. Special course for junior forestry course. 

2. Horses, Mules and Beef Cattle. In this couFse the origin, 
history and development of the various breeds of horses and beef 
cattle are studied. The adaptation of the various breeds and types 
to different conditions of soil, climate and environment is considered. 
A comparison of draft and light horses is made, and especial em- 
phasis is laid on the adaptation of the different types of horses and 
mules to various kinds of work. Two one-hour recitations each 
week. First term. Sophomore year. Professor Jarnagin. 

3. Dairy Cattle. In this course the origin and utility of the 
several breeds of dairy and dual-purpose cattle are studied. Their 



130 UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

adaptation to the production of milk, butter, cheese, or to both 
milk and beef making are carefully considered. A comparison of 
the profits derived from the various breeds under different condi- 
tions of farming forms an important part of the instruction provided. 
Two one-hour recitations each week. Second term. Sophomore 
year. Professor Jarnagin. 

4. Sheep and Swine. This course embraces a study of the history 
and development of the various breeds of lard and bacon hogs, both 
of English and American origin. Especial attention is given in this 
course to types of hogs suited to grazing. The history of the various 
breeds of sheep is taken up, and comparison of the several classes 
made. Special emphasis is laid on growing and marketing lambs 
and on classifying wool. Two one-hour recitations. Third term. 
Sophomore year. Professor Jarnagin. 

5. Stock Judging. The students receive training in the use of 
the score card for various classes of live stock, and study the stand- 
ards of excellence as established by the several breed associations. 
In addition to this, they are given practical work in comparative 
judging and show-ring placing of various breeding and market 
classes of horses, dairy and beef cattle, bacon and lard hogs and 
fine, medium and long wool sheep. Two two-hour laboratory periods 
each week. First, second and third term. Sophomore year. Pro- 
fessor Jarnagin. 

6. Live Stock Production. This course is designed for students 
specializing in animal husbandry and deals especially with the pro- 
duction of hogs, beef cattle and horses, and includes a considera- 
tion of the adaptation of the beef breeds and specific needs. The 
principles of breeding, feeding and general management are studied. 
The laboratory work will consist of advanced live stock judging and 
preparation for the show or sale ring. Practical work will be given 
in laying out the necessary yards, paddocks and housing facilities for 
the various classes of live stock. Prerequisite, A. H. 2, 3, 4, and 5. 
Two one-hour recitations and one laboratory period. Junior year. 
Professor Taxis. 

7. Principles of Dairying. This course includes the theoretical 
and applied side of dairy and creamery practice. A detailed study 
is made of the theory of milk secretion, formation and production; 
separation of cream by the shallow and deep setting systems, and 
by the use of centrifugal machines; the natural fermentations oc- 
curring in milk, their benefit and control; the manufacturing of 
butter; the testing of milk and its products of butter fat. Prere- 
quisite, A. H. 2, 3, 4, and 5. One lecture and two laboratory periods 
per week. Fall term. Professor Yaris. 

8. Principles of Breeding. The principles of breeding include a 
consideration of selection, heredity, atavism, normal variation and 



THE COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 131 

fecundity. The methods of breeding studied include in-breeding, 
line-breeding, cross-breeding, and a review of the methods by which 
the best types of animals have been developed. Three one-hour reci- 
tations. Senior year. Professor Jarnagin. 

8a. Principles of Breeding. This course is designed for sopho- 
more veterinary medicine students. It deals with heredity, selection, 
atavism, variation and cross-breeding. A study of the pedigrees of 
phenomenal animals and methods and principles followed by the 
best breeders are studied. Three recitations per week, first term. 
Sophomore year. Professor Jarnagin. 

9. Animal Nutrition. In this course a study of the gross anatomy 
and physiology of the digestive system is included. The theoretical 
and practical side of compounding balanced rations for maintenance, 
milk and butter production, fattening and growth are fully ex- 
plained. Three recitations per week. Senior year. Professor Jar- 
nagin. 

9a. Animal Nutrition. This course is designed for sophomore 
students in veterinary medicine. It deals specifically with feeding 
problems and the underlying principles of animal nutrition, together 
with a detailed study of results obtained by experimental feeding 
in the different experiment stations. Second and third terms. Three 
recitations per week. 

10. Advanced Work in Animal Nutrition. This course is pro- 
vided for advanced students in animal husbandry. The results of 
feeding tests at the various experiment stations and agricultural 
colleges in this and other countries are reviewed. Three one-hour 
recitations per week. First term. Senior year. Professors Jarnagin 
and 7 axis. 

11. Feeding Problems. Qualified students are allowed to assist 
in conducting feeding tests, keeping records and summarizing results 
of experimental feeding conducted by the division of animal hus- 
bandry. They will also be expected to make analyses of the various 
feeding stuffs used and to determine the fertilizing value of the 
excreta obtained from various classes of farm animals. Three one- 
hour recitations per week. Second term. Professors Jarnagin and 
Taxis. 

12. Economics of Animal Production. In this course the various 
types and breeds of livestock are considered in their relation to 
the utilization of various farm crops, the productiveness of the soil 
and the creation of wealth in general. Three one-hour recitations 
per week. Third term. Professors Jarnagin and Taxis. 

13. Research Work in Animal Husbandry. Qualified students are 
allowed to carry on investigations in animal husbandry under the 
approval and direction of the professor in charge of the depart- 
ment. Three hours. Senior. Professors Jarnagin and Yaxis. 



132 UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

14. Dairy Manufacturing. This course is a continuation of "7" 
and deals specifically with, creamery problems. It includes butter 
making with power machinery, ice cream manufacturing, butter 
judging, creamery machinery and creamery management. Two 
laboratories and one recitation. Second and third term. Junior. 
Professors Jarnagin and Taxis. 

15. Milk Production and Dairy and Farm Management. This 
course includes advanced judging of dairy cattle, the breeding, feed- 
ing and management of dairy cattle and marketing of dairy products. 
Two recitations and one laboratory throughout the senior year. 
Professors Jarnagin and Taxis. 

16. Animal Husbandry. This course is designed especially for 
students in home economics and will include production and handling 
of milk, and its products, in the home. Farm butter making and the 
making of various kinds of soft cheeses will be taken up. Consid- 
erable attention will be given to the testing of milk and its products 
and food value of the same. One lecture and two laboratory periods, 
second half of year. One and one-half hours credit. Fee, $2.50. 
Professor Taxis. 

17. Feeds and Feeding. (Smith-Hughes Vocational Students). 
The underlying principles of feeds and feeding will be studied with 
particular emphasis on the practical problems of feeding farm ani- 
mals. The students will be required to carry out feeding demonstra- 
tions with animals on the College farm, and keep accurate records 
of kinds and amounts of feeds used, and their effects on the ani- 
mals. Two recitations per week and the necessary time in the barn 
for carrying out the feeding problems and completing records. Credit 
will be given for one laboratory period each week. Professor Jarnagin. 

AGRICULTURAL CHEMISTRY 

W. A. WORSHAM, Jr., Professor. 

L. M. CARTER, Junior Professor^grf Soil Chemistry. 

D. D. LONG, Junior Professor in Charge Soil Survey. 

M. W. LOWRY, Adjunct Professor of Soil Chemistry. 

W. O. COLLINS, Instructor. 

C. N. WILDER, Instructor. 

1. Organic Chemistry. This course consists of the study of the 
classification and relation of the carbon compounds, and the prepara- 
tion of the simpler and more important ones. 

Stress will be laid on those compounds relating more directly to 
agriculture, -such as carbohydrates, proteins and fats. 

The physiological chemistry of plants and animals will be studied 
dealing mainly with the general subjects of food and nutrition as 
applied to both animals and plants and photosynthesis in plants. 



THE COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 133 

The animal fluids, milk, blood and urine will be studied in detail. 

Students taking this course must have had Inorganic 1 or 2 in- 
cluding work in laboratory. 

Organic Agricultural Chemistry by Chamberlain will be used as 
a text. 

Two hours of lectures and recitations, and one laboratory period 
for three terms. 

Optional for juniors and seniors. Required of Forestry and Vet- 
erinary students during sophomore year. Fee, $5. Professor Wor- 
sham. 

2b. Qualitative Analysis. In this course a study is made of the 
characteristic properties and reactions of the common metals and 
acid radicals. The principles involved in the separation of the 
groups and the individual metals of the respective groups are stud- 
ied in the laboratory. By systematic work with known substances 
and then with unknown substances the student will be able to famil- 
iarize himself with processes employed in qualitative analysis. The 
course is planned to enable the student to determiile the composition 
of ordinary substances especially those that are of most importance 
in agriculture. One lecture and two laboratory periods during the 
sophomore year. Fee, $5. Professor Worsham. 

3. Quantitative Analysis. The object of this course is to prepare 
the student for special work in agricultural chemistry as well as to 
teach the method of quantitative analysis. 

The methods of both gravimetric and volumetric analysis will be 
treated in lectures and the practice carried out in the laboratory. 
Substances of known percentage composition will first be analyzed 
and then substances of unknown composition, including the simpler 
agricultural products. Texts: "Elementary Quantitative Chemical 
Analysis," Lincoln and Walton. Reference books, "Quantitative 
Analysis," by Treadwell, Olsen and Frasenius. Two lectures and 
recitations and seven laboratory periods for three terms. 

3b. Same as Course "3," except that students not specializing in 
chemistry, have one hour of lectures and recitations and two lab- 
oratory periods. Optional for juniors and seniors. Fee, $5. Pro- 
fessor Worsham. 

4. Advanced Quantitative Analysis. The basis of the work in this 
course will be the study of the methods employed in soil investiga- 
tions, the analysis of soils, fertilizers, feeds, water, etc. Some lat- 
itude is allowed the student as to the substances to be analyzed. 
Students taking this course must have had Agricultural Chemistry 
"3." Work for laboratory will be outlined and standard references 
given. 

Two hours of lectures and recitations and seven laboratory periods 
for three terms during senior year. 



134 UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

4b. Same as Course "4," except that students not specializing in 
chemistry have one hour of lectures and recitations and two lab- 
oratory periods. Optional for seniors. Fee, $5. Professor Worsham. 

5. Chemistry of Forest Byproducts. This course consists of the 
detailed study of the chemical byproducts of the forest, destructive 
and steam distillation, the mechanical and chemical processes of 
paper manufacture from wood, the production of turpentine and 
rosin, the production of wood alcohol, acetic acid, creosote, and 
the possibility of further utilization of sawmill waste. Three credits. 
Required of forestry students. Fee, $5. Professor Worsham. 

A deposit of $5 will be required for each laboratory course to 
cover breakage of apparatus and chemicals used. If any of this 
amount is left it will be returned to the student at the end of the 
year. 

11. Chemistry of Foods. This course treats of the chemical com- 
position, digestibility, and nutritive value of the more common 
classes of foods. Special attention is given to those products pro- 
duced in the state^of Georgia. Consideration is given to the common 
forms of adulteration and methods of detecting the presence of 
substances used in adulterants. The course includes the analysis 
of milk and butter and approximate analysis of some cereal food 
product. Required of juniors taking Home Economics. One and 
one-half hours, second half-year. Fee, $2.50. Professor Worsham. 



THE COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 135 

AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION 

J. T. WHEELER, Professor. 

C. J. HEATWOLE, Professor. 

L. M. SHEFFER, Junior Professor. 

1. Introduction to Vocational Education. This course treats of 
educational and sociological values; some means of measuring edu- 
cational values; educational needs of the several groups of society, 
the school and other agencies for meeting these needs, vocational 
training under school conditions; relations of these topics to agricul- 
tural teaching and to rural life will be emphasized; development of 
agricultural education in the United States, agencies, activities, or- 
ganization and administration of United States Department of Agri- 
culture, the Agricultural College, and secondary schools and de- 
partments of agriculture. Juniors and seniors with requisite farm 
experience. Three hours the year. Professor Wheeler. 

la. Educational Psychology. This course is a study of mental 
processes with their application to education and teaching. The fol- 
lowing topics will he treated: The nature and meaning of conscious- 
ness and its relation to conduct. The main facts relating to the 
structure of the nervous system so as to determine the relation of 
the body and mind. The characteristics of the learning process, 
such as original nature, capacities, instinctive tendencies, habit, at- 
tention, memory, imagination, thinking and feeling; transfer of 
training. The peculiar characteristics of the adolescent life. Indi- 
vidual differences, mental tests and scientific measurements. The 
course will seek to acquaint the student with the elementary facts 
of mental life that his teaching may be scientific and consistent with 
the laws of the economy of learning. Juniors. Three hours, half 
year. Professor Heatwole. 

2. Methods and Materials in Vocational Agriculture. Topics con- 
sidered: purpose of secondary vocational agriculture; the organiza- 
tion of the high school for teaching vocational agriculture, the cur- 
riculum, course of study, text-books, equipment, the project, exten- 
sion activities, organization of subject matter, planning and pre- 
sentation of laboratory and class exercises, preparation of illus- 
trative materials; observational work. Seniors or juniors with 
requisite farm experience. One lecture and two laboratories through 
tho year. Professors Wheeler and Shcffer. 

2a. Principles of Teaching. The application of the principles of 
education to the practice of teaching: the function of the teacher in 
the learning process; function of subject matter; the problem as a 
factor in the teaching process; attention, basis and utilization of 
interest; concrete basis for teaching; methods, lecture, text-book, 



136 UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

development, recitation, art of questioning, arguments; tests of 
methods, testing results. Juniors. Three hours, half-year. Pro- 
fessor Heatwole. 

3. Project Practice. Arrangements can be made for a limited 
number of students to take production projects in cooperation with 
the various college divisions. While this work will be carried on 
only during the last half-year, students desiring this work must 
arrange for it before the Christmas recess. Juniors elective, equiv- 
alent three hours second half-year. Professor Sheffer. 

4. Practice Teaching. Arrangements will be made for a limited 
number of students to do practice teaching in agriculture in nearby 
high schools under the direction of the Division of Agricultural Edu- 
cation. Senior elective credits, one to three, time to be arranged. 
Professor Sheffer. 

5. Rural Laws and Standards. This course deals with the fed- 
eral rules and regulations effecting the production, destruction, 
standardization and marketing of farm commodities; state and fed- 
eral farm titles and boundaries; labor laws; water, irrigation and 
power laws; livestock and dog laws; common carrier duties, rights 
and immunities; cooperative enterprises; texts and readings. Three 
hours per week, half-year. (Not offered in 1919-20). 

5a. Rural Social Problems. Applications of sociological principles 
to problems of country life. Redirected rural life and education. 
Needs of country school, church, home, health, sanitation, recreation, 
community gatherings, etc. Drift to cities. Negro migration. 
Diagnoses, remedies, investigations. Three hours, half-year. Pro- 
fessor . 

6. Research Problems. This course considers further the prob- 
lems arising in connection with Courses 1 and 2. Special readings 
problems will be assigned for investigation and thesis required. 
Seniors, two hours through the year. Professors Wheeler and Sheffer. 

7. Rural Economics. Application of economics to country life; 
significance to the nation; rural vs. urban population; occupations; 
shifting of population; farm ownership and tenantry; rural in- 
comes and wealth; special economic activities; organization and 
cooperation; marketing and buying; transportation; rural fina- -e; 
surveys of rural wealth, its production, distribution and consu ap- 
tion. Three hours, half-year. Professor . 

8. Rural Journalism. A course planned for students of Vocat' al 
Agriculture and required of those taking senior work. The co ~e 
includes a study of rural publicity, report writing, press wori on 
projects, and special work in the compilation and arrangemc: of 
statistical data. Three hours a week. Mr. Maddur. 



THE COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 137 

(Note: See University catalog for other courses in Journalism). 

Supervised Teaching 

The Georgia State Vocational Board requires that all graduates 
of the Division of Agricultural Education who enter the field "of 
agricultural teaching shall be under the supervision of the Division 
for one year after entering upon their work. This requirement 
makes it possible for the graduates of this Division to get valuable 
aid in establishing themselves in the professional work. 

(Note. For graduate credit, see Graduate and Summer School 
Catalog). 

AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING 

LEROY C. HART, Professor. 
E. G. WELCH, Junior Professor. 
*W. E. BROACH, Field Agent. 
S. R. KIRK, Foreman. 

1. Shop Work (a). Wood Work. This course is designed for the 
instruction of the student in the use, care and sharpening of all 
wood-working tools. A carefully planned series of exercises are 
offered. These exercises bring into use all tools that will be help- 
ful to the student in after life. An advanced course in woodwork 
planned for students having had the preliminary work, will be given. 
This course will consist of the design and building of furniture and 
other articles for the home. (b) Forge Work. This work is de- 
signed to familiarize the student with the building and care of coal 
fires, the manufacture of iron and steel, and to familiarize him 
with the working and handling of iron and steel. Tool-making and 
tempering will be given. Required of freshmen. One hour credit. 
Professor Welch and Mr. Kirk. 

2. Drawing. Sufficient time will be devoted to free-hand drawing 
to enable the student to execute readily the necessary drawings in 
the various laboratory courses. Instrumental drawing will then be 
taken up so that the student may become familiar with the use of 
the instruments and be able to execute rapidly and neatly any draw- 
ing of this kind that will be required. Freshman year.| Professor 
Welch. 

2a. Forest Drawing. Special drill in drawing topographical maps, 
using all topographical signs employed in topographic survey. This 
course is for forestry students, but may be elected by advanced 
students. Prerequisite, Agricultural Engineering "2." Professor 
Hart. 

3. Farm Machinery Judging. A study will be made of the con- 
struction and use of the various farm machines, such as are used 



138 UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

for preparing, planting, cultivating, harvesting, storing and for home 
and miscellaneous machinery. Each group will be taken up sep- 
arately, studied and judged. Required of freshmen. Professor 
Welch. 

4. Farm Motors. Considerable time will be given to study and 
operation of the gasoline engine, the steam engine and the electric 
motor. This course is taken up in connection with Agricultural 
Engineering "3." Required of freshmen. Professor Hart. 

5. Farm Surveying. This work will consist of the study and 
the use of farm levels and compass, and plane table, or terracing, 
leveling and the survey of farm lands, and also their use in road 
building. Each student will be required to make a thorough map of 
a plot of ground and compute its area. Course "2" prerequisite. 
Required of freshmen. Professor Welch. 

(Note: Courses 2 and 5, 1 hour credit. Courses 3 and 4, 1 hour 
credit). 

5a. Forest Surveying. An advanced course is offered in the use 
of the compass, level, plane table and transit, with special attention 
to the different uses of these instruments in topographic and recon- 
noissance work. The work will consist of a hasty survey of a plot 
of ground. Then a more careful survey will be made as a check 
upon the first to illustrate the difference in accuracy. This will 
enable the student to determine the method to be used on all future 
work. Work required in the sophomore year for all forest students, 
but may be elected by other students who have had Agricultural 
Engineering "2a" and "5," or their equivalent. Two hours credit. 
Professor Hart. 

5b. Saw Mill Machinery and Construction. Thi scourse takes up 
the study of saw mill and machinery, and deals with the framing of 
saw mill buildings and other structures using built-up members. 
Forest students. Sophomore. Prerequisite, Agricultural Engineer- 
ing "2." Two hours credit. Professor Hart. 

6. Fencing. This will include a study of the strength and adapt- 
ability of various materials for fence construction. The principles 
of gate construction, and bracing at the corners and at sufficient 
points according to the condition of the ground. Junior. Professor 
Hart. 

7. Farm Buildings. This course consists of the study and design 
of farm buildings, starting with the simple and gradually working 
up to the most complicated. Plans are drawn and from these, the 
bill of material and an estimate of the cost of the completed struc- 
ture are made. Attention is given to farm conveniences and sanita- 
tion. Considerable time will be spent in studying problems of light- 
ing, heating, water supply and sewerage disposal for the farm home. 
Agricultural Engineering "2," or its equivalent, are prerequisite 



THE COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 139 

to this course. Juniors. Fall and winter term. One lecture and 
two laboratory periods. Professor Hart. 

7a. Wood Physics. A study of the strength of wood under dif- 
ferent conditions and shapes, also the physical effect of moisture, 
heat and preservatives upon its strength is taken up. Required of 
forest students. Second term, junior. One hour credit. Professor 
Hart. 

7c. Wood Preservation. The primary cause of decay; factors 
governing the lasting powers of different species; the preservation 
of woods by the application of paints and oils to the surface; the 
impregnation with creosote and other wood preservatives; the com- 
mercial method of impregnation; description of preserving plants 
and the fire proofing of timber. Junior. One hour credit. Pro- 
fessor Hart. 

8. Concrete Construction. A study will be made of the principles 
of concrete construction, also the material, forms, mixing, placing 
and tamping. Their application to farm and forest conditions and 
the various uses to which concrete has been put in late years are 
pointed out. Special attention is given to its use for residences, 
barns and its application in forestry. The construction of fence 
posts from concrete is taken up. Optional for seniors. Agricultural 
Engineering "2," "6," and "7" prerequisite, or their equivalent. 
Professor Hart. 

8a. Concrete Testing. An advanced course in the testing of 
cements and concretes under different conditions, shapes, aggregates 
and reinforcing is given. One lecture and two laboratory periods. 
Three hours credit. Professor Hart. 

9. Road Building. Practice work is given in locating roads at 
the most desirable grades with special attention to drainage. Con- 
siderable time will be devoted to road materials, and making tests 

of the various kinds. Optional for seniors. Agricultural Engineer- 
ing "5" prerequisite to this course. Professor Hart. 

(Note: Courses "8" and "9" will constitute half a year's work. 
One and one-half hours credit). 

10. Farm Buildings. An advanced course in the design, location 
and construction of all farm buildings. The stress in different 
members of a design are carefully figured. Models are built and 
tested to verify the results obtained. Government bulletins and 
parallel reading "Farm Buildings," Sanders Publishing Co. One 
lecture and two laboratory periods a week throughout the year. 
Three hours credit. 

11. Farm Machinery. An advanced course in the elements of 
machinery. The measurement and transmission of power. The 
development, use, construction and repair of all farm machinery. 



140 UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

Text, Farm Machinery and Farm Motors," parallel reading, pre- 
requisite, Farm Machinery "3." Professor Welch. 

12. Farm Motors. The sources of power for agricultural pur- 
poses. Tread and sweep powers. Steam, gasoline, air and oil en- 
gines and tractors, windmills and electric motors, as far as appli- 
cable to agricultural purposes. Texts, "Power and the Plow," 
"Gasoline Engine on the Farm." Parallel reading. Prerequisite, 
Agricultural Engineering "4," "11" and "12" constitute a year's 
work. One lecture and two laboratory periods throughout the year. 
Three hours credit. Professor Welch. 

14. Farm Sanitation. An advanced course in the lighting, heat- 
ing, ventilating, plumbing and drainage of farm buildings, also in 
methods employed for sewage disposals. Text, "Rural Hygiene," 
by Ogden; "Practical Methods of Sewage Disposal," Ogden and 
Cleveland; "Dommestic Water Supplies for the Farm," Fuller. 
Parallel readings, Government bulletins. Prerequisite, Agricul- 
tural Engineering "7." One lecture and two laboratory periods 
half the year. One and one-half hours credit. Perofssor Hart. 

15. Drainage and Irrigation Engineering. Drainage of farm 
lands, both by the open ditch and tile drainage. Methods used in 
making the preliminary surveys and estimates. The finished survey 
and report. Drainage laws and assessments. Irrigation methods 
in use. The application and measurement of water. Texts, "Irri- 
gation and Drainage," King; "Practical Farm Drainage," and 
"Engineering for Land Drainage," by Elliot. Government bulletins 
and parallel reading. Prerequisite, Agricultural Engineering "5." 
One lecture and two laboratory periods half year. One and one- 
half hours credit. Professor Hart. 

16. Road Building. A continuation of Agricultural Engineer- 
ing "9." The economic value of good roads is taken up in connec- 
tion with a more detailed study of the problen. The location, drain- 
age, road material, construction and road machinery are studied. 
Highway bridges and culverts are taken up. Text, "American High- 
ways," Shaler. Government bulletins and parallel reading. Pre- 
requisite, Agricultural Engineering "5," and "9." One lecture and 
two laboratory periods half the year. One and one-half hours 
credit. Professor Hart. 

17. Agricultural Surveying. An advanced course in use of the 
usual surveyin"; instruments, with especial attention to detail and 
accuracy. Text, Pence and Ketchum's "Surveying Manual," and 
"Land Surveying," Hodgman. Prerequisite, Agricultural Engineer- 
ing "5." One lecture and two laboratory periods throughout the 
year. Three hours credit. Professor Hart. 

18. Home Designing. This course is offered for the students who 
specialize in Home Economics, and takes up the designing of homes. 



THE COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 141 

Some of the topics considered are: location with reference to sani- 
tary, convenient, and attractive surroundings; planning for com- 
fort, convenience, and beauty at reasonable cost. Junior, winter 
term. Three laboratory periods. Credit, one hour. Professor Hart. 
19. Home Equipment. This course is supplemental to No. 18, 
and takes up home conveniences, water supply, sewerage disposal, 
lighting, heating and ventilation. Winter term. One hour credit. 
Senior. Professor Hart. 

FORESTRY 

JAMES B. BERRY, Professor. 
LOUIS A. ZIMM, Extension Forester. 
E. W. HADLEY, Student Assistant. 

3. Farm Forestry. Forestry as an adjunct to agriculture. Forest 
influences, nursery practice, field planting, thinnings and improve- 
ment cuttings, protection, estimating timber, wood measurements, 
seasoning and preservative treatment of wood, financial results. 

Text, lecture, collateral reading. One laboratory period, three 
hours, second semester. Fee, $1. 

4a. Tree and Shrub Identification. Systematic study of the local 
flora; winter and summer characteristics; collection and preparation 
of material for class use; practical field identification; text and col- 
lateral reading; preparation of note book and herbarium; three lab- 
oratory periods per week, first half year or Summer School. Fee, 
$2.50. 

15a. Wood Identification and Uses. Structure and properties of 
wood; generic characteristics; practical means of identification; ef- 
fect of stains and oil; adaptability to specific needs; the subject is 
considered from the standpoint of home furnishing; text and col- 
lateral reading; reports. Three laboratory periods, second half-year. 
Fee, $1. 

For courses leading to Bachelor of Science in Forestry, see page 68. 

HORTICULTURE 

T. H. McHATTON, Professor. 

R. E. BLACKBURN, Adjunct Professor. 

H. W. HARVEY, Adjunct Professor. 

W. A. SMITH, Field Agent. 

S. E. McCLENDON, Field Agent. 

C. B. SWEET, Foreman. 

1. Elements of Horticulture: Fruit Growing. A general study 
of location, site, frost, planting, varieties, orchard tillage and man- 
agement. Three lectures per week. Required of freshmen in fall 
term. 



14 2 UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

2. Pruning and Propagation. A course in grafting, budding and 
other methods of propagation; also a study of pruning with its 
practice and effect. A few periods are devoted to a study of varieties 
both for orchard and truck garden. Laboratory course of three 
periods per week. Parallel reading, "Pruning Book," by Bailey; 
and "Plant Propagation." by Kain. Required of freshmen in winter 
term. 

3. Elements of Horticulture: Truck Gardening. A general study 
of the main truck crops as to planting, tillage and handling, with 
the addition of a study of hotbeds and their management. Three 
laboratory periods per week. Parallel reading, "Garden Farming," 
by Corbett. Required of freshmen in spring term. 

4. Small Fruits. A study of the various small fruits of interest 
to the horticulturist. Three lectures a week for six weeks. Text, 
"Bush-Fruits," by Card. Fruit Harvesting, Storing and Marketing. 
Three lectures a week for six weeks. Book, "Fruit Harvesting, 
Storing and Marketing," by Waugh. First term. Juniors and 
seniors. 

5. Pomology and Garden Seeds. A course in the testing of seeds 
and a study of the several species of fruit with their pomological 
classification. Text, "Systematic Pomology," Waugh; supplemented 
by lectures. A laboratory course of three periods per week, to be 
carried with Course "4." Fall term. Junior or senior. 

6. Greenhouse Management and Floriculture. A study of the 
various flower crops, forcing crops and management of a greenhouse. 
Reference books, "Greenhouse Management," Taft; "Principles of 
Floriculture," White; and "Practical Floriculture," Peter Hender- 
son. Three lectures per week. Second term. Junior or senior. 

7. Greenhouse Construction and Management. A study of the 
different types of greenhouses and heating, construction, etc. In 
connection with this course, trips to florists and nurseries are taken 
to study the plants and greenhouses. A ground plan, end elevation, 
bill of material and description of heating plant used in a green- 
house required of the students at the end of this course. Actual 
work in greenhouse management is given. Reference book, "Green- 
house Construction," Taft. A laboratory course of three periods 
per week. Winter term. Junior or senior. 

9. Spraying. Lectures on the history and chemistry of spraying. 
Practice in the making and application of spray mixtures accom- 
panied by a study of nozzle and machinery. Three laboratory 
periods per week. Third term. Junior or senior. 

10. Landscape Gardening. A study of the various schools of 
landscape architecture and the plants used in producing the various 
effects. A problem in landscaping is given each student and a draw- 



THE COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 143 

ing showing the solution required. Three lectures per week. Spring 
term. Junior or senior. 

11. Advanced Pomology. A course of three lectures per week 
throughout the year open to seniors. A detailed study of the practi- 
cal and scientific phases of fruit growing forms the basis of this 
course and the work is supplemented by numerous references. 

12. Thesis. A subject relative to any of the following courses, 
"11," "14," "15," or "16" will be assigned to the student for study. 
At the end of the course a thesis, stating the problem, results ob- 
tained, etc., is required of the student. A course of three labora- 
tory periods per week throughout the year. Course "12" must be 
taken by seniors with major in horticulture. 

13. Economic Entomology. A course in practical entomology 
designed especially for use upon the farm. Special attention is paid 
to the identification of insects and a collection is required of the 
student at the end of the work. Three hours per week. Last half 
of the winter term, and all of the spring term. Junior or senior. 

14. Advanced Olericulture. A course of three lectures per week 
throughout the year, open to seniors. A practical and scientific 
study of the problems of vegetable culture, both out doors and 
under glass. Work supplemented with numerous references. 

15. Advanced Floriculture. Three lectures per week throughout 
the year, open to seniors having taken "6" and "7." A study of the 
more practical and scientific problems of flower growing both under 
glass and outdoors. Supplemented with numerous references. 

16. Advanced Landscape Gardening-. Three lectures per week 
throughout the year, open to seniors having taken "10." Landscape 
problems of homes, cities, parks, schools, public buildings, etc., re- 
ceive attention. Work supplemented with numerous problems and 
references. 

(Note: The professor in charge will not be required to give 
Courses "11," "14," "15," or "16" to less than five students, un- 
less the whole senior class in horticulture is less than five, in which 
case he can put all the members of the class into the course most 
acceptable to them). 

17. Vocational Horticulture. The first term of this course will 
deal with historical horticulture and systematic pomology. This will 
be a study of the introduction, dissemination and classification of the 
most common of our fruits. Pomological descriptions will also be 
required. The second term's work will consist of a study of sprays 
and spraying. The causes of injury to trees and fruits will be looked 
into and the methods of making and applying sprays will receive 
close attention. The third term's work will consist of a study of 
landscape gardening similar to Course 10 already offered, special 
attention being paid to the adapting of the course for the use of 



144 UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

teachers in agricultural schools. Parallel reading will be required 
throughout the course. Two lectures and one laboratory period per 
week for the year. Elective for junior and senior in Agricultural 
Education. Professor McHatton. 

18. Summer School Course in Plant Propagation. (See page 102). 

19. Summer School Course in Fruit Growing. (See page 102). 

20. Elements of Horticulture: Fruit Growing. A general study of 
location, site, frost, planting, varieties, orchard tillage and manage- 
ment. Special attention given to the home fruit garden. Historical 
and parallel reading required throughout the course. Lecture course 
of three periods per week. Fall term. Junior. 

21. Pruning and Propagation. A course in grafting, budding and 
other methods of propagation; also a study of pruning with its prac- 
tice and effect. A few periods are devoted to a study of varieties 
both for the orchard and truck garden, some additional practical 
work in the propagation of greenhouse plants given. Parallel read- 
ing required. Laboratory course of three periods per week. Junior, 
winter term. Fee, $2.50. 

22. Elements of Horticulture: Truck Gardening. A general study 
of the main truck crops as to planting, tillage and handling, with 
the addition of a study of hotbeds and their management, special 
emphasis placed on the planting and care of the home vegetable 
garden. Three laboratory periods per week. Junior, spring term. 
Fee, $2.50. 

PLANT PATHOLOGY 

JAMES B. BERRY, Professor. 
E. W. HADLEY, Student Assistant. 
*NEWTON C. BRACKETT, Specialist, Smut Eradication. 
, Extension Pathologist. 

Dendrology or Elementary Botany a prerequisite to all courses in 
Plant Pathology. Plant Pathology 1 prerequisite for Courses 2, 3, 
4 and 5, 7 and 8. 

1. Microbiology. Systematic classification of microbiological or- 
ganisms producing a pathological condition in economic plants. Lab- 
oratory methods. Preparation of materials. Text and collateral 
reading. Three laboratory periods per week, first half-year. One 
and one-half credit. Fee, $2. 

2. Pathology of Field Crops. Important diseases of cotton, ce- 
reals, potato and forage crops. Methods of identification. Life 
cycle. Control. Text and collateral reading. Three laboratory pe- 
riods per week, second half-year. One and one-half credits. Fee, $3. 

3. Pathology of Horticultural Crops. Economic diseases of or- 
chard, vineyard and garden. Identification. Life cycle. Methods 



THE COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 145 

of control. Text and collateral reading. Three laboratory periods 
per week, second half-year. One and one-half credits. Fee, $3. 

4. Dendropathology. Study of forest tree diseases. Identification 
and control. Effect on system of management. Organisms pro- 
ducing decay in wood. Control. Text and collateral reading. Three 
laboratory periods per week, second half-year. One and one-half 
credits. Elective. Fee, $2. 

5. Laboratory Technique. Preparation of media and cultures. 
Artificial inoculations. Sectioning. Mounts. Research methods. 
Text and collateral reading. Three laboratory periods per week, 
entire year. Three credits. Fee, $5. 

6. Plant Diseases. Plant functions. Causes of diseased condition. 
Identification of common diseases of garden and orchard. Control 
measures. Text and collateral reading. Field excursions. Three 
laboratory periods per week, first term or Summer School. One 
credit. Fee, $2.50. 

7. Pathological Problems. Laboratory and field studies along in- 
vestigational lines. Three credits. 

8. History of Plant Pathology. Historical development in plant 
pathology. Three credits. 

POULTRY HUSBANDRY 

J. H. WOOD, Adjunct Professor. 
W. S. DILTS, Instructor. 
MAUDE SMITH, Instructor. 

1. Farm Poultry. A general course covering the farm poultry 
industry, a study of breeds best suited to farm conditions, farm 
poultry house construction, hatching and brooding of chicks, feed- 
ing and management of the farm flock, handling of the poultry 
products. Two one-hour lectures or recitations and one laboratory. 
Freshman. Third term. Professor Dilts. 

la. Farm Poultry. A general course covering the farm poultry 
industry, a study of breeds best suited to farm conditions, farm 
poultry house construction, feeding and general management of the 
farm flock, production of market poultry, grading and marketing 
of poultry products; poultry diseases and parasites. Two one-hour 
lectures or recitations and one two-hour laboratory. Senior, fall 
term. Fee, $1. Professor Dills. 

lb. Poultry Husbandry. A continuation of la. A study of the 
principles of poultry breeding, management of the breeding stock, 
incubation, brooding, the care and feeding of small chicks. Students 
will be required to operate incubators, brooders and care for baby 
chicks. Two one-hour lectures or recitations and one two-hour 
laboratory period. Senior, spring term. Fee, $1. Professor Dills. 



146 UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

2. Poultry Husbandry. Locating and laying out a poultry farm; 
study of the breeds of poultry; judging from the fancy and utility 
standpoint; poultry house construction; poultry house equipment; 
fields, fences and shade; principles of poultry breeding; market 
poultry. Two one-hour lectures or recitations and one laboratory 
period. Must be preceded by Course "1." Junior. Elective. First 
term. Professor Dilts. 

3. Poultry Husbandry. A continuation of Course "2." A study 
of the management of the breeding stock, incubators, incubation, 
brooders, brooding, and the care and feeding of the young chick. 
The student is required to operate an incubator and care for the 
chicks hatched until they are six weeks old. One one-hour recita- 
tion and the equivalent of two two-hour laboratory periods. Must 
be preceded by Course "2." Junior. Elective. Second term. Pro- 
fessor Dilts. 

4. Poultry Husbandry. A continuation of Courses "2" and "3." 
This course takes up the subjects of poultry feeds and feeding, 
management of the laying stock, care of the growing stock, produc- 
tion of market poultry, grading and marketing the poultry products, 
records, accounts, and the disease of poultry. The student is re- 
quired to care for a pen of birds and keep accurate record of the 
■eggs produced, food consumed, and general conditions; with ac- 
counts showing profit or loss. One one-hour lecture or recitation 
and the equivalent of two two-hour laboratory periods. Must be 
preceded by Course "3." Junior elective. Third term. Professr 
Dilts. 

5. Incubation and Brooding Problems. Students that have com- 
pleted Course 1, 2, 3, and 4 are qualified to take up this work. The 
student may make tests regarding incubation, brooding and the 
feeding of the growing chicks. Accurate records must be kept and 
summarized as a thesis. Time to be arranged at the beginning of 
the senior year with the professor in charge. Senior. Elective. 
One credit hour. Professor Dilts. 

6. Feeding Problems. Students who have completed Courses 1, 
3, 3, and 4 are qualified to take up this work. The student may 
make feeding tests with either laying birds or birds to be fattened 
for market. Accurate record's must be kept and summarized as a 
thesis. Time to be arranged at the beginning of the senior year with 
the profsssor in charge. Senior. Elective. Two credit hours. 
Professor Pills. 

(Note: Poultry Husbandry Courses 2, 3, and 4 are offered only 
when elected by not less than three students). 



THE COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 147 

VETERINARY MEDICINE 

W. M. BURSON, Professor. 

J. E. SEVERIN, Junior Professor. 

W. C. BURKHART, Junior Professor. 

H. W. CALDWELL, Junior Professor. 
*C. A. PYLE, Field Veterinarian. 
*E. S. BRASHIER, Specialist, Hog Cholera. 

3. A course of lectures covering briefly the anatomy and phys- 
iology of farm animals. The horse is taken as the basis of study 
and variations in other species are noted. Skeletons, models and 
charts are used to illustrate the lectures. Elective as minor for 
juniors in Agriculture. First, second and third terms. Two hours 
per week. Dr. Bur son. 

4. Laboratory work in the above subjects. One two-hour lab- 
oratory period per week, entire year. Dr. Burson. 

5. A course of lectures on diseases of farm animals. Special at- 
tention being paid to parasitic, infectious, contagious and obstet- 
rical diseases and diseases of young animals. Prerequisite, Courses 
3 and 4. Elective as minor for seniors in Agriculture. First, sec- 
ond and third terms. Two hours per week. Dr. Burson. 

6. Clinics, demonstrations, examinations of sick animals and ex- 
amination of animals for blemishes and unsoundness at veterinary 
hospital. One laboratory period per week, senior year. Dr. Burson. 

BACTERIOLOGY 

1. General Bacteriology. This course is designed to give the stu- 
dent a conception of the activities of bacteria. It treats of the 
biological, physiological and morphological features of bacteria. 
Laboratory work consists of the preparation of media, the making 
of cultures, staining methods and the study of the physiological 
activities of bacteria. One hour lecture and recitation and two lab- 
oratory periods, first half-year. Juniors. Fee, $2.50. Dr. Burkhart. 

3. Bacteriology. Dairy Bacteriology. General Bacteriology is a 
prerequisite. This course is offered in order to give the student in 
Agriculture a more complete knowledge of the organisms with which 
he will come into contact in his practical dairy work. It consists 
in the study of sources, growth and activities of bacteria which are 
to be found in dairy products. Organisms which are pathogenic 
for man and which are usually transmitted through dairy products 
are carefully studied. Pasteurization of milk and dairy sanitation 
are given the attention that their great importance deserves. In- 
fectious diseases of dairy cattle, such as tuberculosis, mastitis and 



* In extension service. 



148 



UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 



infectious abortion, are studied from a bacteriological point of view. 
The laboratory work consists in the isolation and study of the cul- 
tural characteristics of bacteria found around the dairy and in dairy 
products. Organisms essential to the manufacture of butter and 
cheese will be studied. One lecture and two laboratory periods, last 
half-year, juniors in Agriculture. Fee, $2.50. Dr. Burkhart. 

(For courses leading to degree of Doctor of Veterinary Medicine 
see page 84). 

5. Household Bacteriology. General Bacteriology is a prerequi- 
site. A special course in acid fermentation due to the growth of 
bacteria as it occurs in the production of cheese, bread, butter, vin- 
egar, sauer-kraut and other kinds of pickling. Pathogenic bacteria 
which usually contaminate food such as milk, water, and vegetables 
will be studied and the disinfection of contaminated premises con- 
sidered. One lecture and recitation and two laboratory periods. 
Juniors, last half-year. Fee, $2.50. Dr. Burkhart. 

DESCRIPTION OF GENERAL COURSES 



Mathematics 

For courses see page 6 6. 
Civil Engineering 

For courses see page 84. 

Chemistry 
For courses see page 83. 
Biology 

For courses see page 82. 

English 

For courses see page 60. 

Romance Languages 

For courses see page 72. 



German 

For courses see page 62. 

History and Political Science 

For courses see page 63. 

Physics 

For courses see page 90. 

Economics 

For courses see page 88. 

Psychology, Philosophy and 
Education 

For courses see page 91. 

Geology 

For courses see page 62. 



MILITARY DEPARTMENT 

M. B. THWEATT, Captain, Infantry, U. S. A. 

L. H. GORK, Captain, Infantry, U. S. A. 
Under General Orders No. 49 of the War Department, dated Sep- 
tember 20, 1916, a Reserve Officers' Training Corps is established 
at the University of Georgia, and agricultural students are allowed 
full privileges of the organization. The primary object of estab- 
lishing units of the Reserve Officers' Training Corps is to qualify, 
by systematic and standard methods of training, students at civil 
educational institutions for reserve officers. The system of instruc- 
tion presents to all students a standardized measure of military 
training which is necessary in order to prepare them to perform in- 
telligently the duties of commissioned officers in the miltary forces 
of the United States. It enables them to be thus trained with the 
least interference with their civil careers. 



THE COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 149 

CONDITIONS OF SERVICE 

"Eligibility to membership in the Reserve Officers' Training Corps 
shall be limited to students of institutions in which units of such 
corps are established, who are citizens of the United States, who are 
not less than fourteen (14) years of age and whose bodily condition 
indicates that they are physically fit to perform such duties, or will 
be so, upon arrival at military age." Students are required to wear 
the uniform only during drill hours, though they may wear it at all times. 
Under the present ruling of the War Department all students are furnished 
uniforms by the government free of charge. This may, however, be changed 
at any time. 

The military work of the Reserve Officers' Training Corps extends 
over the freshmen and sophomore years, at the conclusion of which 
opportunity will be given for continuing the work with a privilege 
of obtaining a commission as a second lieutenant of the Regular 
Army for a period not exceeding six months, with allowances for 
that grade, and with pay at the rate of $100.00 per month." 

In addition to the regular work at the College, all members of the 
Reserve Officers' Training Corps will be given the privilege of at- 
tending a summer camp, with transportation paid at the rate of 4c 
a mile, and subsistence ration of 40c a day. Each man will also 
receive property valued at $14.67. The young man who remains in 
college for two years receives the commutation of 40 cents a day during his 
first vacation. 

All members of the Reserve Officers' Training Corps who have 
drilled two years in a Junior Reserve Officers' Training Corps unit 
will receive during nine months at the Georgia State College of 
Agriculture $41.83 in clothing, and 40c per day commutation of 
subsistence. The total amounts received by a student in four years 
at college, if he wishes to drill that long, are given below in an 
official memorandum, Unit No. 12, under the date of February 1st, 
1919: 

Senioi* Division 
Each man will receive (actual Additional for those attending 
cost value) : summer camps: 

1 coat, wool, O. D. $ 9.79 2 breeches, cotton, O. D. $ 3.38 

1 breeches, wool, O. D. _ 6.32 1 shoes, russet or march- 

1 shoes, russet or march ing __________ 4.65 

ing : 4.65 1 shirt, wool, O. D. 3.50 

1 shirt, wool, O. D. _ _ _ 3.50 1 leggins, pair, canvas _ 1.05 
1 overcoat, O. D., short _ 13.56 1 hat additional _ _ _ _ 2.00 
1 leggins, pair, canvas_ _ 1.05 1 hat cord _______ .09 

1 hat, service ______ 2.00 

2 collar ornaments _ _ _ .07 

1 hat cord .09 

1 belt ________ .23 

chevrons _______ .57 

Per year $41.83 $14.67 



150 UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

Each man will receive in four years property valued at 

4 y $41.83 $167.32 

Each man will receive in three summers property valued at 

3 y $14.67 44.01 

Each man recommended will receive commutation of sub- 
sistence two years, or 590 days, at 40c per day 236.00 

Each man may receive commutation of subsistence in kind 
(not paid in cash) three summers, 136 days, at 40c per 
day 54.00 

Transportation, average 1,000 per summer, or 3,000 miles 

for three summers, at 4c per mile 120.00 

$621.33 

Average for each of the four years in University course $155.33 

Besides the items mentioned above, equipment issued for 

each student amounts to at least $ 50.00 

The privilege of buying extra uniforms at the above mentioned 
prices from the Quartermaster Department, which will have an 
additional saving value to those who take advantage of it. 

The privilege of special technical training in various fields without 
any tuition charges. 

An opportunity to obtain a commission as second lieutenant of 
the Regular Army for a period not exceeding six months, with al- 
lowances for that grade, and with pay at the rate of $100.00 per 
month. 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN FORESTRY 

JAMES B. BERRY, Professor. 

LOUIS A. ZIMM, Extension Forester. 

E. W. HADLEY, Student Assistant. 

All students wishing to take the degree of Bachelor of Science in 
Forestry must be sixteen years of age and must present credit for 14 
entrance units as specified under "Terms of Admission" on cover 
of this catalog. A degree of B.S.F. is conferred on those completing 
the four-year course. 

In the four-year professional course, opportunity is given to 
specialize in certain main lines. For those students desiring to 
specialize in city forestry an opportunity is offered for the elec- 
tion of landscape gardening and allied subjects; for those desiring 
to specialize in technical forestry, with the object of entering the 
federal or state service, the election of advanced courses in botany 
and forestry; for those desiring to specialize in lumber salesman- 
ship and mill superintendency, the election of courses in economics 
and business administration; for those desiring to specialize in 
dsndropathology, the election of advanced courses in botany, and 
plant pathology. 



THE COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 151 

OUTLINE OF COURSE 

Freshman Year 

Subject Credits 

Chemistry 2, Inorganic Chemistry 3 

Forest 25, Forest Botany, or Botany 1, General Botany 3 

English 1, English Composition 3 

Math. 1, Trigonometry 2 

Forest 19, Principles of Forestry 1 

Forest 4, Dendrology 3 

Ag. Eng. 1, 2, 2a, and 5 or Graphics Dl and D2 3 

Summer Term 

Forest. 7, Forest Mensuration (Part 1) 2 

Forest 12, General Forestry 4 

24 
Sophomore Year 

Ag. Chem. 2b, Qualitative Analysis 3 

Eco. 5, Elements of Economics 3 

Physics 2, College Physics 3 

Agron. 5 and 6, Soil Physics and Fertility % 

Ag. Eng. 5a, Surveying, or Civil Eng. Al 3 

Forest. 5, Silviculture 3- 

Summer Term 

Forest. 7, Forest Mensuration (Part 2) 2 

Forest. 16, Forest Practice 4 

24 

Junior and Senior Years 

Not later than the beginning of the junior year the student is re- 
quired to designate his specialization and must select, with the ad- 
vice and approval of the head of the department, the course of study 
he desires to pursue during the following two years. The major and 
one minor must be selected from technical forestry subjects, one 
minor may be selected from departments in Group I, and twelve 
hours of general electives from departments in Group II. Whether 
or not a student will be permitted to elect more than eighteen hours 
of work a year will depend upon his class record. 

Division of Time 

Hrs. 

Major, Forestry 12 

Minor, Forestry 6 

Minor. Group I 6 

Gen. Electives, Group II 12 



36 



Group I 

Agri. Engineering Botany 



Agri. Chemistry. Plant Pathology 

Horticulture Civil Engineering 

Group II 

General electives may be chosen from any department of the 
College of Agriculture or from any college or school of the Uni- 
versity. 



152 UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 



DESCRIPTION OF COURSES 



1. Forest Policy. The development of policy as reflected in forest 
legislation. A comprehensive study of the forest laws of all coun- 
tries, special stress being placed upon those in which the science of 
forestry has reached a high degree of perfection. A consideration 
of the forest legislation of the various states. The development of 
a policy. Text, lecture, collateral reading. Three hours, third term. 

2. Farm Forestry (Short course for one-year students). General 
consideration of the farm woodlot. Nursery practice practicable on 
farm, field planting, improvement cuttings, measuring forest pro- 
ducts, seasoning and preservative treatment of farm timbers. Lec- 
ture, collateral reading. One laboratory period three hours, first 
term. Fee, $1. 

3. Farm Forestry. Forestry as an adjunct to agriculture. Forest 
influences, nursery practice, field planting, thinnings and improve- 
ment cuttings, protection, estimating timber, wood measurements, 
seasoning and preservative treatment of wood, financial results. 
Text, lecture, collateral reading. One laboratory period, three 
hours, second semester. Fee, $1. 

4. Dendrology. Comprehensive study of the forest trees of North 
America. Taxonomy, botanical and silvical characteristics, range, 
winter and summer identification. Field work in the College arbo- 
retum. Text, lectures, reports, collateral reading. Two laboratory 
periods, three hours, entire year. Fee, $2.50. 

4a. Tree and Shrub Identification. Systematic study of the local 
flora. Winter and summer characteristics. Collection and prepara- 
tion of material for class use. Practical field identification. Text 
:and collateral reading. Preparation of note book and herbarium. 
Three laboratory periods per week, first half-year or Summer School. 
Fee, $2.50. 

5. Silviculture. Forest ecology. Collection and storage of seed. 
Seed testing. Natural and artificial production. Propagation. Lo- 
cation and construction of seed beds. Seeding and care. Trans- 
planting. Field planting. Direct seeding. Silvicultural systems. 
Modifications of European systems adapted to American conditions. 
Text, lecture and collateral reading. Two laboratory periods, en- 
tire year. Three credits. Fee, $2.50. 

5a. Nursery Practice. Growing seedlings. Transplanting. Pro- 
tection and care of nursery stock. Propagation. Nursery inspec- 
tion.. Packing. Practicum work in all phases of nursery business. 
Text, lecture and collateral reading. Three practicum periods, one- 
half year. One and one-half credits. Fee, $2. 

6. Forest Protection. Methods of preventing, fighting and con- 
trolling forest fires. Location and use of lookout-towers, telephones, 



THE COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 153 

wireless and heliographs. Caches for tools and supplies. Maps and 
protection plans. Creating public sentiment and organizing local 
residents. Lecture, collateral reading. One laboratory period. 
Three hours, first term. 

7. Forest Mensuration. Part 1, freshman summer camp. Units 
of measurement, use of volume tables, estimating standing timber, 
log rules, mill scale studies. Text, lecture and field work. Two 
credits. Fee, $5. 

7a. Forest Mensuration. Part 2, sophomore summer camp. For- 
mation of volume tables, growth tables, yield tables. Advanced work 
in estimating standing timber. Text, lecture and field work. Two 
credits. Fee, $5. 

8. Forest Management. First term. Forest organization. Con- 
sideration of the normal forest, volume of growing stock under 
different systems of silvicultural management. Determining the 
felling budget. Division of the forest area. 

Second term. Forest finance. Value of forest property. Value 
based on productive capacity. Forest accounting. Financial rota- 
tion. Problems in forest finance. Taxation of forest property. 

Third term. Working plans. Provision of the plan. Data nec- 
essary for the construction of a plan. Detailed study of a plan for 
a highly specialized forest. Preliminary working plans. Each stu- 
dent is required to make a detailed plan for a small forest area, 
collecting the necessary data himself, drafting his plan and placing 
it in final form filing in the school library. Text, lecture, field work. 
Three hours, entire year. 

9. Forest Utilization. Systematic study of logging operations in 
different sections of North America; character of tools used; wood 
transportation; comparison of costs of the various operations; labor 
conditions; camp, board and sanitation. Milling and manufacture; 
costs, markets, grading. Specialized industries; wood pulp, handles, 
matches, etc. Seasoning of lumber; treatment to prevent stain. 

A report on a specific operation is required. This will be accord- 
ing to outline and will include the woods operations, transport, 
milling, manufacture, utilization of waste, marketing. Each student 
is required to spend not less than ten days in a logging camp and 
around the mill in the collection of data. Text, lecture, collateral 
reading, field work. Three credits, entire year. 

10. Forest History. An analysis of the economic conditions which 
have resulted in the development for forestry. The influence of 
form of government and property rights. Text, lecture, collateral 
reading. Three hours, first term. 

11. Forest Economics. The relation existing between the prac- 
tice of forestry, industry, and the prosperity of a country. Taxa- 
tion. Reports upon the economic importance of specific industries 



154 UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

will be a feature of the course. Text, lecture, reports, collateral 
reading. Three hours, second term. 

12. General Forestry. Elementary forest field work in dendrol- 
ogy, surveying, logging, camping and packing. Training in the 
work of a Forest Service guard. Text, lecture, field work. Fresh- 
man, summer camp, two months. Four credits. 

14. Forest Administration. Contracts, agency, appropriation of 
water for power and irrigation, affidavits, bonds, commercial paper. 
The work will be considered from the standpoint of the Forest Ser- 
vice. Text, lecture, collateral reading. Three hours, third term. 

15. Wood Technology. Structure of wood tissue; classification of 
fibers; identification of woods, generic and specific. Both micro- 
scopic and macroscopic identification will be considered. Each stu- 
dent is required to make a series of microscopic slides for use in the 
course. Text, lecture, reports, collateral reading. Three laboratory 
periods, entire year. Fee, $2.50. 

15a. Wood Identification and Uses. Structure and properties of 
wood. General characteristics. Practical means of identification. 
Effect of stains and oils. Adaptability to specific needs. The sub- 
ject is considered from the standpoint of home furnishing. Text 
and collateral reading, reports. Three laboratory periods, second 
half-year or Summer School. Fee, $1. 

16. Field Work. Field work in forest surveying, silviculture, 
forest soils, logging, engineering, tree diseases. This work will be 
under the supervision of the head of department. Lecture and field 
work. Sophomore, summer camp, two months. Four credits. 

17. Seminar. Systematic review, special investigative studies, 
research. To be considered in connection with Forest "18." Three 
hours, entire year. Three credits. 

18. Thesis. The subject of the thesis is selected in consultation 
with the head of the school and may be along lines of original re- 
search or simply investigative. For students desiring to enter pri- 
vate work it will be along the line of their specialization. The thesis 
must come up to certain specifications and will be filed in the Forest 
School library. Three credits. 

19. Principles of Forestry. Forest influences. Relation of for- 
ests to agriculture, navigation, industry. Results of general de- 
forestation. Products of the forest. Forest areas of the world. 
The movement for the conservation of natural resources. The pro- 
fession of forestry. Lecture, collateral reading. Three hours per 
week, third term. One credit. 

2 0. Forest Reconnaissance. Methods of survey, mapping, and re- 
porting adopted by the U. S. Forest Service. Adjustments and ma- 
nipulation of instruments. Comparative values of different meth- 
ods. Topographic mapping and map reading. Specialized maps for 



THE COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 155 

logging engineering. Working plan maps. Field work and draft- 
ing practices. Six laboratory hours. Three credits. 

21. AYood Utilization. A specialized course in the manufacture 
of wood; machinery, methods, products, special problems. Involves 
a detailed study of a number of wood-working industries. Reports 
according to outline. Lecture, collateral reading, field work.' Three 
hours for entire year. Three credits. 

22. Forest By-products. A study of all industries dependent upon 
the forest for the raw material, the finished product of which is 
not wood in one form or another; turpentine orcharding, maple 
sugar, tan bark and extract wood, gums and resins, wood distilla- 
tion, forest range. Lecture, collateral reading. Three hours, one 
term. One credit. 

23. Grades and Grading. A detailed study of the grading rules 
of the various associations. Practice work in grading. Lecture, col- 
lateral reading, field work. Three hours, one term, one credit. 

24. Mill Organization. The development of the modern sawmill 
and its equipment. Labor efficiency. Various systems of manage- 
ment. Involves a detailed study and report of several operations. 
Lecture, collateral reading, field work. Three hours, one term. 
One credit. 

25. Forest Botany. The subject is treated from the standpoint of 
the forester and furnishes a basis for the work in dendrology and 
silviculture. Text and collateral reading. Three laboratory periods, 
entire year. Fee, $2.50. 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN HOME ECONOMICS 

MARY E. CRESWELL, Director. 

ERNA E. PROCTOR, Junior Professor, Foods and Cookery. 

ROSALIE V. RATHBONE, Junior Professor, Textiles and 

Clothing. 
LOIS P. DOWDLE, Assistant State Supervisor Home 

Economics, Extension Work. 
BESSIE STANLEY WOOD, Assistant State Supervisor 

Home Economics, Extension W T ork. 
MAUDE SMITH, Instructor in Poultry Husbandry. 

The Division of Home Economics has been established in the 
Georgia State College of Agriculture for the purpose of offering 
courses of senior college rank dealing with all phases of scientific 
management of the home. The problems connected with food, cloth- 
ing and shelter will be studied not only from the standpoint of the 
individual home, but also in their social and economic relationships. 
Selection of related courses in science has been based upon the con- 
viction that biology is quite as fundamental as chemistry in its 



15 6 UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

household application and, therefore, should have an important 
place in a course in which students take their major in Home Eco- 
nomics. 

Emphasis is placed upon subjects in agriculture which have special 
interest for women, and courses are arranged to suit their needs in 
the belief that these should be met not only to make the economic 
status of women more secure but also to enrich their lives in aes- 
thetic and ethical ways. 

At the present time no more attractive or profitable employment 
for women can be found than the branches of agriculture which can 
be carried on under intensive methods and which require skill in 
management such as a woman can acquire. The world food situa- 
tion which cannot fail to be acute for several years to come demands 
the utmost endeavor on the part of America. Our women can ren- 
der no higher patriotic service than in work which includes leader- 
ship and skill in food production and conservation and in its use 
in maintenance of health and efficiency. For this reason all the 
facilities of the Georgia State College of Agriculture including the 
regular scientific and applied courses as well as new ones especially 
adapted to their needs are open to women. 

The courses in Home Economics, Agriculture and related sciences 
are offered to meet the needs of women students seeking the fol- 
lowing: 

1. Higher education for the profession of home-making which in- 
cludes general culture and preparation in the broadest sense for 
participation in municipal and rural community upbuilding along 
lines of health, sanitation and economic and social welfare. 

These courses will give further training along lines which here- 
tofore have been inadequately provided for by the state. They open 
opportunity for women in new fields of endeavor and will meet the 
growing demand of the women of Georgia for broader educational 
privileges. 

2. Preparation for positions as county and supervising home dem- 
onstration agents or specialists in extension work in Home Eco- 
nomics. 

3. Preparation for high school teaching in Vocational Home Eco- 
nomics. 

4. Training in institutional management, that is, the management 
of schools, hospitals, hotels from standpoint of diet and feeding; 
lunch rooms, cafeterias, tea rooms, etc. 

5. Preparation for carrying on special lines of agricultural indus- 
try suited to women, such as horticulture (including floriculture and 
greenhouse management), commercial canning and preserving, poul- 
try husbandry, home dairying, plant pathology, etc. 



THE COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 157 

6. Professional training for teaching agricultural subjects re- 
lated to women's work in normal schools and other institutions. 

7. Lines of special technical and research work in which women 
can engage for the State and Federal Governments. 

8. Editorial work in Agriculture and Home Economics. 

GENERAL INFORMATION 

Health. Problems of health will arise in the following courses: 
Dietary Problems, Bacteriology, Dietetics, Home Designing, Home 
Equipment, Household Management, Biology. These problems when 
coordinated will give a systematic study of health. This coordina- 
tion will be accomplished by special conference of instructors. Pro. 
vision will be made for adequate physical education. 

Housing. Careful plans will be made to insure comfortable and 
pleasant facilities for housing at moderate cost. Students boarding 
in Athens will be required to live in homes which have been approved 
by the College authorities. List of approved boarding places can be 
secured in advance. 

Social Activities. Helpful forms of recreation and social inter- 
course will be provided. Organizations to promote public speaking 
and literary and dramatic expression will be encouraged and all 
students expected to take active part in these activities. 

Fees and Other Expenses. In each laboratory course it is neces- 
sary to charge a sufficient fee to cover the cost of materials used and 
breakage incurred. Books will cost about $12.50 a year. There is 
no tuition. 

ENTRANCE REQUIREMENTS 

The degree course in Home Economics requires four years' work 
of college rank based upon entrance consisting of fourteen units 
from an accredited high school or the equivalent. The last two 
years of this course are offered at the State College of Agriculture. 
For admission to the junior class, graduation from a junior college 
is required. Women without such graduation may be admitted to 
the degree course provided they present certificates of equivalent 
work done in institutions of high rank in this state or elsewhere. 
In any case the work done must consist of 36 hours of standard 
college work. 

The two years of college work must include 6 hours English; 6 
hours home economics; 3 hours chemistry; 3 hours physics; 3 hours 
educational psychology; 2 hours elementary drawing and design; 3 
hours of biology (lVfc hours of which may be physiology) and 
10 hours for electives. All science must carry standard laboratory 
work. 

(Note: Provision is made for students who can present two years 



158 UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

standard college work and yet have not had sufficient Home Eco- 
nomics to carry junior work in this subject. Provision is also made 
for a college course in physiology carrying sophomore credit. No 
course will be given unless at least five students apply for it). 

It is desirable that students offer for entrance to the junior class 
the following courses: 

Freshman Sophomore 

Hrs. Hrs. 

English 3 English _3 

Chemistry _______3 Educational Psychology _ _ 3 

Biology — 3 Physiology ________ l 1 /. 

Elementary Drawing and Sociology _________ 1 */_ 

Design _________ 2 Physics 3 

Textiles and Laundering _ 1 y 2 Clothing _________ 1 

Clothing 3 (a) Pattern Designing 

(a) Elementary Garment Food Study _______3 

Making (a) Principles of Cookery 

(b) Elementary Dress (b) Home Cookery and 
Making Table Service 

Elective 2 y 2 Elective 2 

Total hours 18 Total hours 18 

The student who includes physics in her 14 units of high school 
work may offer only iy 2 hours physics for entrance to junior class. 

Normal school graduates upon presenting satisfactory evidence of 
completion of courses in education may receive advanced standing 
for such courses to the extent of 3 credit hours. 

The applicant must further show sufficient maturity and ability to 
do the required work and this ability must be demonstrated during 
first half of the junior year. The qualifications of students will be 
measured not only by formal academic requirements but also by per- 
sonality, individual poise and attitude toward the work undertaken. 

Especial emphasis will be placed upon the student's ability to ex- 
press herself orally and in writing in clear, fluent and correct 
English. 

Courses Offered. The courses offered are professional in charac- 
ter and lead to the degree of Bachelor of Science in Home Econom- 
ics. Students qualifying for this degree will be required to take 
36 hours in the junior and senior years, 12 hours of which must be 
in Home Economics. The division of time in junior and senior years 
shall be as follows: 

Home Demonstration Work. Vocational Home Economics. 

Major _ _ _ _ 12 hours 12 hours 

Minor, Group 1 6 hours 6 hours 

Minor, Group 2 6 hours — hours 

Minor, Group 3 6 hours 9 hours 

Gen. Elective _ 6 hours 9 hours 

36 hours 36 hours 



THE COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 159 

Group 1 Group 2 Group 3 

Chemistry . Horticulture History 

Botany Agronomy Education 

Zoology Poultry English 

Bacteriology Dairying Economics 

Physiology Plant Pathology Sociology 

At the beginning of the junior year the student must submit a 
program written on a prescribed form for the schedule of work in 
the junior and senior years showing her majors and minors, as well 
as her general electives. This program must be approved by the 
head of the division in which she takes b c 5r major. 

The course suggested for students preparing to become county 
agents in Home Demonstration Work includes work in agriculture 
and home economics with carefully related science and is planned 
to give the scientific and technical training needed in this work. 

SUGGESTED COURSE FOR COUNTY AGENTS 

Junior Senior 

Bacteriology 1 and 5 _ _ _ 3 Plant Pathology 6_ _ _ _ _ 1 

Chemistry 1 and 11 3 Poultry Husb. la and 2a _ 2 

Horticulture 20, 21, 22 _ _ 3 Horticulture 10 1 

Home Economics 5, 8 and 9 3 English 2 or 

Education 5a and 9a _ _ _ 2 Economics 5_______3 

Home Economics 44 or 51 _ 1 Education ________ 1V 2 

Home Dairying (A. H. 16 )_ 1 Home Economics 29 _ _ _ 1 

Ag. Eng. 18-19 2 Home Economics 30 _ _ _ 2 

Home Economics 12 _ _ _ iy 2 

Home Economics 13 _ _ _ 1 Ms 

Biological Problems _ _ _ 1 

Electives 2 V 2 

Total hours 18 Total hours 18 

The student who does not expect to teach or do other public work 
but desires preparation for home making may substitute both in 
entrance and in residence requirements other courses than those in 
education provided she offers three credit hours in psychology. 

GENERAL HOME ECONOMICS 

la. Food Study and Cookery. Offered for students who have had 
two years academic training in college but who have had little or no 
work in Home Economics; composition, selection and cookery of 
typical foods, to give a working knowledge of the principles under- 
lying food preparation. One lecture and recitation, two laboratory 
periods, first half-year. Sophomore credit, one and one-half hours. 
Prerequisite, General Chemistry. Fee, $2.50. 

lb. Home Cookery and Tabic Service. Follows Home Economics 
la. Required of students desiring entrance to junior class who have 
not had the required amount of work with foods. Practice in the 
manipulation of foods in family sized quantities; practice in plan- 



160 UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

ning, preparing and serving breakfasts, dinners, luncheons, suppers. 
One lecture and recitation, two laboratory periods, second half-year. 
Sophomore credit, one and one-half hours. Prerequisites, Home 
Economics la. Physiology may parallel if student is not offering 
physiology for junior entrance. Fee, $2.50. 

Physiology. This course is provided for those desiring the re- 
quired physiology for entrance to junior class. It deals with the 
structure and function of the human organs of digestion, absorp- 
tion, circulation, respiration, metabolism and excretion, etc., and 
presents personal hygiene 3 s a means of maintaining health. Two 
lectures and recitations, one laboratory period. Sophomore credit, 
one and one-half hours, second half-year. Prerequisites, General 
Biology, General Chemistry. Fee, $2.50. 

5. Food Preservation. Advanced canning of ifruits and vegetables 
in glass and tin; standardization of products; use of water bath, 
steam pressure canner, thermometer, saccharometer and other ap- 
paratus for securing accuracy in home and community canning; 
drying fruits, vegetables and herbs; making fruit juices, syrups, 
pastes; extraction of pectin, and jelly making; preserving. Junior, 
first term; one lecture and two laboratory periods for half term; 
credit, one-half hour. Fee, $2.50. 

6. Food Preservation. Preserving and crystallizing fruits; fer- 
mentation of vegetables including sauer-kraut, cucumber and chay- 
ote dill pickles; salt brining of cucumbers; finishing pickles from 
salt stock; vinegar making from peaches, apples, pears, figs, grapes; 
canning and curing meats. Senior, first term; one lecture and two 
laboratory periods; credit, one hour. Prerequisites, Bacteriology 
1 and 5. Fee, $2.50. 

8. Dietary Problems. A survey of Georgia food materials and the 
dietary habits of the people to give concrete basis for constructive 
work in applying the principles of cookery previously gained to the 
proper utilization of foods available in the average rural home; 
planning and preparing food combinations which will meet approved 
dietary standards for children and adults, and which can be dupli- 
cated under existing conditions. Special attention to child diet and 
the school lunch. Some experimental cookery included. One lec- 
ture and recitation, two laboratory periods; junior, first and second 
terms following 5; credit, one and one-half hours. Prerequisites, 
Physiology, Elementary Food Study and Cookery. Fee, $2.50. Miss 
Proctor. 

9. Demonstration Cookery. An advanced course with problems 
selected from the general field of food preparation. Special em- 
phasis placed upon skilful manipulation and clear presentation of 
the subject. Second term, juniors or seniors. One lecture and two 



THE COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 161 

laboratories. Prerequisites, same as for 8. Fee, $2.50. Credit, one 
houi\ 

10. Institutional Cooking and Management. Plans for organiza- 
tion and equipment of institution kitchens, dining rooms, lunch 
rooms; practical work in marketing, cooking, serving; catering for 
special occasions. Junior or senior. Prerequisite, college courses 
in cooking and food study required for junior entrance. Credit, 
one and one-half hours, first half of year. Fee, $2.50. 

12. Nutrition. A study of the fundamental principles of human 
nutrition including the function and nutritive properties of the food 
principles; energy values of foods; the chemistry and physiology of 
digestion and metabolism. Senior, first half-year. Two laboratory 
and one lecture; credit, one and one-half hours. Fee, $2.50. Pre- 
requisites, Organic and Food Chemistry; Physiology; Bacteriology. 
Miss Proctor. 

13. Dietetics. Knowledge previously gained in cooking, food 
study, chemistry, physiology and bacteriology summarized and ap- 
plied to the problems of feeding individuals of varying ages and 
conditions and of families and other groups. Topics of study in- 
clude nutritive requirements for individuals considering age, sex, 
occupation, health and disease; relative cost of foods; dietary cal- 
culations. Seniors, second half-year. Two laboratory periods and 
one lecture. Credit, one and one-half hours. Fee, $2.50. Pre- 
requisites, Organic Chemistry; Chemistry of Foods; Physiology; 
Bacteriology 1 and 5. Miss Proctor. 

20. Garment Making. The fundamentals of sewing, hand and 
machine; reading and using commercial patterns, simple decora- 
tions for garments; the mechanism of single and double tread ma- 
chine; study of factory production of garments and economics gov- 
erning it; study of social questions involved. One and one-half 
hours freshman credit, first half-year. 

21. Elementary Dressmaking. The fundamentals of dressmaking; 
simple designs and decoration; reading, testing, use and alterations 
of commercial patterns; applications on both cotton and woolen in 
simple dresses, etc.; a study of the clothing budget. One and one- 
half hours freshman credit, second half-year. 

22. (See Summer School Courses). 

23. Pattern Designing. Making plain foundations waists and 
skirt patterns, fitting and altering patterns and making original de- 
signs, using plain foundation patterns; a study of different type 
figures and pattern designing for them. One hour sophomore credit. 

28. Textiles and Laundering. Study of the textile materials used 
for clothing and house furnishing; development of the textile in- 
dustry; processes of manufacturing cotton, wool, silk, linen; identi- 
fication of fibers by means of microscope; tests of fibers and adul- 



162 UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

terations; suitable fabrics for various uses; cleansing, renovating 
and laundering. One lecture and two laboratory periods. Credit, 
one and one-half hours. Fee, $1.00. Miss Rathbone. 

29. Costume Design. A study of dress including some considera- 
tion of the history of costume; modern requirements from the 
standpoint of simplicity, appropriateness for the occasion, economy, 
hygiene and beauty; applications of the theories of design and color 
in planning costumes. Senior or junior, first half-year. Credit one 
hour. Fee, $1. 

30. Advanced Dressmaking and Millinery. A continuation of 
Costume Design. A study of typical clothing budgets and the eco- 
nomics of planning and purchasing. Problems of advanced tech- 
nique. Applications within these budgets. Junior or senior, second 
half-year. Credit, one and one-half hours. Miss Rathbone. 

43. Home Management. The application of scientific and eco- 
nomic principles to home problems; organization and management 
of household activities; division of the income; household accounts; 
relation of the modern home to industrial life; home ideals and 
standards. Lectures, reading and recitations. One term. Senior. 
Credit, one hour. Plans will be made to have this course supple- 
ment with opportunity for practical application in actual manage- 
ment. 

44. House Furnishing and Decoration.- Application of principles 
of design and color to house furnishings, to finishes for walls and 
floors, selection and arrangement of rugs, draperies, and furniture 
with view to beauty, economy and the sanitary needs of the mod- 
ern house. Lectures, readings, lantern slides, trips to shops, and 
study of materials. Junior, spring term. Credit, one hour. 

51. Organization of Home Demonstration Work. Survey of con- 
ditions, social and economic, which this work is to meet; factors 
and forces in county and community to be recognized and used; con- 
ducting home demonstrations in various activities; methods of or- 
ganizing girls and women; use of the demonstration lecture, exhib- 
its, charts, models, and other means and materials of instruction; 
organization for production, standardization, marketing; social out- 
growths; development of community fairs; recreation and dramatic 
expression; study of material from original sources and field trips 
to observe and take part in actual work. Junior, spring term; three 
lectures and recitation. One hour credit. 

52. Organization of Home Demonstration Work. Continuation of 
Course 51. Senior, winter term. One hour credit. 

Biological Problems of CChildhood and Social Life. This course 
will include a study of genetics, of child development and of the 
biological problems which are involved in the training of children 



THE COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 163 

and in the intimate social relations. Senior, spring term. One 
hour credit. 

9a. Practical Sociology. A course in the elements of sociology 
will be offered to give the student a basis for the study of social life 
and social organization. Brief study of the definitions and meaning 
of sociology and its relation to social problems. Studies of the 
home and family; studies of children and their problems; poverty 
and crime; problems of the city; shifting and growth of population; 
and other important topics. One hour credit, junior, fall term. 

5a. Principles of Rural Life and Education. A brief course in 
rural sociology studying the problems of country life interpreted in 
sound sociological terms. The practical correlation of the farmer 
and his work with school, home, church. Special studies in the 
school, the church, the home, rural aesthetics, rural leadership, co- 
operation with government and others. One hour credit; junior, 
winter term. 

VOCATIONAL COURSES 

The teacher training course in Vocational Home Economics con- 
sists of four years totaling 72 hours as now required for the B.S. 
degree. Under the requirements of the State Vocational Board such 
a course will be required of students qualifying to teach Vocational 
Home Economics after 1921. 

The division of time in the four years shall be as follows: 

Home Economics, technical _ _ _ _35% — 40% 

Related Science and Arts 25% — 25% 

Professional 18% — 25% 

Humanistic 22% — 20% 

Suggested Vocational Course 
Junior Senior 

♦Education ________ 3 Education 3 

(a Education 5a, 9a _2 (a) Voc. Ed. 53 _ -iy 2 

(b) Voc. 54 _ _ _ _ _1 (b) Prac. teaching 1% 

Chemistry: Organic and Voc. Household Equipment 

Food 3 and Management 46 _ _ 3 

Bacteriology 1 and 5 _ _ _ 3 Nutrition, H. E. 12 1% 

Home Economics 5 and 8 _ 2 Dietetics, H. E. 13 _ _ _ _ 1 % 

Home Designing and Fur- Voc. Health 40 ______ 2 

nishing .Voc. H. E. 45) _ iy 2 Biological Problems 1 

Food Study (Voc. 55) _ _ 1 Economics ________ 3 

Voc. Costume Design 31_ _ 1 y 2 Electives ________3 

Voc. Dressmaking and 

Millinery 3 

18 18 

(*Xote: Students who have not had history of education and 
principles of teaching will be required to take three hours of such 
work before being permitted to do practice teaching in the senior 
year). 



164 UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 






There will be required a minimum of one semester practice 
teaching in the senior year. Graduates of a two years' normal school 
course and successful teachers after doing sufficient practice teach- 
ing to show the degree of skill possessed may be given credit for 
previous work. 

The progressive teacher of Vocational Home Economics should 
elect some courses in agriculture which have special bearing upon 
the work of women in the home. 

VOCATIONAL COURSES 

27. Home Economics: Textiles. Materials which are used for 
clothes and furnishings will be studied for the purpose of becoming 
familiar with the different standard fabrics, their quality, value, and 
uses, the manufacturing processes which influence these, and the 
relation of clothing materials to health of the family. The prac- 
tical work includes tests for deferentiation of fibres and weaves, and 
for adulterations, and for the effects of different reagents used in 
removing common household stains. First semester, one and one- 
half hours. 

31. Costume Design. This course deals with the problems of 
teaching women at home how to design clothes for different types of 
people for all occasions. The problems will include the use of color 
and color combination, the effect of different textures, etc. Junior, 
first semester, one and one-half hours. 

32. Dressmaking and Millinery. This course follows costume de- 
signing and is based upon it. It will include the advanced technique 
of construction and how to teach it to groups of vocational, home- 
making students. The problems will be selected with particular ref- 
erence to those of a teacher of vocational classes, such as making 
flat, draped and modeled patterns from original designs and pic- 
tures, and treatments to secure the most finished garments. In mil- 
linery simple shapes, alteration of shapes and different types of 
decoration will be considered. Junior, second semester, three hours. 

4 0. Health. Vocational home-making relationships: 

(a) Personal hygiene, child and adult. 

(b) Illness, preventive and curative measures in the home. 

(c) Community hygiene. Senior, fall and winter terms; two 

hours. 
45. Home Economics: Home Designing and Furnishing. The lo- 
cation, structure and structural sanitation will be considered in de- 
signing homes for typical families. This will be followed by a study 
of artistic furnishings and decoration possible for families of dif- 
ferent incomes and in different location. The problems will be 
based upon how to teach this to home makers. Junior, first semes- 
ter; one and one-half hours. 



THE COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 165 

46. Home Equipment and Management. Treated from vocational 
standpoint including following topics: 

(a) Economics of household and of household purchasing. 

(b) Organization of work. 

(c) Sanitation, care and renovation. Senior; three hours. 

53. History and Development of Education in Home Economics. 
This course includes a survey of the development of home economics 
in education; its place in the education of young women with special 
stress upon home making as a vocation. A study will be made of 
the social and economic importance of home economics and of the 
influence of vocational education upon it. Junior or senior. Lec- 
ture first semester, one and one-half hours. 

5 4. Methods and Materials in Vocational Home Economics. Dif- 
ferent vocational courses will be studied with reference to the con- 
tent, time allotment, and adaptation to demand for such. Types of 
materials, teaching, and equipment will also be considered. Junior. 
Spring term; one hour. 

55. Teaching Foods and Cookery in Vocational Schools. This 
course includes a survey of the present status of the teaching of 
foods and cookery in secondary schools; an analysis of the essential 
elements to be considered in standardizing courses of study for vo- 
cational classes; a study of the influence of the community on the 
work; surveys of communities leading to the organization of courses 
of study; a study of methods of presentation of subject matter, etc. 
Junior, two lectures, one laboratory; spring term, one hour. 

(For courses in Poultry Husbandry, Horticulture, Chemistry, An- 
imal Husbandry, Forest Plant Pathology, etc., refer to descriptions 
under the various heads). 

SHORT COURSES 

During the college year of 1918-19 a short course of three months 
was established, in which students qualifying for junior work can 
receive college credit for a term's work. This course is planned 
especially to aid the county agent who desires advanced work but 
can be absent from her work for a limited period of time. 

DOCTOR OF VETERINARY MEDICINE 

W. M. BURSON, Professor. 

J. E. SEVER1N, Junior Professor. 

W. C. BURKHART, Junior Professor. 

H. W. CALDWELL. Junior Professor. 
*C. A. PYLE, Field Veterinarian. 
*E. S. BRASHIER, Specialist, Hog Cholera. 



* In extension work. 



166 



UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 



A full four-year course in veterinary medicine leading to the de- 
gree of D.V.M. (Doctor of Veterinary Medicine) is offered. 



Outline of Course 



Freshman 



Hrs. 

Anatomy I, II 6 

Animal Husbandry 2, 3, 4, 5 _ 3 
Chemistry _________3 

English 3 

Anatomy V. ________2 

Vet. Physiology 1_ 3 

Total, Veterinary Subjects 20 

Military Science 1 



Sophomore 



Hrs. 
Anatomy III, IV. ______ 6 

Anatomy VI, (Embryology) _ 1 
Animal Husbandry 8a and 9a 3 
Bacteriology 1 and 2 _ _ _ _ 3 

Biology 3 3 

Agr. Chem. 1, (Organic) _ _ 3 
Vet. Physiology 2 2 

Total, Veterinary Subjects 21 



Total for Course 21 Total for Course 21 



Junior 

Hrs. 

Infectious Diseases _____ 3 

Pathology 1 3 

Surgery 1_________3 

Materia Medica _______2 

Pharmacy _________2 

Therapeutics ________1 

Physical diagnosis ______ 1 

Clinics __________2 

Horseshoeing ________ 1 

Parasitology 2 

Total Veterinary Subjects _ _20 
Military Science 3 



Senior 

Hrs. 
Diseases and Surgery Sm. an._ 3 
Special Surgery _______ 3 

Special Pathology & Lab. diag. 3 
Noninfectious Diseases _ _ _ 3 
Food Inspection _______ 2 

Opthalmology 1 

Obstetrics _________2 

Clinics 2 

Jurisprudence _______! 



Total, Veterinary Subjects 20 

Military Science 3 



Total for Course 23 Total for Course 23 

Elective in junior and senior years: 

Serum Therapy (Bacteriology 4) 2 hrs. 

Dairy Bacteriology (Bacteriology 3) 1^5 hrs. 

COMPARATIVE ANATOMY 

Dr. J. E. Severin. 

Anatomy, being the basic subject of all medical science, must re- 
ceive careful attention at 'the hands of students. The subject 
is taught by means of lectures, recitations, demonstrations and dis- 
sections. All cadavers used are preserved by the intravascular in- 
jection of formalin, thus facilitating the work and eliminating the 
possibility of putrefaction and infection. The work given is divided 
in the following manner: 

Anatomy 1. Osteology and Arthology. This consists in the study 
of the bones and joints. Drawings are made by each student in 
order that he may have a good mental picture of their shapes and 
characteristic parts. Freshman. First term. Three lectures and 
three two-hour laboratory periods per week. 



THE COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 167 

Anatomy 2. Myology and Spanchnology. The study of the 
muscles and viscera. The student is required to make a complete 
dissection of the horse, paying particular attention to the above 
structures. Second and third terms. Three lectures and three two- 
hour laboratory periods per week. Prerequisite, Anatomy 1. 

Anatomy 3. Angiology and Neurology. The study of the organs 
of circulation and the nervous system. The cadavers used are pre- 
served as mentioned above and the arterial system is injected villi 
a suitable mass. Sophomore. First and second terms. Three lec- 
tures and three two-hour laboratory periods per week. Prerequisite, 
Anatomy 1 and 2. 

Anatomy 4. Comparative Anatomy. Consists of the study of the 
variations in form and structure of corresponding organs and parts 
of the various domestic animals. Dissections of the ox, hog and 
dog will be made sufficient to acquire a knowledge of the principal 
differential features in these animals as compared to the horse. 
Sophomores. Third term. Three lectures and three two-hour lab- 
oratory periods per week. Prerequisite, Anatomy 1, 2 and 3. 

Throughout the course given thus far the student's attention is 
continually called to those aspects of anatomy which are most di- 
rectly related to diagnosis and surgical procedure. 

HISTOLOGY 

Dr. H. TV. Caldwell. 

Anatomy 5. Histology. A study of the microscopic structure of 
animal tissues. Students study the tissues under the microscope 
and are required to be able to identify specimens of all tissues. The 
preparation and mounting of sections will be taken up if time per- 
mits. One lecture and two two-hour laboratory periods per week. 
Freshmen. First and second terms. 

EMBRYOLOGY 

Dr. H. W. Caldwell. 

Anatomy 6. Embryology. A study of reproduction and the de- 
velopment of the embryo. Two lectures and one two-hour laboratory 
period per week. Sophomores. First term. Prerequisite, Anatomy 
1, 2 and 5 and Physiology 1. 

VETERINARY PHYSIOLOGY 

Dr. TV. M. Burson. 

Veterinary Physiology 1. A study of the normal functions of the 
animal body. The course is intended to give the student a thorough 
understanding of the vital processes of respiration, circulation, di- 
gestion, assimilation, excretion and secretion, in order that he may 
appreciate the benefits to be derived from proper hygienic condi- 



168 UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

tions, the selection and proper uses of feed stuffs and proper methods 
of handling livestock. The course consists of lectures, demonstra- 
tions and laboratory work. Charts, models and other appliances 
are used to illustrate the work of the course. Two lectures and one 
two-hour laboratory period per week. Text, "A Manual of Veter- 
inary Physiology," by F. Smith. Freshmen; entire year. 

Veterinary Physiology 2. The physiology of the nervous system, 
enervation, locomotion, generation and development. Prerequisite, 
Physiology I and Anatomy I and II. Lectures, demonstrations and 
laboratory work. Sophomores, three hours per week, first and sec- 
ond terms. 

BACTERIOLOGY 
Dr. W. C. Burkhart. 

1. General Bacteriology. This course is designed to give the stu- 
dent a conception of the activities of bacteria. It treats of the 
biological, physiological and morphological features of bacteria. 
Laboratory work consists of the preparation of media, the making of 
cultures, staining methods and the study of physiological activities 
of bacteria. Two hours of lectures and recitation and one labora- 
tory period. First half-year. Sophomore. 

2. Pathogenic Bacteriology. A knowledge of general bacteriology 
is a prerequisite. This consists of a study of pathogenic bacteria, 
e. g., pus cocci, tuberculosis, glanders, anthrax and tetanus. The 
work consists of the observation of cultural characteristics and the 
study, of the pathogenic significance of the organisms; the methods 
of bacteriological diagnosis, such as isolation and agglutination and 
the means of treatment by the use of vaccines and anti-serum. Two 
hours of lectures and recitations and one laboratory period. Second 
half-year. Sophomore. * 

3. Dairy Bacteriology. Bacteriology 1, prerequisite. This course 
is offered in order to give the student in agriculture a more complete 
knowledge of the organisms with which he will come in contact 
in his practical dairy work. It consists in the study of the sources, 
growth and activities of bacteria that are to be found in dairy 
products. Organisms pathogenic for man and which are usually 
transmitted through dairy products are carefully studied. Pasteur- 
ization of milk and dairy sanitation are given the attention that their 
great importance deserves. Infectious diseases of cattle, such as 
tuberculosis, mastitis and infectious abortion are studied from a bac- 
teriological point of view. The laboratory work consists in the 
isolation and study of the cultural characteristics of bacteria found 
around the dairy nnd in dairy products. Organisms essential to the 
manufacture of butter and cheese will be studied. One lecture and 
two two-hour laboratory periods per week. Last half-year. Juniors 
in Agriculture and juniors in Veterinary Degree Course. 



THE COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 169 

4. Serum Therapy. Bacteriology 1, 2, prerequisite. A detailed 
study of infection and theories of immunity. The various paths of 
entrance and elimination of infection into and from the body will 
be fully discussed. The general question of anti-body formation 
will be carefully considered. The various types of therapy (serum, 
vaccine, chemo) will be studied. The work will also include a con- 
sideration of the various infectious diseases and the relation of im- 
munity and serum therapy. 

In the laboratory anti-toxins, vaccines, tuberculin, and mallein 
will be prepared. Standardization of antitoxins, complement and 
methods of demonstrating agglutins will be conducted. Comple- 
ment fixation tests and anaphylactic reactions will be demonstrated 
in the laboratory. Two lectures and two two-hour laboratory pe- 
riods, entire year. Elective to juniors and seniors in Veterinary 
Course. Two or four hours credit. The lecture course having a 
credit of two hours and the complete course a credit of four hours. 

COURSES IN VETERINARY MATERIA MEDICA AND 

PHARMACY 

Prof. R. C. Wilson. 

Veterinary Materia Medica. This course will correlate with the 
courses in Veterinary Pharmacy and Therapeutics. An intimate 
study of all substances from which medicinal agents are prepared 
will be made, including those from the inorganic, vegetable and 
animal kingdoms. Identification of these substances in the crude 
and purified state will be made, their physical and chemical prop- 
erties noted, their actual constituents and proper solvent determined 
and their toxic properties and antidotes tabulated. On the whole, 
the course is intended to establish the proper foundation for the 
study of Therapeutics, which is taken up later. Juniors, first and 
second terms, three hours per week. 

Veterinary Pharmacy. This course will embrace a close study of 
those preparations which will be used in actual practice, including 
waters, spirits, tinctures, fluid extracts, extracts, liniments, pills, 
boli, tablets, ointments, etc. Their manufacture will be entered 
into in the laboratory and their physical and chemical properties 
•demonstrated. The subjects of solvents, keeping qualities, modes of 
administration, incompatabilities, doses and prescription writing will 
receive ample attention. Juniors, second and third terms, three 
hours per week. 

VETERINARY THERAPEUTICS 

Dr. if. W. Caldwell. 
Veterinary Therapeutics. This course is to be considered a con- 
tinuation of the work in Materia Medica and is devoted to study 



170 UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

and instruction in the use of drugs on the various organs and parts 
of the body and their use in the treatment of diseases of farm ani- 
mals. The work in Materia Medica is a prerequisite. Juniors, three 
hours per week, third term. 

PATHOLOGY 

Dr. TV. M. Burson. 

1. General Pathology. A course of lectures and recitations in the 
subject of general pathology. The cause of disease, pathological 
phenomena in general, inflammation, fever, the protective and repar- 
ative forces of the body, retrogressive disturbances and infiltrations, 
hypertrophy and tumor formations are considered. All departures 
from normal and physiological conditions receive the attention nec- 
essary to familiarize the student with the subject. Prerequisite, 
Physiology 1-2 and Bacteriology 1-2. Three lectures per week, 
junior year. 

2. Special Pathology. Autopsies and Laboratory Diagnosis. A 
consideration of pathological conditions of the various organs and 
parts of the body, preparation, examination and identification of 
pathological specimens under the microscope constitute the greater 
part of the work. Autopsies of all animals that die in the hospital 
and such other autopsies as may be available for diagnostic pur- 
poses will be conducted by the students under the supervision of the 
professor in charge. Prerequisite, Pathology 1. Lectures, labor- 
atory work and autopsies. Three hours per week, senior. 

3. Food Inspection. A course designed to cover in a broad sense 
the subject of meat inspection and dairy and milk inspection. Based 
In a general way upon the requirements of the Federal Meat In- 
spection Law, but taking also into consideration these subjects as 
applicable to municipalities and rural districts. The purpose in view 
being to prepare the student for efficient work along food inspection 
lines. Sanitary construction of abatttoirs, dairy barns and milk 
houses receive attention. Post mortem examinations of meat pro- 
ducing animals will be conducted. Visits to large slaughtering es- 
tablishments and dairies will be made. Tests of milk and bacterial 
examinations will receive attention. Prerequisites as for Pathology 
2. Three hours per week, two terms, senior year. 

4. Parasitology. A study of the animal parasites infesting farm 
animals and fowls. Classification, life history, means of propagation, 
identification, diseased condition produced by infestation, methods 
of control and eradication will be considered. Lectures and lab- 
oratory work. Three hours per week, two terms, junior year. 



THE COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 171 

COMPARATIVE MEDICINE 

Dr. E. TV. Caldwell. 

1. Infectious Diseases. In this course the various infectious dis- 
eases of animals are studied. These are taken up in a systematic 
manner and consideration is given to prevalence, etiology, symptom- 
atology, anatomical alterations, treatment, methods of prevention, 
control and eradication. In connection with this course clinics will 
be conducted, at which students will be trained in diagnosis and 
therapeutics. Three hours of lectures and recitations per week, 
junior year. 

2. Non-Infectious Diseases. All the diseases not classed as infec- 
tious and which affect the domestic animals will be considered in 
this course. The various organs of t^e body will be studied with 
reference to the diseases affecting them. Comparisons will be made 
of the various diseases as they affect the various species of animals. 
Students will be required to take the course in Clinics, to diagnose 
and administer treatment and to keep record of lectures and Clin- 
ics. Prerequisite, Pathology 1 and Infectious Diseases. Three hours 
per week of lectures and recitations, senior year. 

SURGERY 

Dr. J. E. Severin. 

1. General Surgery. In this course wound dressing, suturing, 
local and general antiseptics, asepsis and surgical procedure in gen- 
eral are studied. Diseases of bones, muscles, nerves and other im- 
portant structures receive consideration. Special attention is given 
to hernias, fractures, concrements and neoplasms. Lectures and 
recitations, three hours per week, junior year. 

2. Special Surgery. A consideration of the surgical diseases of 
the various regions of the body. The work is discussed in detail in 
lectures and recitations. Following this the students will be re- 
quired to perform at least all the common operations, under the 
guidance of the instructor, upon subjects anesthetized especially for 
the occasion. Dentistry and lameness are included in this course. 
Three hours per week of lectures and recitations and laboratory ex- 
ercises, ■senior year. 

Clinics. Daily clinics will be held at the hospital and junior and 
senior students will be assigned to the care of patients and required 
to diagnose cases and to recommend and administer treatment under 
the supervision of the professor in charge and to assist at all opera- 
tions. Junior and senior years, two hours credit. 

Physical Diagnosis. A course closely related to the courses in 
diseases, surgery and clinics. A systematic study of the methods 
used to recognize or identify disease in the Irving animal. One term 



172 UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

of lectures, recitations and demonstrations in the junior year. One 
hour credit. 

Horseshoeing. A special study of the foot of the horse, its ab- 
normalities and diseases and the methods of shoeing and balancing 
used to overcome the evil conditions. Three hours per week of lec- 
tures, recitations and demonstrations during one term, junior year. 

Diseases and Surgery of Small Animals. In this course the dis- 
eases of the dog, cat and poultry, infectious, non-infectious, and the 
surgical operations practiced upon them will be studied in detail. 
With respect to the infectious diseases, methods of prevention, con- 
trol and eradication will be stressed. Special wards for small ani- 
mals are provided in the hospital and surgical cases will be handled 
along approved lines. Lectures, clinics and surgical exercises and 
operations constitute the bulk of the course. Students will be placed 
in charge of small animals in the hospital and held responsible for 
care and treatment. Seniors, three hours per week, entire year. 

Opthamology. A study of the eye and its appendages, together 
with a study of the diseases, abnormalities, accidents and other in- 
juries to which it is subject. Treatment of the various diseases of 
the eye and surgical procedure receive the attention necessary. Lec- 
tures, demonstrations, clinics and surgical exercises constitute the 
work of the course. Three hours per week during one term, senior 
year. 

Obstetrics. A course of study in the anatomy and physiology of 
the organs of reproduction of the female, the diseases incident to 
pregnancy and parturition and the disease of newborn animals. Lec- 
tures, anatomical demonstrations and clinics constitute the work of 
the course. Three hours per week, two terms, seniors. 

VETERINARY JURISPRUDENCE 

Sylvan us Morris, Professor of Law. 

A course of lectures on law as it applies to the veterinarian as a 
practitioner, as an official of the government, state and municipality; 
his rights and liabilities and his responsibilities as a professional 
man. Legal principles, federal, state and municipal laws, acts and 
ordinances affecting the veterinarian receive the necessary attention. 
Three hours per week during one term of senior year. 

(Note: For description of course in Animal Husbandry, Biology, 
Chemistry and English see under the various departments men- 
tioned). 



THE COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 173 

ONE-YEAR COURSE 

This course commences at the opening of the fall session and con- 
tinues throughout the collegiate year. The purpose of this course 
is to provide suitable instruction for those who can only remain 
in college for one year. An effort has been made, therefore, to con- 
dense the work as much as possible, provide a correct scientific 
foundation and yet make the instruction of a very practical nature. 
An outline of the one-year course follows. The schedule indicates 
the number of hours required in each subject and the amount of 
time devoted to class-room and laboratory work. Notice that the 
laboratory instruction has been emphasized as this is considered the 
best way of demonstrating the value of applied science to the solu- 
tion of the problems of the farmer. Students entering this course 
who are capable of carrying the freshman mathematics for English 
may be permitted to do so upon the approval of the president of 
the College. 

ONE-YEAR REQUIREMENTS 

First Term 

Hours. Periods. 

English 3 

Arithmetic 3 

Cotton and Cotton Grading 2 1 

Cereal Judging __ 1 

Chemistry 3 

Iron and Woodwork __ 3 

Horticulture 3 1 

Forestry 2 1 

Botany 3 

Veterinary Medicine 3 

22 7 

Second Term 

English '. 3 

Arithmetic 3 

Cereals 2 

Soils 3 

Farm Machinery __ 1 

Horticulture 3 1 

Dairying 1 2 

Feeds and Feeding 3 1 

Farm Management 2 

Veterinary Medicine 2 1 

22 6 



174 UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

Third Term 

English 3 

Farm Accounts 3 

Grass and Forage Crops 3 1 

Soil Fertility 3 

Plumbing and Pipe Fitting __ 1 

Horticulture 3 1 

Farm Buildings __ 1 

Practice Work, Animal Husbandry __ 1 

Surveying 3 1 

Breeds and Breeding 3 2 

Veterinary Medicine 2 

23 8 

AGRONOMY (One-year Course) 

Cereals and Cereal Judging. The history, use and cultivation of 
the different cereals is studied. Especial attention is given to seed 
selection as influencing the yield of farm crops. A study of the 
various cereals, especially corn, is made by the use of the score card. 
First term. Two one-hour recitations and one laboratory period. 
Professor Rast. 

Farm Management. An examination of the various business meth- 
ods employed on different classes of farms is first undertaken. Spe- 
cial attention is given to systematizing the work and determining 
the effect of various rotations on the maintenance of fertility. A 
stereopticon is used to show how various kinds of farms should be 
arranged so as to conduct the business with the greatest economy. 
Second term. Professor Fain. 

Grass and Forage Crops. A study is made of the various grasses 
adapted to this state that can be utilized to the best advantage for 
pasture and hay. The uses of the forage crops, especially the 
legumes, are given considerable attention. Methods of growing and 
preserving silage are considered at length, as this is undoubtedly 
the best form for preserving forage crops in the south. Third term. 

Soils. A study of the physical properties of soil is made, and the 
effect of good and poor mechanical conditions on crop production is 
demonstrated. Methods of improving the physical conditions are 
studied. Special attention is given to the water-holding capacity of 
the soil, and the best methods of conserving soil moisture. Second 
term. Three one-hour recitations. 

Soil Fertility. The different fertilizing ingredients and their func- 
tion in plant growth will be discussed. Methods of mixing fertil- 
izers and determining the formulas best adapted to different soils 
are studied. The effect of rotation of crops on soil fertility and the 



THE COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 175 

draft of the different crops on the soils also receive attention. Third 
term. Three one-hour recitations. 

COTTON INDUSTRY (One-year course) 

Emphasis is laid on the importance of seed selection. A study of 
types of plants with special reference to their yielding capacity 
is made, and the conditions affecting length, strength, uniformity, 
quality and quantity of fiber. Some attention is given to combing 
and grading cotton, and all varieties are studied in the laboratory. 
There is a complete set of grades of long staple and upland lint 
cotton in the laboratory for inspection and comparison, and students 
are required to grade by the samples, after the basis of grading has 
been pointed out. Second term. Two one-hour recitations. One 
laboratory period. Professor Rast. 

ANIMAL HUSBANDRY (One-year course) 

Breeds and Breeding. A practical course will be given in the study 
of domesticated animals, and a consideration of the fundamental 
laws underlying their production. Three one-hour recitations. Third 
term. Professor Jar nag in. 

Dairying. In this course lectures will be given on the principles 
of modern dairying and on the manufacture of butter, cheese and 
other products. Practice work in the operation and repair of dairy 
machines will be required of all students. The use of the Babcock 
test and other apparatus for the detection of adulteration of milk 
will be fully explained. Two lectures and two laboratory periods. 
Second term. Professor Taxis. 

Feeds and Feeding. In this course a study of the various feeding 
stuffs for maintenance, development of bone and muscle, produc- 
tion of milk and butter, and for maintaining and fattening farm ani- 
mals will be discussed and explained. Three one-hour recitations 
and one laboratory period. Second term. Professor Taxis. 

Stock Judging. Scoring, judging and classifying the various 
classes of farm live stock will be an important part of this course. 
After the student has become proficient in the use of the score card, 
work will be given in comparative judging and show-ring placing. 
The standard of excellence as established by the several breeders' 
associations will also be given some attention. Third term. Two 
laboratory periods. Professor Taxis, 

HORTICULTURE (One-year course) 

Orchards. A study of orchards as to location, site, exposure, cul- 
tivation, fertilization, planting, pruning, spraying, thinning, harvest- 
ing and marketing. Books to be used, "Principles of Fruit Grow- 
ing." Three one-hour lectures and one laboratory period per week. 
First term. 



176 UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

Propagation and Pruning. A study of budding, graftng, and 
other methods of plant manipulation and propagation, with a course 
in the principles and practice of pruning. Three lectures and one 
laboratory period per week. Second term. 

Small Fruit and Trucking. A course in the management of small 
fruit plantations and truck gardens, following much the same order 
as the orchard course. Particular attention will be given to the 
construction and management of hotbeds as well as to the principal 
small fruit and vegetable crops of the section. Three lectures and 
one laboratory period per week. Third term. 

AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING (One-year course) 

AYood Work. This includes the care and use of wood working 
tools. It will be made as practical as possible. The majority of the 
exercises will consist of the construction of articles that will be 
needed on the farm, such as gates, fences, wagon beds and other 
farm conveniences. First term. Two laboratory periods. Professor 
Welch, 

Forge Work. This course includes welding and shaping of iron 
and handling of steel. Considerable attention will be paid to the 
making and tempering of small hand tools. A student after taking 
this course should be able to do all of the ordinary repairs of farm 
machines and other blacksmithing that will be necessary in farm 
work. First term. Two laboratory periods per week. Mr. Kirk. 

Farm Machine Judging. A study of the principles of construc- 
tion and operation is made. Considerable time is given to studying 
the different farm machines. Some time is devoted to motors, espe- 
cially gasoline and steam engines. Third term. Two laboratory 
periods. Professor Welch. 

Farm Building and Fences. The strength and adaptability of the 
materials available for construction are first determined. Principles 
of construction are studied and considerable time is given to plan- 
ning the different farm buildings with especial regard to convenience 
and sanitation. The use of concrete on the farm and principles of 
concrete construction are demonstrated. Laboratory practice con- 
stitutes an important part of the work. Professor Welch, 

Farm Engineering. Instruction is given in the use of the instru- 
ments necessary in surveying farm lands and terracing. Some time 
is given to terracing and leveling. Professor Welch. 

Plumbing and Pipe Fitting. A short course in plumbing and pipe 
fitting is given in connection with farm building. It consists of the 
location and planning of the water supply and drainage away from 
the home, and the proper laying out of a perfectly sanitary system 
of plumbing for buildings. The proper assembling and selection of 



THE OOLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 177 

the material needed for a complete job, and the calking of joints are 
studied. Mr. Kirk. 

VETERINARY MEDICINE (One-year course) 

1. Consists of lectures in the anatomy and physiology of the 
horse, with brief notices of the variations occurring in the other 
farm animals. Lectures on materia medica cover the more com- 
monly used drugs and medicines, paying particular attention to the 
action and dosage of the drugs. First term. Three hours per week. 

2. Consists of lectures on theory and practice and surgery; deals 
with the most common diseases of the horse and cow, the minor 
operations that are performed on these animals, and the care of sur- 
gical and accidental wounds. Second term. Two hours per week. 

3. Consists of free clinics held at the veterinary hospital. One 
hour per week. Second and third terms. 

4. Consists of lectures on obstetrics and dentistry. Two hours 
per week. Third term. 

AGRICULTURAL CHEMISTRY (One-year course) 

This course is planned to prepare the student for intelligent study 
of the chemistry of soils, fertilizer and foods. At first the elements 
and compounds most important to agriculture are taken up. The 
composition of farm crops, and the application of chemistry to plant 
and animal life are studied. Text, "Chemistry of Farm Practice,"" 
by Keitt. This course consists of three lectures during the first 
term. Professor Carter. 

FORESTRY (One-year course) 

A study of forestry as applied to farm woodlands. How to secure 
a stand of timber, how to thin, to protect, and harvest the forest 
crop. First term. Two one-hour lectures and one two-hour prac- 
tice periods. Professor Berry. 

ONE-YEAR COURSE IN FOREST ENGINEERING 

The One-year Course in Forest Engineering, or Lumberman':- 
Short Course, has been inaugurated to supply the demand for a 
short, practical training in lumbering with special emphasis on the 
engineering aspect of the subject. Such a course does not prepare 
a man for professional forestry or engineering, rather it fits him for 
a position as woods foreman, yard boss, scaler, cruiser or surveyor. 
Under Civil Service rules he may compete for the position of Forest. 
Ranger, a position carrying with it a salary of $900 to $1200 per 
year. With the large lumber companies he must be willing to begirt 
at the bottom, but ability is quickly recognized and the reward is 
certain. Many men have advanced to positions of responsibility ia 
the course of a few years. 



178 



UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 



The practical side of the work is emphasized during the -entire 
year, but especially during the fourth term in the woods. Each 
branch of the work is first considered theoretically, and is then 
followed by practice in the field. The student is required to work 
through each operation in logging and milling, scaling and cruis- 
ing. Efficiency will be judged by practical demonstration. 

The school year is made up of four terms, extending from the 
opening of the university year (September 20) to the close of the 
Summer Camp (August 20). The first three terms are spent at 
the University, the fourth term in Forest Camp. A certificate of 
the College is awarded those who successfully complete the pre- 
scribed work. 

Terms of Admission 

The One-Year Course is open to men of good character who have 
attained the age of eighteen years, and who have had sufficient 
education to enable them to pursue the work profitably. Prospec- 
tive students should have had at least six months experience in some 
"woods" operation. 

Outline of One-Year Course 



First Term, Sept. 20-Dec. 22 

Mensuration 
Dendrology 
Utilization 
Forest Mapping 
Wood Technology 
English Composition 

Third Term, Mar. 19-June 16 

Mensuration 

Dendrology 

Mill Organization 

Reconnaissance 

Lumber Accounting 

English Composition 



Second Term, Jan. 2-Mar. 17 

Mensuration 

Dendrology 

Milling and Grading 

Reconnaissance 

Forest Byproducts 

English Composition 

Fourth Term, June 18- Aug. 18 

Practice work in 
Estimating Timber 
Scaling 
Surveying 
Logging 
Milling 



Description of Courses 

Dendrology. Classification and identification of the forest trees 
of the United States, special emphasis being placed upon the flora 
of the Southeastern States. Distinctive characteristics, range and 
importance. Text and collateral reading; three hours, first, second 
and third terms. 

Mensuration. Mathematics of timber estimation, wood measure- 
ments, scaling logs, volume tables, estimating standing timber, use 
of tables. Text and collateral reading; three hours, entire year. 

Utilization. Detailed study of logging operations in different 
portions of the Unitted States with special emphasis upon those 
methods in use in the Southeastern States; equipment; labor; in- 



THE COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 179 

vestment; costs. Text and collateral reading; three hours, first 
term. 

Milling and Grading. Detailed study of milling operations; grad- 
ing rules and practices; equipment. Lecture and collateral reading; 
three hours, second term. 

Mill Organization. Organization of saw mill; equipment; effi- 
ciency; investment; costs; labor. Lecture and collateral reading; 
three hours, third term. 

Forest Mapping. Map reading; signs and symbols; topographic 
features; field maps; construction of map; relief mapping; platting 
notes. Collateral reading and practice work; three practicum pe- 
riods, first term. 

Reconnaissance. Methods of survey and timber estimation adopt- 
ed by United States Forest Service; cruiser's methods; care and use 
of instruments. Lecture, collateral reading and practice work; 
three practicum periods, second and third terms. 

Wood Technology. Wood elements; properties of wood; identi- 
fication of common woods; uses of wood. Text and collateral read- 
ing; three practicum periods, first term. 

Forest Byproducts. Specialized study of forest products other 
than wood; turpentine orcharding; wood distillation; tan bark and 
fication of common woods; uses of wood. Text and collateral read- 
ing; three practicum periods, first term. 

Lumber Accounting. Systems of accounting adapted to the lum- 
ber industry; comparison of systems; determining costs. Lecture 
and collateral reading; three hours, third term. 

Forest Camp 

The summer term of the One-Year Course is conducted in Forest 
Camp, situated in the Blue Ridge Mountains of north Georgia. The 
summer work consists of field work in surveying, mapping and 
timber estimating. Practical experience will be had in specialized 
methods of reconnaissance. 

Within a short distance of the camp large logging and milling 
operations are conducted, in connection with which a portion of the 
field work of the camp is carried on. 

Surrounding the camp is the Georgia National Forest, under the 
supervision of the United States Forest Service. Every facility 
in the study of forest administration is thus offered those students 
who desire to prepare for the position of forest ranger. Forestry 
officials are frequent visitors at Forest Camp, often taking part in 
the regular instruction work. 

The camp equipment consists of tents and buildings, the tents 
being supplied with wood floors, cots and ticks. Bedding must be 
provided by the individual students. The camp library contains 



180 UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

many books on forestry and allied subjects, government and state 
bulletins, and many lumber, forestry and trade journals. 

The students maintain a camp mess, board on the cooperative 
plan costing between two and three dollars a week. 

MASTER OF SCIENCE IN AGRICULTURE 

A graduate course in agriculture is offered leading to the degree 
of Master of Science in Agriculture. A reputable baccalaureate 
degree is a prerequisite. The major and at least one minor must be 
elected from courses offered in the College of Agriculture. One 
minor may be chosen from graduate courses offered in other depart- 
ments of the University. The choice of courses is subject to the 
approval of the professor in charge of the department in which the 
major course is selected. 

Graduate work is offered in five courses by the College of Agri- 
culture, in agronomy, agricultural chemistry, horticulture, animal 
husbandry, veterinary medicine, and forestry. 

In agronomy stress is laid upon soil types of Georgia, improve- 
ment of seed corn, physical properties of soils, fertilizers. 

In agricultural chemistry, special attention is given to agricul- 
tural chemical analysis, with select readings and laboratory work. 

Graduate work in horticulture will be given in advanced pom- 
ology, with select readings upon plant breeding, origin of species, 
etc. 

Animal husbandry graduate work will take up feeding tests with 
study of chemical and physiological changes in animal life. 

Graduate work in veterinary science consists of theory and prac- 
tice of veterinary medicine, clinics, lectures and laboratory work in 
bacteriology. 

Graduate work in agricultural education treats of the various edu- 
cational problems arising in connection with the teaching of voca- 
tional agriculture, and with administering the "National Educational 
Act." 

Graduate work can be taken during the summer as well as dur- 
ing the regular University terms. 

For full particulars about graduate work, the candidate should 
write to College of Agriculture for special bulletin outlining the 
work of the Graduate School. 

MASTER OF FORESTRY 

Graduate courses in forestry are offered leading to the degree of 
Master of Forestry. A reputable baccalaureate degree is a pre- 
requisite. The major and one minor must be elected from technical 
forestry subjects. One minor may be elected from other divisions 
of the College of Agriculture or other departments of the University. 



THE COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 181 

Full particulars as to requirements will be found in the announce- 
ment of the Graduate School, University of Georgia. 

SUMMER COURSES IN AGRICULTURE 

The Georgia State College of Agriculture offers two sets of 
courses during its summer session, the collegiate courses leading 
to degrees, and the Summer School courses designed to equip public 
school teachers for better teaching of agricultural subjects. 

Cost. A tuition fee of $20 for each collegiate course will be 
charged; also a laboratory fee varying with the course, of from $5 
to $10 to cover cost of material. In addition the student will be 
charged for any breakage. 

COLLEGIATE COURSES 

The courses here offered apply toward a degree with credit equal 
to those given during the regular term. 

Not more than one full course can be taken by each student and 
three students will have to apply for any collegiate course offered 
before it is given. 

Cotton Industry 9 and 10. Cotton Grading, warehousing and 
marketing. Experimental cotton breeding. Three hours credit. 
Fee, $5. Professor Rast. 

Agronomy 5 and 6. A study of the origin and physical properties 
of different soil types. Factors in crop production. Methods of 
soil management and studies of commercial fertilizers. Lectures, 
recitations, laboratory work, field excursions and parallel readings. 
Three hours credit. Laboratory fee, $5. Professor Crabb. 

Animal Husbandry 2, 3, 4, and 5. The origin, history and devel- 
opment of the present type of horses, mules, beef cattle, dairy cat- 
tle, sheep and swine are taken up. Three hours credit. Laboratory 
fee, $5. Professor Yaxis. 

Horticulture 1, 2 and 3. Fruit growing, pruning, propagation, 
and truck gardening are included in this course. Three hours credit. 
Laboratory fee, $5. Professor McHatton. 

Agricultural Engineering 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5. Wood and forge work, 
drawing, farm machinery, motors and farm surveying are treated. 
Three hours credit. Laboratory fee, $5. Professor Hart. 

Agricultural Engineering 18: Home Designing. For description 
of course see page 49\ Professor Hart. 

Agricultural Engineering lb to 3b. For students in Agricultural 
Education. For description of course see page 46. Professor Hart. 

Agricultural Engineering 6 and 7. Fencing and farm building. 
Laboratory fee, $5. Professor Hart. 

Veterinary Medicine 3 and 4. This course includes anatomy and 



182 UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

physiology of farm animals and some work in materia medica. 
Three hours credit. Laboratory fee, $5. Dr. Bur son. 

Agricultural Chemistry 2b and 3b. Qualitative and quantitative 
analyses for agricultural students. Qualitative analyses equal to 
that given in college catalogue under "2b" prerequisite for 3b. 
Three hours credit. Laboratory fee, $10. Professors Worsham and 
Carter. 

Poultry Husbandry, Farm Poultry 1. A general course in poul- 
try management, covering breeds and breeding, housing, feeding, 
incubation, brooding and marketing. Breeds best suited to Georgia 
and their requirements will be studied in detail. Poultry problems 
in this state will also be fully discussed. Laboratory work will 
consist of practical work among the flocks on the College poultry 
farm. Five lectures and three laboratories per week. Professor 
Dilts. 

Plant Pathology 6. Plant diseases. Symptoms and control meas- 
ures. Professor Berry. 

Forestry 4a, 7, 12 and 16. Courses in tree identification, timber 
estimating, forest surveying and mapping. (See special description 
of courses). Professor Berry. 

Other courses will be given if the number of students applying 
justify it, and it is found possible to offer them. 

SUMMER SCHOOL COURSES 

(No tuition is charged for these courses). 

Elementary Agriculture. The state text-book will be followed in 
a general way with such references to additional works as may be 
deemed necessary. Especial emphasis will be given to the work 
to be done by the students in the elementary schools. This will 
include simple experiments to be performed at the school, such work 
as can be done at the home of the students, and in the school garden. 
Excursions will be made to different parts of the College farm. The 
various laboratories of the Agricultural College will be utilized in 
studying the various laboratory experiments suggested. 

Home Study: Halligan's "Fundamentals of Agriculture," Call and 
Schafen's "Laboratory Manual of Agriculture." Professor Fain. 

High School Agriculture. Warren's "Elementary Agriculture" 
will be used as a text-book. Especial study will be made of labora- 
tory practice to go with this text. The general scheme for this 
laboratory work will be outlined showing how seasonal work can be 
combined with the text, how the home farms and gardens can be 
used and especial exercises suggested to increase the powers of ob- 
servation in students. Regular excursions over the College farm, 
dairy, etc., will be required. 



THE COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 183 

Home Study: "Soils," by Fletcher; "Field Crops," by Wilson & 
Warburton; "Beginnings in Animal Husbandry," by Plumb; "Fruit 
Growing," by S. B. Greer; "Rural Agriculture," C. W. Davis. Read 
all and pass examination on any two. Professor Fain. 

(Note: For elementary agriculture, see general elementary de- 
partment course). 

Elementary Field Crops. This course is designed to give special 
information on common field crops. A study will be made of their 
classification, uses, relative importance, their growth, and the func- 
tions of seeds, leaves and roots. Attention will be given to the fol- 
lowing crops: Grain crops, including corn, wheat, oats; sorghum, 
etc.; forage crops, grasses, legumes, alfalfa, etc.; miscellaneous 
crops, potatoes, sugar cane, tobacco, etc.; fibre crops, cotton, etc. 
A brief study of weeds will be made, also of crop rotations. Class 
work will include lectures, recitations and laboratory exercises. 
Text: "Field Crops," by Wilson and Warburton; "Field and Lab- 
oratory Studies of Crops," by McCall. Home Study: Duggar's 
"Southern Field Crops." Professor Crabb. 

Elementary Soils and Soil Fertility. This course is designed for 
those who desire special information on soils and soil fertility. The 
work includes a study of soil formation, classification, physical 
properties and composition of soils. Also the study of conditions 
essential for plant growth, plant food elements in the soil and their 
relation to plant growth. The management of different soils for the 
maintenance of their productivity and the use of commercial fertil- 
izers are studied. Class work consists of lectures, recitations, dem- 
onstrations, laboratory experiments and field excursions on the 
Agricultural College farm. Text: "Soils and Soil Fertility," by 
Whitson and Walster; "Field and Laboratory Studies of Soils," by 
McCall. Home Study: Burkett's "Soils." Professor Crabb. 

Animal Husbandry. This course includes a study of the charac- 
teristics and adaptation of the different types of horses, cattle and 
hogs. Some study is also made of the more important breeds of 
each class. The breeding, feeding and management of live stock 
is also taken up in a general way. The laboratory periods are 
given over to judging and comparative study of livestock on the 
College farm, the making of butter, separation of milk and testing 
of milk and its products. 

Manual Training. This course is offered in handling, sharpening 
and use of elementary tools; in use of square, thumb guage, saw, 
chisels and planes; in construction work based on King's "Elements 
of Construction;" wood work, forge work, drawing. Professor Hart. 

Vocational Training Courses in Agricultural Engineering. Special 
variations of Agricultural Engineering lb to 7b to help teachers in 



184 UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

their next session's work. No college credit can be given for these 
courses. Professor Hart. 

Landscape Gardening and Floriculture. This course will be 
Adapted to teachers of high schools and upper grammar grades. It 
includes a discussion of the fundamental principles of landscape 
gardening, and a study of the plants used to obtain the desired ef- 
fects. The handling, growing and propagation of flowers and other 
ornamental plants receive attention. Special emphasis is placed upon 
school and home ground improvement, both in the country and in 
the city. Regular excursions to the various points of landscape 
and floricultural interest in and about the city of Athens. Text: 
"The Manual of Gardening," by L. H. Bailey. Other references: 
"Landscape Gardening," by Waugh; "Landscape Gardening," by 
Maynard; "Kemp's Landscape Gardening," by Waugh; "Principles 
of Floriculture," by White. Home study required. 

Horticulture 18. A course in plant propagation, dealing with sex- 
ual and asexual methods, special attention being given to methods 
used in presenting such problems in secondary agricultural work. 
The latter part of the course to deal with vegetable gardening with 
emphasis upon secondary agricultural work. This course covers 
the essentials of the last half of Horticulture 2 and all of Horticul- 
ture 3. One lecture and one laboratory a day for five weeks. Of- 
fered to Vocational Agricultural students in Summer School. Uni- 
versity credit, one and one-half hours. Professor MeEatton. 

Horticulture 19. A course in fruit growing and pruning, offered 
alternately with Horticulture 18. A systematic discussion of the 
problems of orcharding in the south with references to other sec- 
tions. As much time as possible will be given to historical horticul- 
ture as an aid to teaching secondary horticulture. Practical work 
In pruning and orchard management will be required. This course 
covers the essentials of Horticulture 1 and the first half of Horticul- 
ture 2. One lecture and one laboratory period a day for five weeks. 
University credit, one and one-half hours. Offered to Vocational 
Agricultural students in Summer School, 19 20. Professor McHatton. 

Cotton Industry 9. Summer Cotton Grading School includes a 
thorough study of the different grades and types of cotton bought 
and sold in Georgia as compared with the official grades prepared 
by the U. S. Bureau of Standards. Hundreds of different samples 
are handled and studied each afternoon for five consecutive weeks. 

Modern warehouse construction, cotton insurance, buying and 
selling on both spot and future markets with the necessary book- 
keeping connected is given sufficient consideration to enable the 
student with little additional experience to take charge of a ware- 
house and buy and sell cotton in open market. 

Each student who satisfactorily completes the course will be given 



THE COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 185 

a certificate of efficiency. When proper entrance requirements are 
met, students will be given one and one-half hours college credit. 
Professor Rast. 

This course may be taken separately or in connection with Cotton 
Industry 10. 

Cotton Industry 10. One conference each day reporting reviews 
of cotton breeding literature and details of experimental work in 
progress with cotton. One two-hour laboratory period each day, 
making cotton hybrids and studying Fl, F2, and F3 hybrids pre- 
viously made is also required. A study of oil content in seed from 
different varieties and strains will be made with a view of increas- 
ing this constituent by selection. 

This course is especially designed for students who specialize in 
Cotton Industry. Courses 4 and 5 are prerequisite, and it should 
be taken in connection with Cotton Industry 9. The two taken to- 
gether constitute three hours college credit. Professor Rast. 

FOREST RANGER SCHOOL. 
Forest Camp, June 21 to August 15 

The Ranger School is created to supply a demand for a short 
course of training in practical forest engineering, but does not pre- 
pare for a position in professional forestry. The object of the 
work is to make a man, already acquainted with woods work, more 
efficient in his labor. The school is open to men already in the for- 
est service, woodsmen who desire to prepare for the ranger exam- 
ination, and lumbermen who desire technical training in timber 
cruising and surveying. 

A number of textbooks will be required in connection with the 
various courses of study but these may be purchased through the 
school if the order is placed early. The camp library will contain 
a good assortment of forest literature and all the important lumber 
trade and forest journals. The school day will consist of eight hours 
— 8 to 12 o'clock a. m., and 1:30 to 5:30 p. m., with the exception 
of Wednesday afternoon and Sunday. Work will be arranged for 
every day of the week. 

Expenses. _In addition to the regular tuition of $10, there is a 
laboratory fee of $10 to cover cost of equipment. Board may be 
had at the camp mess at a very reasonable figure. The mess will 
"be conducted upon a cooperative basis and the indications are that 
the charge will not be more than $4 per week. 

Admission and Credit. The camp is open to men of good char- 
acter who have attained an age of 18 years and have completed 
their grammar school work. Upon completion of the course of study 
there will be held a "model" ranger examination, successful com- 
petition in which entitles a man to a certificate from the school. 



186 UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

To those men possessing the necessary qualifications, who desire to 
matriculate in the Forest School, credit will be given for the fresh- 
man summer camp. 

Course of Study 

Dendrology. The identification of trees and shrubs, native and in- 
troduced, common to Georgia and the south. Special stress placed 
upon characteristics present only in cut logs. Herbarium required 
from each student. 

Surveying. Use of box compass in running lines, pacing, location, 
platting notes, mapping, methods of survey, resurvey, marking cor- 
ners. Text: Carey's "Handbook for Northern Woodsmen." 

Mensuration. Units of measurement, log rules, estimating tim- 
ber, use of volume tables, methods of reconnaissance. Text: Graves* 
"Forest Mensuration." 

Lumbering. Study of woods operations, tools used and organiza- 
tion of work, methods of transport, milling. Scientific management 
of woods operations. Note-book and report. 

Special Lectures. As opportunity offers, arrangements will be 
made for address upon pertinent subjects by Forest Service officials, 
prominent lumbermen and visiting teachers. Experts in various 
lines will discuss fire protection, forest tenancy, grazing in the for- 
est, reconnaissance work, camping and woodcraft. 

In order to make proper arrangements it will be neccessary that 
all applications, be in the hands of the director not latter than May 
15th. 

WODCRAFT SCHOOL 
Forest Camp, July 5 to August 15 

There is a growing tendency to introduce nature study, forestry 
and agriculture in the secondary schools of the state. The Nature 
Study School is created to supply this demand. This school is open 
to teachers and prosepective teachers of both sexes and to mature 
men and women who desire a general knowledge of the woods and 
fields. Every facility will be offered those desiring to collect mate- 
rial for class room demonstration. 

For further information refer to announcement of this school. 



THE COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 187 

BOYS' AND GIRLS' SHORT COURSES 

To meet the requirements of the boys and girls who have won 
short course scholarships in corn, canning, pig and poultry club 
work, special summer courses have been arranged. The instruction 
is elementary, practical and visualized as far as possible by applica- 
tion or illustration. These courses are offered for August 8-16. 

FOR CORX AXD PIG CLUB BOYS 

Soils and Fertilizers. Five lectures. A careful study of nitrogen, 
phosphoric acid, and potash, the sources from which we can get 
these and their function in plant development. Home mixing of 
fertilizers will be stressed and the boy will be shown how to do 
this work accurately. A detailed study will be given of the most 
general types of soil found in Georgia, to what crops they are best 
adapted, and how best to handle them to get maximum yields. 

Rotation of Crops. Five lectures. A simple study of the best 
methods of crops rotation and the effects on increased production. 
Special stress will be laid on winter cover crops and on all forms of 
useful legumes. 

Seed Selection. Five lectures. How the boys may improve the 
producing power of plants by selecting seed from the field. How 
to grow improved varieties of seed and how to care for same. Cereal 
judging will be stressed and the boys will be required to do a con- 
siderable amount of this work in the laboratory. 

Live Stock. Five lectures. The boys will be required to study 
closely the work being done at the College in regard to dairying, 
beef production, hog raising, and horse breeding. Inspection of 
each of these will be made by the boys with the professor in charge, 
and they will be required to judge according to score card after 
being given the lecture. 

Farm Machinery. A careful study of all forms of improved farm 
machinery will be provided and the boys will be required to handle 
same. 

Farm Poultry. The poultry course for boys is designed to give 
them practical knowledge of chicken raising on the farm. Incuba- 
tion, care of chicks, feeding, housing and marketing will be among 
the subjects discussed. Two hours each day will be given to this 
work and the course will be made as practicable as possible. The 
boys who complete this course should be able to handle and care 
for a good sized flock of chickens. Laboratory work will consist 
of inspection trips to model poultry farms, operation of incubators, 
killing and dressing poultry for market. 

Field Observation. The boys will be taken in charge and shown 
the farm building, farm equipment and work being done on the 



188 UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

College farm. Special stress will be laid on the test plat and the 
alfalfa fields. 

Daily Record and Booklets. The boys will be required to write 
an attractive story of how they grew their acres of corn in 1918. 
These will be put out in booklet form. An outline for the story and 
helpful suggestions will be given. 

Anatomy and Physiology. A series of five lectures, given in sim- 
ple language, including studies of the blood, circulation, foods, di- 
gestion, and suggestions for the care and handling of farm animals. 

Home Gardening. Five lectures. This course of lectures will 
take up the fundamental principles of gardening, discussing soils, 
fertilization, handling of plants, varieties and cultural methods, par- 
ticularly adapted to the home garden. 

Home Orchard. Five lectures. This course will consist of a gen- 
eral discussion of fruits and varieties, soils and fertilizers as well 
as cultural methods required. Special attention will be given to the 
home fruit acre. 

FOR CANNING AND POULTRY CLUB GIRLS. 

Practical Farm Poultry. The poultry course for girls is designed 
to give them a practical knowledge of chicken raising on the farm. 
Two hours each day will be spent in this work. A series of short 
lectures will be given which cover the most important points in 
feeding, incubating and brooding, housing, caring for and market- 
ing the eggs, killing and dressing fowls and in preventing disease 
in the flock. Following the lecture the girls will take laboratory 
work or will be taken out into the poultry yards where they will be 
given a chance to become familiar with the different varieties of 
chickens common in Georgia, and learn the methods of poultry 
raising practiced at the College poultry yards. The girls will be 
expected to set up and start an incubator and brooder, assist in 
killing and dressing fowls for cooking, make lice powder, test eggs 
and do other practical work. 

After completing this course a girl should be able to take up 
poultry work at home with increased interest, and make it pay. 

Home Vegetable Gardening. This course is designed to teach the 
fundamental principles of vegetable gardening by going into a dis- 
cussion of the following: varieties, plant propagation, soil fertil- 
izing, soil preparation, transplanting of certain varieties, summer 
and winter cultural methods, the use of garden implements, fighting 
insects and preventing disease. 

Ten lectures are given in this course. One entire lecture is de- 
voted to the tomato, since this vegetable has aroused a great deal 
of interest with the advent of the girls' canning clubs. The remain- 



THE COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 189 

ing lectures are upon groups of vegetables, and are so given as to 
teach principles rather than routine of gardening. 

Cooking and Food Study. Ten two-hour periods are devoted to 
cooking, the work being planned with the two-fold object of teach- 
ing some fundamental principles of cookery and giving the student 
skill in the preparation of wholesome dishes. The lessons will in- 
clude cooking green vegetables, starchy vegetables, making cream 
soups, making muffins, biscuit, light-bread, sandwiches and coffee; 
cooking cereals and meat stew in a fireless cooker, and preparing 
the chickens dressed in the poultry class for table. A number of 
periods will be given to the study of foods. The classes of food 
and their function in nutrition will be taught by experiments, use 
of charts and lecture. The selection of foods for a healthy diet 
will be considered in a brief but practical way. 

Rural Home Conveniences. A practical course illustrated by pic- 
tures, charts, and the articles themselves whenever possible. Th© 
course will develop a knowledge of conveniences leading to sanitary 
conditions in the farm home and to economy of time and energy 
on the part of farm girls and women. It will demonstrate how such 
conveniences may be introduced into all the homes at a minimum 
cost; how many simple home-made inventions may be substituted 
for the much more costly commercial outfits. 

The following subjects will be included: Water-works systems; 
lighting systems; labor saving conveniences in the kitchen; cement 
walks; screens in doors and windows. 

Farm Dairying. A practical course in Farm Dairying, covering 
five periods, two hours each, will be given as follows: 

1. Milk; composition and treatment for household use. 

2. Cream; its separation from milk and treatment for butter 
making. 

3. Butter; how to make it of the best quality and secure the 
greatest yield at the least expenditure of labor and for equipment. 

4. Dairy Products; scoring and marketing. 

5. Testing milk and its products for fat, acidity and quality. 
Home Orchards. This course consists of a general discussion of 

fruits and varieties, soils and fertilizers as well as cultural methods 
required. Special attention is given to the home fruit acre. 



190 UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

THREE MONTHS OR WINTER COURSE 
IN AGRICULTURE 

Short courses of instruction in agriculture and related subjects 
are offered for the benefit of those who are engaged or expect to 
engage in farming, and yet who are so situated that they cannot 
undertake a full college course of study. This course is given dur- 
ing the winter when work is least pressing and the time can best 
be spared. The course consists principally of the regular work 
provided during the winter term of the one-year course, with such 
additional elective subjects as the student finds he can conveniently 
carry after consulting the president of the College. 



SHORT COURSE FOR FARMERS AND FARM 

WOMEN 

A ten days' Short Course will be given for farmers and farm 
women beginning January 5, 1920. No entrance requirements are 
specified and there is no tuition or fees except $1 for a registration 
fee. The course is open to all farmers and farm women. 

The object of the course is to present essential facts in a practical 
way on timely agricultural subjects. No work is given that does 
not find practical application in the every-day work of the farm. 
For the men there will be courses in farm management under boll 
weevil conditions; livestock and feeding; swine production; cereals 
and legumes; plant diseases and insects; orchard management; 
farm machinery and engineering and woodland management. For 
the women courses will be offered in food conservation; study of 
food values; cookery of foods; household management; dairy hus- 
bandry; gardening and fruits; poultry husbandry and floriculture. 

The lectures offered in the several short courses are summarized 
and presented to the student on mimeographed paper which he may 
file and keep for future reference. When the course is over each 
student has fifty lecture sheets comprising a ready reference book 
on the subjects which he has studied. 

AGRONOMY (Short Course) 

Cereal Production. Five lectures. Various cereals will undoubt- 
edly be substituted for cotton in a large part of the state within the 
next few years. The College has secured a considerable amount of 
data relative to the different cereals that will be presented in these 
lectures. Improved home grown seeds are the best that can be ob- 
tained, and especial attention will be given to methods of selection 
in improving the cereals. Professor Childs. 



THE COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 191 

Cereal Judging. Five demonstrations. Fifteen varieties of wheat, 
thirteen varieties of oats, fifteen varieties of barley, and three varie- 
ties of rye have been grown at the College for the past season. The 
student will be given a chance to become familiar with these differ- 
ent sorts. The qualities of each as adapted to grazing, hay produc- 
tion, or grain will be studied. This will be helpful not only from the 
standpoint of securing the sorts best adapted to different conditions 
in the state but also in avoiding undesirable sorts. Professor Childs. 

Legumes. Ten lectures. Considerable interest is being mani- 
fested in the velvet bean, especially the early sorts, also in soy beans 
and peanuts. A discussion of the use of these will be given, with 
especial reference to their adaptation to different sections of the 
state. The College has been growing a number of varieties, and 
yields both of grain and hay in many instances can be given. Special 
attention will be paid to the soil requirements, fertilization and 
inoculation. The winter growing legumes will be discussed as well 
as those that are grown in the summer. Professor Fain. 

Demonstration of Legumes. Five periods. Much interest is being 
manifested in early velvet beans and a great deal of confusion exists 
in regard to \arieties. These demonstrations will afford an oppor- 
tunity to become familiar with the different sorts, both in the pod 
and threshed. The soy bean has a very wide range in the state. 
There is quite a difference in varieties and the College has a suffi- 
cient number of these on hand both in press specimens and grain to 
give a clear idea of the character of each of the varieties grown. 
Inoculation methods will also be studied. Professor Fain. 

Farm Management for Boll Weevil Conditions. Ten lectures. It 
will be necessary to reorganize many farms in the state on account of 
changing conditions. Others should be reorganized because they are 
not paying. This course of lectures will consider the principles un- 
derlying the best organization of the farm with especial reference 
to the peculiar needs in this state. A number of records of success- 
ful farms in this state have been secured. These will be presented 
as examples. These farms will be able to withstand such adversi- 
ties as the boll weevil because they are based on the right principle. 
In producing new crops, new markets will have to be sought. Mar- 
keting farm products will be given special attention. Professor Fain. 

Farm Management Demonstration. Ten periods. Records of a 
number of farms will be taken and the income for each worked out. 
By using the blanks that can be furnished by the College, each mem- 
ber of the class will be able to ascertain definitely each year how 
the farm business has prospered. Professor Starr. 

Soils and Crops. Ten lectures. Natural adaptations of soils to 
certain crops and cropping systems has led to a definite knowledge 
of the character of soils. The make-up of the general soils of Geor- 



192 UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

gia will be considered including their origin, physical properties and 
plant food content. How to manage these soils to increase their 
crop-producing power will be studied. The moisture supply and 
control will receive attention as well as those practices that con- 
serve plant food. Organic matter is one of the most needed sub- 
stances in Georgia soils, and special attention will be given to its 
uses and values as well as means for supplying it. Lime will be 
considered in its relation to improving the soil. Professor Crabb. 

Farm Drainage. Five lectures. History and development of farm 
drainage. A discussion of kinds of soil in the state requiring drain- 
age and effect of proper drainage. Drainage of small tracts by open 
ditches, by tile, cost and comparative merits of each. Tile drainage 
as an aid to terracing hillsides and rolling areas will be discussed 
and illustrated. Drainage problems peculiar to each section of the 
state will be studied and successful solutions evolved. The state 
drainage law will be analyzed. Cooperative district drainage will 
be explained. J. V. Phillips, Senior Drainage Engineer. 

Demonstration of Tile Laying. Five Periods. The use of agricul- 
tural tile is rather new in this state, and for this reason the demon- 
stration of the various processes, such as staking out a ditch, open- 
ing it up, bringing the bottom to grade, placing and bedding tile, 
will be given. The value of the drain tile depends a good deal on 
how it is put down, and since there are only a few expert tile layers 
in the state, this phase of the work will be stressed. Open ditches 
and general drainage system will also be given attention. J. V. 
Phillips, Senior Drainage Engineer. 

Fertilizers. Ten lectures on fertilizers. A careful study will be 
made of the effect of various mineral elements in the soil on plant 
growth; the best means of supplying those in which the soil is most 
likely to be deficient; the sources of nitrogen, phosphoric acid and 
potash, and methods of purchasing, mixing and applying these va- 
rious constituents to the soil for the purpose of producing maximum 
crops. Liming soils, crop rotations and their relation to maintain- 
ing the plant food supply will be discussed. Professor Crabb. 

The Cotton Plant. Five lectures. These will deal with a brief 
history of the cotton plant, and the classification of cotton according 
to varieties. As much time as possible will be spent in the study 
of individual plants, including methods of selection for improve- 
ment, such as increasing the earliness in order that profitable crops 
may be made under boll weevil conditions. Records of plants from 
the breeding plots in the demonstration field form excellent material 
for graphic illustrations of the principles involved. Some of these 
lectures will also be illustrated by stereopticon to show damage 
done to different types of plants by the boll weevil. Professor Rast. 

Cotton Cultivation. Five lectures. These lectures will include the 



THE COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 193 

preparation of land; the best methods and time to apply fertilizers; 
details of preparation immediately before planting; how and when 
the cultivation of young plants should be begun, and the kind of 
implements best suited to these purposes. All of these lectures are 
to include discussions of the best practical methods of producing 
maximum yields of cotton under boll weevil infestation. Professor 
Rasl. 

Cotton Grading. Ten demonstrations. In this course the student 
will have an opportunity to handle and grade samples of cotton each 
day. Professor Past. 

ANIMAL HUSBANDRY (Short course) 

Feeds and Feeding. Ten lectures on Feeds and Feeding. This 
course reviews the sources of feeding stuffs available for livestock, 
special emphasis being laid on the value of cotton seed and its by- 
products. Other materials produced in the state which can be util- 
ized to advantage are discussed. The gross anatomy, the physiology 
of the digestive organs, and the preparing and compounding of bal- 
anced rations for maintenance, milk and butter production, and for 
fattening and growth will be given consideration. Professor Martini. 

Breeds and Breeding. _Ten lectures. In this course the origin, 
history and development of the various breeds of horses, cattle, 
sheep and swine adapted to Georgia will be considered. Methods of 
introducing improved animals will be discussed, and attention will 
be given to the subject of animal breeding which will include a 
consideration of selection, heredity and the other fundamental laws 
of animal reproduction. Professor Jamagin. 

Stock Judging. Five periods. The score card is used to famil- 
iarize the students with the important points of the different classes 
of livestock. With the records of production of the dairy herds, the 
correlation between form and function can be clearly demonstrated. 
The stock judging work includes horses, hogs, dairy and beef cattle. 
Professors Jamagin and Yaxis. 

Beef Production. Five lectures. This work is especially designed 
for farmers who contemplate the establishment of beef herds. It 
includes a discussion of the breeds of beef cattle adapted to this sec- 
tion, the methods of breeding, feeding and management, and a dis- 
cussion of the available markets. Professor Jamagin. 

Swine Production. Five lectures. This course will include the 
selection of breeds, grazing and feed crops, methods of breeding, 
feeding and handling and construction of the necessary hog houses, 
fences and equipment. Professor Yaxis. 

Dairying. _Five lectures. This course is designed to give practical 
assistance to dairymen. The founding of a herd, its feed and man- 
agement, crops to be grown, pasture improvement and the different 



194 UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

methods of marketing the product with the advantages and dis- 
advantages of each system, will be considered. The breeds of dairy 
cattle and the construction of barns and silos will be discussed. 
The business of dairying, to give more dollars to the man who 
milks, will be stressed. Professor Taxis. 

Dairy Demonstrations. Five practice periods. Practice in judg- 
ing dairy cattle, separating cream, testing milk and cream for butter- 
fat and buttermaking will be given. Special emphasis will be given 
to the production and care of cream and the proper sterilization of 
dairy utensils. Home made, inexpensive dairy equipment will be 
studied. Professor Taxis. 

HORTICULTURE (Short course) 

Tracking. Five lectures. This course includes discussions of soils, 
cultivation, fertilization, harvesting, marketing and other trucking 
problems. Professor R. E. Blackburn. 

Orchard Management. Ten lectures. These will include discus- 
sions of location, choice of plants, planting, tillage, cover crops, fer- 
tilization, pruning, thinning, frost, spraying, picking, packing, and 
selling. Professors McHatton and R. E. Blackburn. 

Spraying and Pruning. Ten demonstrations, consisting of practice 
in mixing and applying sprays to orchard and garden, pruning trees, 
etc. Professors McHatton and R. E. Blackburn. 

ENTOMOLOGY 

Cotton Insects. Five lectures on the insects injurious to cotton: 
a discussion of their life histories and the means of control. Pro- 
fessor McHatton. 

Grain and Farm Insects. Five lectures on the insects injurious to 
grain and general farm crops with a discussion of their life histories 
and means of control. Professor McHatton. 

Fruit Insects. Five lectures on insects injurious to fruits and 
orchards. Life histories are discussed and means of control out- 
lined. Professor McHatton. 

VETERINARY WORK (Short course) 

Contagious Diseases. Ten lectures. This course will take into 
consideration the contagious diseases of farm animals which are of 
most importance to the Georgia farmer. Measures of prevention, 
eradication, control and treatment will be given. Dr. Burson. 

Veterinary Clinic. Five periods. Clinics or demonstrations will 
be conducted at the Veterinary Hospital in connection with the 
work on contagious diseases and other diseases. Dr. Burson. 

FORESTRY (Short course) 
Wood and Its Uses. Ten laboratory periods. Identification of 



THE COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 195 

common woods; adaptation to specific uses; uses of woods. Professor 
Berry. 

Woodland Management. Ten lectures. Thinnings and improve- 
ment cuttings, reproduction, protection. Professor Zimm. 

Wood Measurements. Ten lectures and practicums. Units of 
measurement; estimating standing timber; log rules. Professor 
Zimm. 

Preservative Treatment of Farm Timbers. Use of creosote and 
*ther preservatives in prolonging the life of fence posts, shingles, 
and all woods subject to rotting. Professor Zimm. 

Marketing Farm W T oodland Products. Five lectures. Rough 
methods of estimating timber; wood measurements; log grading; 
specifications; markets. Professors Berry and Zimm. 

PLANT PATHOLOGY (Short course) 

Disease of Horticultural Crops. Ten lectures. Identification of 
common fruit diseases of orchard and garden. Preventative and con- 
trol measure. Professor Berry. 

Diseases of Cotton, Sweet Potato and Truck Crops. Ten lectures. 
Characteristic appearance of common diseases; preventative and con- 
trol measures. Professor Berry. 

Diseases of Cereal Crops. Five lectures. Common diseases which 
may be prevented or controlled; selection of seed grain; control of 
smut; storage and handling; seeding; legislation. Professor Berry. 

Plant Diseases. Five laboratory periods. Causes; favorable con- 
ditions; action of disease organism; methods of prevention and con- 
trol. Professor Berry. 

POULTRY HUSBANDRY (Short course) 

Poultry Breeds and Breeding. Five lectures. These lectures will 
be studies of the different breeds and varieties best suited to farm 
conditions; the selection, housing and mating of the breeding stock, 
and culling out poor producers. Professor Dilts. 

Incubation and Brooding. Five lectures. Natural and artificial 
incubation and brooding will be considered. Professor Dilts. 

Poultry Breeding. Five lectures. A study of the different kinds 
of feed required for growth, producing eggs, or conditioning birds 
for market. Professor Dilts. 

Practice Periods. In addition to the above lectures, several prac- 
tice periods will be given on Poultry House Construction, Selecting 
Breeders and High Producers, Operating Incubators, Candling, Grad- 
ing, and Packing Eggs, Killing and Dressing Fowls for Market and 
any other practical work that is desired. Professor Dilts. 



196 UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

HOME ECONOMICS (Short course) 

Food Study. Ten lectures. These will consist of a study of food 
habits and dietary standards together with work on the fuel values 
of different foods. Especial attention will be given to the use and 
preparation of substitute foods. This course is designed to help in 
carrying out the plans of the food administration. Miss Dowdle. 

Cooking. Ten periods. This course will include home canning 
of fruits and vegetables; the cookery of vegetables, soups, breads, 
eggs and meats; a study of food principles, comparative food values, 
the relative cost of foods, and combinations of foods in a healthful 
diet. The feeding of growing children, and menus for school lunches 
will be emphasized. Opportunity will be given for laboratory prac- 
tice. Mrs. Wood. 

Home Vegetable Gardening. Ten lectures. These lectures will 
deal with a brief outline of the types of soil, soil preparation, soil 
cultivation, planting of seeds, handling and setting plants, garden 
insects and diseases and their control, and the cultivation of summer 
and winter varieties of vegetables adapted to Georgia. Professor 
Harvey. 

Dairying. Five lectures. In this course, the care and handling 
of milk and its products in the home will be stressed. Different 
methods of marketing the products, advantages and disadvantages 
of each system, the manufacture and marketing of butter and cot- 
tage cheese and the proper handling until marketed will be treated. 
Various methods of cream separation will be considered, also the 
testing of milk and cream for butterfat. Professor Taxis. 

Dairying. Five practice periods. This will consist of practical 
work designed to follow up the lectures. Practice will be given in 
churning, printing and packing butter, the testing of milk and cream, 
cheese making and the use of the cream separator. Professor Taxis. 

Poultry Raising. Ten lectures on Breeds and Breeding. The 
course will consist of a study of the different breeds and varieties 
best suited to farm conditions; the selection, housing, and mating 
of the breeding stock, and culling out poor producers. A study of 
the different kinds of feed required for growth, egg production, and 
fattening for market. Professor Dilts. 

Practice Periods. In addition to the lectures, practice period* 
will be given on Poultry House Construction; Selecting Breeders and 
High Producers; Operating Incubators; Candling, Grading, and 
Packing Eggs, and Killing and Dressing Fowls for Market. Pro- 
fessor Dilts. 

AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING (Short course) 

Farm Machinery: Preparation Machinery. With various types of 
machines for illustrations, discussions will be given concerning me- 



THE COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 19 7 

chanical principles, adaptations to varying conditions of soils of 
Georgia, labor-saving and general efficiency of plows, manure spread- 
ers, lime distributors, narrows, rollers and planks. Professor Hart. 

Seeding Machinery. A consideration will be given drills, single 
and double row cotton planters with complete analysis of mechan- 
ical arrangements and requirements. Professor Welch. 

Harvesting Machinery. Mowers, rakes, binders, corn binders and 
corn sledge will be discussed relative to their mechanical require- 
ments for efficiency, careful investigations being made of the parts 
of each machine. Professor Welch. 

Storing Machinery. Threshing machines, silage cutters, huskers, 
shredders, hay balers, etc., will be considered with reference to the 
mechanical principles involved and the proper handling for greatest 
efficiency. Professor Hart. 

Farm Motors. Five lectures will be given on gasoline, kerosene, 
and stationary and traction engines, the various types of engines 
being used for illustrating the discussions. Professor Hart. 



EXTENSION DIVISION 

It is the purpose of the College of Agriculture to aid all educa- 
tional activities which are being carried on in the state. The ful- 
fillment of this purpose is one of its greatest obligations to the 
state and every effort will be made to further the work of extension 
teaching. Two great ends are to be subserved by work of this 
character. First, the systematizing of the educational activities of 
the state and the raising of these to a higher level of efficiency. 
Second, the dissemination of useful knowledge which has accumu- 
lated in recent years, but is not generally appreciated as it should 
be, and which cannot be brought to the attention of adults and 
those remotely situated from the college save through extension 
agencies. 

SMITH-LEVER ACTIVITIES 

Recognizing the importance of this character of work, the General 
Assembly of Georgia during the annual session of 1915, re-appro- 
priated $40,000 to the State College of Agriculture to be used for 
extension teaching, and in addition thereto made an appropriation 
of $46,150 to offset the appropriation of $56,150 for the year 1916 
made by the federal government under the Smith-Lever Act of May 
8, 1914. Under the same act of congress an increased amount be- 
comes available for extension teaching and farm demonstration work, 
year by year, providing the state appropriates an equal amount. 

During the year 1918-19, because of the great world food short- 
age, Congress appropriated emergency food production work funds 



19 8 UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

for the employment of county agents in nearly all counties in the 
state of Georgia and home demonstration and urban workers for 
most of Georgia. 

In accordance with this action of the state legislature and the 
federal government, the board of trustees has organized the work 
of the several departments constituting the College, so that they 
can carry on their proper share of extension work. Through the 
extension division, the extension schools, special demonstrations, 
boys' and girls' clubs, home economics, farmers' meetings and mis- 
cellaneous conferences are organized and directed. 

Every member of the College staff gives some of his time and 
effort to extension activities. 

AGRONOMY 

The division of agronomy is utilizing a series of test plats on 
different types of soils of the state to secure data concerning their 
principal defects, and what forms of fertilization and crop rotation 
are best adapted to build them up. This department maintains a 
twenty-four acre field for the purpose of carrying on investigations 
relative to corn and cotton breeding, crop rotations, fertilizers and 
eoil management. This information is invaluable to the people of 
the state and is distributed in bulletin form at the meetings held by 
the extension service. 

The traveling field representatives of the division of agronomy 
are also engaged in advising the farmers relative to the improve- 
ment of certain strains of cereals, corn and cotton which are being 
developed through seed selection and hybridization. 

During the year 1918 there have been added to the extension force 
in agronomy, a tobacco specialist, cotton specialist, farm manage- 
ment specialist and a drainage engineer. 

AGRICULTURAL CHEMISTRY 

The division of agricultural chemistry has undertaken a physi- 
cal survey of several counties and is making analyses of all the type 
eoils found therein. A close cooperation of necessity exists between 
the departments of agronomy and agricultural chemistry in this 
work, which is one of the most fundamental character, since it means 
ascertaining the soil deficiencies and determining the methods by 
which these can be supplied. Several men are employed by this 
division. 

ANIMAL HUSBANDRY 

The division of animal husbandry is actively engaged in a num- 
ber of extension problems. Five specialists in live stock are de- 
voting all of their time to field work. In so far as possible, these 
men work through the county agent, thus multiplying their el- 



THE COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 199 

ficiency materially. Since there is no adequate supply of foundation 
breeding stock, one of the first problems has been to buy registered 
animals for the farmers. In this way much better individuals have 
been secured for the same price than could have been gotten by in- 
dividual purchase. County live stock associations have been or- 
ganized, and in so far as possible an attempt has been made to have 
all the farmers in a community adopt one breed. Advice has been 
given as to the laying out and equipping of stock farms for the mo3t 
efficient and economical operation. A very important part of the 
work ha-s been the construction of silos. Swine demonstrations were 
carried on with 65 farmers in southwest Georgia during the past 
year. 

During 1918-19 three new specialists were added to the live stock 
extension work, one in cottage cheese and butter making, one in 
cream cheese and one in sheep husbandry. Cheese factories are being 
promoted in the mountainous section of the state. The factory at 
Young Harris has made a success and won medals at the National 
Dairy Show. A number of cheese factories are in process of con- 
struction. 

The organization of boys' and girls' sheep clubs and the develop- 
ment of the sheep industry in the state of Georgia is a new feature 
of the work. 

Steer feeding demonstrations have been conducted on a number 
of farms. Calf clubs have been organized for the purpose of produc- 
ing baby beef. Considerable assistance has been rendered the live- 
stock departments of many of the county and state fairs. 

On the College farm more than 200 head of live stock are main- 
tained for the purpose of securing data to be distributed in bulletin 
form for use in extension schools and agricultural meetings. 

Two instructors in poultry husbandry have charge of this special 
line of work and they are prepared to advise with all interested 
in this important industry. These men are organizing and develop- 
ing the poultry club work in various counties of the state. 

HORTICULTURE 

The division of horticulture is carrying on extension work in 
connection with the peach, apple, pecan and trucking industries. 
Demonstrations in spraying, pruning and orchard heating and other 
practical problems are given. This department is also supervising 
the work of the county demonstration agents in developing the 
trucking industry in a number of north and south Georgia counties. 

The work of the horticultural division has expanded and recently 
work has been done in home gardens, home orchards, melons and 
truck crops. A bee-keeping specialist has also been added and the 
bee-keeping industry is receiving much encouragement. 



200 UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

AGRICULTURAL. ENGINEERING 

The department of agricultural engineering assists farmers in the 
preparation of plans for farm houses, barns and other outbuildings 
necessary on an up-to-date farm. 

COTTON INDUSTRY 

The division of cotton industry is distributing seed of a selected 
variety which is proving highly resistant to anthracnose, and is en- 
gaged in investigating many vital problems associated with the more 
economic production of cotton in the state. 

VETERINARY MEDICINE 

The division of veterinary medicine is manufacturing hog cholera 
serum. It is also teaching farmers the methods of inoculating hogs 
with the serum and aids county agents and owners of hogs in con- 
trolling hog cholera by the use of serum and sanitary measures. 
It is possible through the use of serum to largely control the de- 
struction wrought by hog cholera. Its importance, therefore, needs 
no further emphasis. This department is also cooperating in every 
possible way with those agencies which are endeavoring to eradicate 
the cattle tick, and to control many diseases which cause serious 
loss to Georgia farmers. 

FORESTRY 

In connection with the division of forestry there has been appoint- 
ed an extension forester who will devote his entire time to demon- 
strations in farm woodland management, the preservative treatment 
of farm timbers to prolong life and the utilization of wornout and 
eroded lands. The acute shortage of fence post material necessitates 
the adoption of some kind of treatment for perishable woods which 
will permit the substitution of sap pine for posts of durable woods 
such as locust, mulberry and "fat" pine. Advice and assistance is 
given in the thinning and improvement of farm woodlands and in 
the regeneration of old, depleted farm forests. 

PLANT PATHOLOGY 

There has been added to the field force of the College an exten- 
sion nJant pathologist. During the past season this specialist has 
devoted his time to the control of plant diseases in the home garden 
and to the prevention of sweet potato diseases, both in field and in 
storage. Large quantities of "wilt resistant" Norton tomato seed 
were distributed to the agents. In many cases the tomato crop 
would have been a failure except for the use of the Norton strain. 
During the present season this work will be increased. Numerous 
demonstrations in the selection and treatment of potato stock, both 
Irish and sweet, were held during the past season. This line of en- 



THE COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 201 

deavor will also be augmented in the future. In general the exten- 
sion plant pathologist will confine his endeavors to field demonstra- 
tions in plant disease control and prevention and to the suppression 
of diseases epidemic in nature. 

PUBLICATIONS 

Through the publication service of the College and particularly- 
through the use of newspaper plate in the weekly papers, the Col- 
lege is reaching a majority of the reading farmers of the state on 
an average of once a week during the scholastic year, with informa- 
tion considered vital to the welfare of Georgia agriculture. The 
daily papers and the agricultural journals are also used, all such 
publications in the state evidencing a desire for cooperation in this 
form of extension service of the College. 

Bulletins and circulars are now being issued by the Extension 
Division and in accord with the Smith-Lever bill under which the 
franking privilege is enjoyed, but all such bulletins and circulars 
are considered and numbered as of the series issued by the College. 
In other words, they are not separate publications and should be 
looked for in the College serials. 

BOYS' AND GIRLS' CLUBS 

Another feature emphasized by the extension division is the 
organization of boys' and girls' industrial clubs. The boys are en- 
couraged to grow corn and raise pigs and calves under specific rules 
and regulations laid down by the College, and the girls to organize 
canning and poultry clubs and to take a greater interest in cooking 
and sewing. In this work the extension division has had the sympa- 
thetic cooperation of the great majority of the county school com- 
missioners, the state department of agriculture, state and local edu- 
cational institutions, business enterprises and a great number of 
interested individuals. Liberal prizes have been offered by a number 
of organizations and individuals. Through the organization of these 
clubs the attention of the boys and girls is being directed to a more 
thorough appreciation of the possibilities of the soil, the need of 
the proper use of fertilizers and acquiring a knowledge of plant and 
animal life. In other words, agricultural instruction of a funda- 
mental character is being introduced into the schools of the state, 
and the fact that the boys have often been able to produce 100 
bushels of corn per acre, has demonstrated the economic value of 
work of this character. 

BOLL WEEVIL PREPAREDNESS 

The Mexican cotton boll weevil has spread over the greater part 
of the cotton belt of Georgia and in 1918 did considerable damage 
in the southeastern section of the state. Because of the invasion of 



202 UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

this pest, the extension forces have during the past two years been 
giving a great deal of attention to the growing of cotton under boll 
weevil conditions and the utilization of the surplus acreage made 
vacant as a necessary means of combating this evil. Several live 
stock specialists are now employed by the College in cooperation 
with the United States Department of Agriculture, business inter- 
ests and county officials. These men, in cooperation with the live 
stock and farm crop specialists, have waged several campaigns in 
the interest of cotton growing and diversified farming under boll 
weevil conditions. Because of the ravages of this pest, live stock 
farming has received a great impetus and many car loads of pure 
bred cattle, hogs and work horses have been introduced. The sur- 
plus acreage has been planted to peanuts, velvet beans, cowpeas, 
oats, corn and other general farm crops necessary for the Increased 
production of live stock. Several oil mills have been constructed 
to take care of the surplus acreage in peanuts and many feed mills 
have been organized to utilize velvet bean and corn products. In 
special localities the trucking and fruit industry has been materially 
improved. 

EXTENSION SCHOOLS 

It is believed that one of the most efficient ways by which the 
farmer can be served is through the organization and promotion of 
extension schools. The people of each community put up a mini- 
mum guarantee of paid-up registered students before the school is 
given. Extension schools are now being held at the District Agri- 
cultural Schools where district demonstration agents are located. 
The extension schools form the basis of a week's farmers' short 
course for the district agricultural schools. They are of four days' 
duration and are conducted in a thoroughly practical manner. 
Among the subjects discussed are the mixing and application of fer- 
tilizers, soils and soil cultivation, tillage and tillage implements, the 
selection and improvement of seed corn and cotton, diseases of live 
stock, dairying, poultry husbandry, fruit and truck problems, spray- 
ing and orchard management and the feeding and care of live stock. 
A new feature of the extension school is the Home Economics De- 
partment which has been added this year and is proving of much 
interest to farm women and girls. Specialists in cooking, home can- 
ning, preserving, butter making, poultry and other kindred subjects, 
give instructions and demonstrations to farm women and girls in at- 
tendance at the school. 

Speakers are sent from the College to address farmers' gatherings 
or to discuss subjects of special interest to a given community. The 
officers of the College are working in cooperation with the county 
school commissioners, and lecturers are sent to teachers' institutes 
for the purpose of discussing ways and means by which instruction 



THE COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 203 

in agriculture in the common schools as provided by law, may be 
inaugurated. No service can be rendered the people of the state 
at this time more important than that of fostering the teaching of 
the underlying principles of agriculture in the public schools. 

Another feature of extension work which the College is fostering 
is correspondence with farmers. Thousands of letters are annually 
answered, giving definite information relative to fertilizers, soils, 
crops, care and management of live stock, orchards and gardens. 
Every farmer in the state is invited to take advantage of the free 
information afforded by correspondence. In this way at the cost of 
postage, any individual may obtain information worth a great deal 
of money to him. 

The College stands ready to assist every organization and indi- 
vidual entitled to its service. 

FARMERS' INSTITUTES 

During the year, 4,400 meetings were held and 170,454 people 
reached exclusive of those reached through the distribution of bul- 
letins, other printed matter, correspondence or those served by the 
county agents. 

Regular farmers' institutes numbered 104 with an attendance of 
14,294. 

Enrolled and visited during the past year 82,966, including farm- 
ers, their wives and boys and girls as follows: corn club, 6,057; pig 
clubs, 4,559; poultry clubs, 1,050; canning clubs, 5,213; four-crop 
clubs, 284; miscellaneous clubs, 324; farmers' clubs, 5,975; calf 
clubs, 1,129; farmers, 52,975; farm women, 5,400. 

COUNTY AGENTS 

County agents are now employed in over one hundred counties 
of the state. There are 126 men agents and 114 women agents. 
The following are statistics covering the work of men agents: 

Number miles traveled by railroad 94,992 

Number miles traveled by team 5,538 

Number miles traveled otherwise 867,900 

Total number field meetings 1,039 

Number articles prepared for publication 2,051 

Number circular letters written and sent out 135,401 

Number bulletins sent out 113,688 

Number of visits to school 6,404 

PROJECTS 

The various projects in operation in the extension division of the 
Georgia State College of Agriculture are as follows: county agricul- 
tural agents, county agents in home economics, boys' corn clubs, 



204 UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

pig clubs, calf clubs, girls' canning and poultry clubs, movable 
schools, farmers' institutes and general meetings, educational exhib- 
its at state and county fairs, live stock extension, agronomy exten- 
sion, dairy extension, horticulture extension, agricultural engineer- 
ing, marketing, publications, live stock diseases, plant pathology, 
forestry, bee-keeping, and the preventive treatment of farm timbers 
to prolong life. 



THE PEABODY SCHOOL OF EDUCATION 205 



THE PEABODY SCHOOL OF EDUCATION 



OFFICIALS 

DAVID CRENSHAW BARROW, LL.D., Chancellor of the University. 

CHARLES MERCER SNELLING, D.Sc, President of Franklin Col- 
lege and Dean of the University. 

THOMAS JACKSON WOOFTER, LL.D., Dean of the School of Edu- 
cation. 

SPECIAL. FACULTY 

THOMAS JACKSON WOOFTER, A.M., Ph.D., Professor of Phil- 
osophy and Educational Philosophy. 

JOSEPH SPENCER STEWART, A.M., Ped.D., Professor of Educa- 
tion, High School Visitor. 

AUSTIN SOUTHWICK EDWARDS, Ph.D., Professor of Psychology, 
General and Educational, and Director of the Psychological 
Laboratory. 

CORNELIUS JACOB HEATWOLE, B.S., M.S., Professor of Sociol- 
ogy and of the Principles of Education. 

, Professor of Philosophy, and Educational Ad- 
ministration and Supervision. 

, Assistant Professor of the History of Education 

and of Teaching Special Branches. 

GENERAL FACULTY 

All members of the faculties of Franklin College, the College of 
Agriculture and Mechanic Arts, the School of Law, and the School 
of Commerce, from which elective courses may be taken. 

HISTORICAL BRIEF 

In June, 1908, the trustees adopted a plan to convert the chair 
of Philosophy and Education into a School of Education, to provide 
a special building, and to enlarge the staff of instruction. 

The matter of a general building was taken up with the Trustees 
and General Agent of the Peabody Education Fund, and, pending 
an adjustment of this fund there was a delay in the development of 
the School of Education. In June, 1911, it being fairly certain that 
an appropriation from the Peabody Fund would be made for the 
special building, the trustees of the University agreed to provide the 
annual maintenance to secure- the Peabody appropriation. In De- 
cember, 1911, the Peabody Board appropriated $40,000 for the 
building. Plans were matured and the construction completed in 
April, 1913. It is known as George Peabody Hall, in honor of 
George Peabody who, in 1867, made his great gift to the cause of 
education in the South. This home of the Peabody School of Edu- 



206 UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

cation is one of the most artistic, substantial, and well equipped 
buildings on the campus, an appropriate memorial to the South's 
greatest educational philanthropist. 

Admission of Women. In September, 1918, the trustees of the 
University passed a resolution opening the State College of Agricul- 
ture and Mechanic Arts and the Peabody School of Education to 
women on an equal footing with men, beginning September, 1919. 
This was by way of action upon the petition of the School of Educa- 
tion. From the very first the admission was championed and antic- 
ipated by the School of Education, and well planned and equipped 
Home Economics rooms were included in George Peabody Hall. In 
other points this building was planned for co-education. 

SCOPE 

Developing from the chair of Philosophy and Education the 
School of Education provides for the University not only the courses 
in education but also the courses in the other .philosophical-social 
sciences, psychology, sociology, ethics, and general philosophy. 
Since these mutually contribute so much to each other, it is well to 
have them under common direction. 

The School of Education is a college in the University for the fol- 
lowing services: 

1. The preparation of teachers for high schools, normal schools, 
and special subjects; of special supervisors and superintendents of 
schools. 

Such teachers and superintendents should have advanced col- 
legiate scholarship and special preparation for their peculiar pro- 
fession. It is beyond the province of the ordinary normal school to 
give much collegiate instruction, and our state normal schools are 
overburdened with the work to provide the elementary teachers. 
We must evidently look to the college and university for the educa- 
tion of teachers in the higher schools, for supervisors and leaders. 

2. The study of the social sciences, psychology, sociology, ethics, 
education, anthropology, and philosophy, as instruments of culture 
and factors of social control, social betterment, and economic pro- 
gress. 

The great problems agitating the world today are in these fields, 
and all turn to education for final solution. Education is a social 
problem of great importance, and its study takes rank in a curri- 
culum with sociology, political science, and all social sciences. 

These social sciences are the human sciences which look to the 
betterment and the happiness of man. The School of Education 
purposes to unify these in Franklin College of Arts and the State 
College of Agriculture and Mechanic Arts. 



THE PEABODY SCHOOL OF EDUCATION 207 

LABORATORIES 

The Psychological Laboratory occupies about eight rooms on the 
first floor of George Peabody Hall and is equipped with the latest 
psychological instruments for qualitative and quantitative studies 
of such mental phenomena as the senses, the feelings, attention, 
memory, etc. Every room can be brought into connection with 
every other room by a system of electrical wiring. All rooms are 
supplied with alternating electric current and gas, and most of them 
with city water and sinks. One room can be used for a photographic 
darkroom, while two others will be devoted especially to research 
work. There is equipment for experimental pedagogy, and mental 
and educational tests and measurements. 

The Home Economics Laboratories includes a large kitchen lab- 
oratory, pantry, dining room, class room, clothing and textile room, 
well equipped with modern furnishings. The use of these during 
several summer sessions has proved them well and comfortably 
adapted. 

DEPARTMENTS 

As outlined under scope there are two chief departments: 

1. Department of Philosophical-Social Science; psychology, so- 
ciology, 'philosophy, ethics, anthropology, ethnology, and general 
studies in education. 

2. Department of Education; history, principles, methods, phil- 
osophy, administration, and supervision of education. 

DEGREES AND REQUIREMENTS 

Bachelor of Arts 

This degree, Bachelor of Arts in the Social Sciences, has recently 
been provided to permit the election of major courses in social 
science. The old Bachelor of Arts requires the major courses in 
foreign languages. 

Entrance requirements: English, 3 units; Latin, 3 units; math- 
ematics, 2V 2 units; history, 2 units; additional, SV 2 units; total, 14. 

Degree requirements: English, 3 hours; Latin, 3 hours; mathe- 
matics, 3 hours; additional Latin or mathematics, 3 hours; an addi- 
tional foreign language, 6 hours; natural sciences, 6 hours; history- 
political science-economics, 9 hours; philosophical social science. 6 
hours; education, 6 hours; additional, 6 hours in philosophical- 
social science or in education; military or physical education, 3 
hours; elective, 12 hours; total, 6 6 hours. 

If Greek is elected as the additional foreign language, the total 
requirements will be 63 hours. 

Women substitute home economics for the additional Latin or 
mathematics, 3 hours. 



208 UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

The courses must be selected under the direction and approval of 
the Dean of the School of Education. 

An hour as here used means a recitation hour with its proper 
preparation running through the college year. 

Bachelor of Education 

This degree is offered, giving liberal opportunity for study in the 
human and social sciences, and special opportunity for preparation 
for educational work. It differs slightly from the Bachelor of Arts 
requirements in foreign language, English, and mathematics. 

Entrance requirements: 14 units as follows: English, 3; mathe- 
matics, 2V 2 ', history, 2; any foreign language, 2; additional, 4*£. 

Degree requirements: English, 6 hours; mathematics, 6 hours; 
natural sciences, 6 hours; history, 3 hours; psychology, 3 hours; 
philosophy social science, 3 hours; foreign languages, 6 hours in 
each of two; education, 12 hours; military or physical education, 3 
hours; elective, 12 hours; total, 6 6 hours. 

Women substitute home economics for 3 hours of mathematics. 

The above elections and requirements must be with the approval 
of the Dean of the School of Education. 

ARRANGEMENT OF COURSES 

For Bachelor of Arts Freshman and Sophomore courses would 
arrange about as follows: 

Freshman Sophomore 

Hours Hours 

Latin 1__ 3 Latin 2 or Mathematics 3-4 

English 1 3 (men) 3 

Mathematics 1-2 3 Home Economics (women) _ 3 

History 3 A foreign language _____ 3 

Georgia History 1 (Continued from Freshman) 

A foreign language _____ 3 Two natural science _____ 6 

(Spanish, French, German, Psychology _________ 3 

Greek). Elective __________3 

Military (men) _______ Military or physical education 

Physical Education (women) 

Note: — This statement of hours has reference to work taken in 
the University or in institutions credited for advanced standing. 

JUNIOR AND SENIOR (SENIOR COLLEGE) COURSES 

The remainder of courses enumerated in the requirements and 
the additional elective courses to complete the total of 66 hours 
must be arranged not later than the beginning of the Junior year 
in accordance with the approval of the Dean of Education. 

Students coming from other colleges with 30 acceptable hours to 
their credit may enter with Senior College standing, but 36 hours of 
credit will be necessary for full Senior College rating. 

For Bachelor of Education, Freshman and Sophomore courses 
would arrange about as follows: 



THE PEABODY SCHOOL OF EDUCATION 209 

Freshman Sophomore 

Hours Hours 

English 1 3 English 2 3 

Mathematics 1-2 3 Mathematics 3-4 3 

A foreign language _____ 3 A foreign language _____ 3 

History __________3 Psychology 1_______3 

A natural science ______3 A natural science or 

Military or History, or 

Physical Education Economics ________ 3 

Military or 

Physical Education 

Elective _________ 3 

Note: — See note under Bachelor of Arts. 

JUNIOR AND SENIOR (SENIOR COLLEGE) COL^SES 

A foreign language two years and other courses enumerated in 
the requirements, also additional elective courses to complete the 
total of 6 6 hours. The scheme for these must be arranged not later 
than the beginning of the Junior year in accordance with the ap- 
proval of the Dean of Education. 

Students coming from other colleges with 30 acceptable hours to 
their credit may enter with Senior College standing, but 36 hours 
of credit will be necessary for full Senior College rating. 

SELECTION OF COURSES 

The schedule of each year must be elected under the advice cf 
the Dean of the School. 

The foregoing curricula contemplate a selection of a major group 
of courses in the philosophical-social sciences or in the education 
studies. The major includes 12 hours minimum. With the major 
in either of these departments, a minor of 9 hours must be taken in 
history-political science-economics, except in the Bachelor of Edu- 
cation curriculum. 

The major, the minor, and the electives should be chosen for 
some definite purpose in life. 

The Teacher's Professional Certificate 

The State Board of Education has provided for teachers' licenses 
of professional rank based upon completion of college courses lead- 
ing to graduation, provided, that a certain portion of the time has 
been given to professional courses preparatory to educational work, 
and that some representative of the State Board of Education has 
aided in and approved the examinations. 

"A graduate of an approved (14 unit) college who has included- 
in his college courses three courses in Education of three hours each 
throughout a college year, or the equivalent, will be eligible for a 
professional certificate good for three years in any grade of educa- 
tional work, and renewable thereafter indefinitely, the renewal 



210 • UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

based on successful experience and an examination on the State 
Reading Course for the year." 

These three courses are to be taken from Education 1-2, 3, 4-8, 
5-6, 7, 9-10. 

This Professional Certificate will be awarded with any degree for 
which the three courses in education were included, provided that a 
creditable scholarship average is made. This average should not 
be lower than B. 

COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

I. DEPARTMENT OF PHILOSOPHICAL.- SOCIAL SCIENCE 

PSYCHOLOGY 

1. Elementary Psychology. This course will introduce to the gen- 
eral field of psychology and to educational psychology. It will take 
up in lecture and recitations such topics as sensations, feelings, 
imagery, attention, association, memory, reasoning, will and action 
with illustrations by experimental demonstrations. Periods of child 
growth and development, tests for psychological age, applications to 
practical educational problems. Three hours, first half-year. Pro- 
fessor Edwards. 

This course may be followed in the second half-year by Psychology 
3 or by Education 2. , 

3. Applied Psychology. Topics selected each year, but chiefly 
from the following: 

3a. Psychology of Business Procedure. After a brief review of the 
principles of social psychology this course is devoted mainly to a 
discussion of such mental factors as attention, suggestion, habit, imi- 
tation, practice, fatigue, and others, involved in the problems of 
advertising and salesmanship. (It will also illustrate the use of 
mental tests in vocational guidance, especially with reference to se- 
lecting applicants and placing employees in larger industrial and 
mercantile plants). 

3&. Legal and Vocational Psychology. This course deals with the 
psychological problems of law and of every-day life. 

3c. Abnormal Psychology. The subject-matter of this course will 
be especially adapted to students preparing for the medical profes- 
sion but will nevertheless be general enough to appeal to others. 
After a short survey of the problems of idiocy, imbecility, and feeble- 
mindedness, the most important acquired and inherited mental de- 
fects are studied, such as amnesia, maniac excitement and depres- 
sion, abulia, delusions, obsessions, hysteria, aphasia, various forms 
of dementia, psychotherapy and general health. Prerequisite for 
the above: Psychology 1 or 5. Professor Edwards. 

5. Principles of Psychology. This will be a more detailed study 



THE PEABODY SCHOOL OF EDUCATION 211 

of the standpoints, problems, methods, laws, and physiological basis 
of psychology. Its various sub-branches and relations to philosophy 
and other sciences will be outlined, and such topics as the struc- 
tural, functional, and genetic aspects of mind as well as dreams, 
hypnosis, neurosis, criminal action, and animal behavior will be dis- 
cussed. Three hours weekly, throughout the year. This may be 
taken as a beginning course. Junior or Senior credit. Professor 
Edwards. 

5a. Laboratory Work. One laboratory period of two hours per 
week may be taken in connection with No. 5, to have this combina- 
tion counted as a Science in Group II. Professor Edwards. 

6. Experimental Psychology. The student will perform experi- 
ments and introspective exercises on such topics as color-vision, 
sound-localization, expression of feelings, laws of attention and 
memory, reaction-times, Weber's law, absolute and differential 
limen, etc. The work will be based largely on Titchener's Manual 
of Experimental Psychology, Vol. 1. Qualitative Experiments, with 
experiments selected from other sources. 

This course may be counted as a Science in Group II. Prere- 
quisite: Courses 1 or 5. The nature of the work makes it necessary 
for students to work in pairs, and preferably, for two hours at a 
time. Junior or Senior credit. Professor Edwards. 

7. Advanced Educational Psychology. Characteristics and stages 
of mental development, adolescence, individual differences, mental 
training and culture, mental and educational tests and measure- 
ments, etc. Three hours, the year. Professor Edwards. 

20. Systematic Psychology: Graduate Course. An advanced and 
detailed study of theoretical discussions and original investigations 
regarding a single special topic, as sensations, attention, memory, 
etc., and their quantitative treatment, with parallel reading of one 
general systematic treatise. Prerequisite: Psychology 1-2 or 5, 
and 6. 

Major: Two conferences and four hours experimental work, 
weekly. 

Minor: One conference and two hours experimental work, weekly. 
See Graduate School. I'rofessor Edwards. 

21. Advanced Educational Psychology: Graduate Course. An ad- 
vanced and detailed study of systematic treatise on educational psy- 
chology and its quantitative methods of investigation. Prerequisite: 
Psychology 1-2 or 5, and 6. 

Major: Two conferences a week and work including laboratory 
equivalent to one-half a year's graduate study. 

Minor: One conference a week and work including laboratory 
equivalent to one-fourth a year's graduate study. Professor Edwards. 



212 UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

SOCIOIX)GY 

5. Social Evolution. An introduction to the study of society 
through the approach of organic and social evolution; anthropology, 
heredity, morality, social organization, democracy, social problems, 
and other introductory topics. Three hours, first half-year. Pro- 
fessor Woofter. 

6. Educational Sociology. Democracy the goal of social evolu- 
tion; spirit of modern democracy; education the agency of social in- 
heritance; education in a democracy; the evolution of the school; 
modern educational doctrine. Three hours, second half-year. Pro- 
fessor Woofter. 

9. Principles of Sociology. 

a. The elements of sociology. Social theory. A study of the best 
principles of sociological theory with comparison of different authors. 
Functional and applied sociology interpreted. Educational sociology 
defined. 

b. Modern social problems. A study of current social problems in 
the light of sound theory. The city; the country; the negro; the im- 
migrant; the liquor problem; crime and vice; poverty and pauper- 
ism; the home and family; the state; the church; social philan- 
thropy. 

c. Practical applications. Social statistics. Sociology with special 
reference to leadership. Problems of vocational education. Some 
specific study in the outside field. Three hours, the year. Professor 
Heatwole. 

20. Advanced Sociology. An advanced course in the study of con- 
structive progress in society . 

(a) Historical and Theoretical Sociology. The study of the evolu- 
tion of society and the history of civilization. Primitive society; 
civilization, modern development. Readings: Taylor, Morgan, Sum- 
ner, Boas, Giddings, and others. 

(b) Social Theories. The study of the Principal Theories of 
Society. Readings: Comte, Spencer, Montesquieu, Buckle, Bagehot, 
Tarde, Giddings, and others. 

(c) The Sociological in Education. Brief Historical Study of Ed- 
ucation. Readings: Plato, Aristotle, Pestalozzi, Herbart, Froebel, 
Rousseau, Spencer, (in summary text), Ward, Hall, and others. 

(d) Modern Applied Sociology and Education. One practical 
problem in the field selected for research. 

As major, four hours a week throughout the year, an additional 
seminar last term, and thesis. 

As minor, two hours a week throughout the year and an addi- 
tional seminar last term. Prerequisite: Sociology 5-6, or 9. See 
Graduate School. Professor Heatwole. 

21. Problems of Rural Life and Education. An advanced course. 



THE PEABODY SCHOOL OF EDUCATION 213 

(a) The Principles of Rural Sociology. A study of rural life and 
society. Bailey, Carver, Gillette, Foght, and others, with local stud- 
ies. 

(b) Fundamentals of Rural Progress. A constructive program of 
rural progress. An original outline and program will be followed 
and developed. 

(c) Practical problems. An important problem of rural life or 
the rural school will be selected for research and application of prin- 
ciples and theories studied. 

As minor, two hours a week throughout the year with an addi- 
tional seminar during the third term. Prerequisite: Sociology 5-6, 
or 9. See Graduate School. Professor Heativole. 

PHILOSOPHY 

3. Ethics. A study of human conduct in its philosophical, socio- 
logical, psychological, and physiological phases. The moral aspects 
of present day problems of society, democracy, and human life gen- 
erally. Three hours, first half. Professor , Professor 

Woofter. 

4. Introduction to Philosophy. Historical introduction presenting 
the great thinkers, the movements of thought, and special studies in 
some field, logic or modern thought. Three hours, second half-year. 
Professor . 

5-6. Evolution. Organic, social, educational; anthropology; phil- 
osophy of education. Three hours, the year. Professor Woofter. 

7. Modern Philosophy. A survey of modern thought with special 
studies of ideals of life expressed in philosophical and literary clas- 
sics. Three hours, the year. Professor . 

9. Social Philosophy. Given with Sociology 9. Three hours, the 
year. Professor Heatwole. 

26. Advanced History of Philosophy. 

1. An introduction to the problems of philosophy. 

2. A survey of the three general periods of the history of phil- 
osophy with fuller study of the modern field. 

3. Readings in philosophical classics, such as Plato, The Republic; 
Marcus Aurelius, Meditation; Bacon, "The Advancement of Learn- 
ing;" Darwin, "The Origin of Species;" Spencer, "First Principles;" 
James, "Pragmatism," or others as selected each year. Prerequisite: 
Philosophy 4, or its equivalent. Graduate course. Professor Woofter, 
Professor . 

H. DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 
EDUCATION 

1. Elementary Educational Psychology. This course will intro- 
duce to the general field of psychology and to educational psychol- 
ogy. It will take up in lecture and recitations such topics as sen- 



214 UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

sations, feelings, imagery, attention, association, memory, reasoning, 
will and action with illustrations by experimental demonstrations. 
Periods of child growth and development, tests for psychological 
age, applications to practical educational problems. Three hours, 
first half-year. Professor Edwards. 

2. The History and Principles of Education. A study of the gen- 
esis and development of educational ideals and practices from prim- 
itive man to the present. Emphasis is placed upon the processes of 
change and development. Historical analysis of the principles in- 
volved with special reference to modern applications. Three hours 
a week, second half-year. This should follow Psychology 1. Pro- 
fessor Heatwole. 

3. Principles of Teaching and Management; School Hygiene. Gen- 
eral principles of method, application to various branches of study, 
types of class exercises, the art of study, supervised study, discip- 
line, general problems of directing school work, school hygiene and 
sanitation, and community cooperation. Three hours, the year. 
Professor Heatwole. 

4. Secondary Education. 

a. The American High School, its development, organization, 
courses of study, methods of teaching, and administration. A com- 
parison with secondary schools in leading foreign countries. 

b. Observation and teaching in the high school of Athens with 
visits to other high schools of the state. Two hours a week through- 
out the year. (See also Education 8). 

5-6. Introductory Educational Sociology and Philosophy. 

a. An introduction to the study of society through the approach of 
organic and social evolution; anthropology; heredity; morality, so- 
cial organization, democracy, social problems vital for education, 
and other introductory topics. 

b. Democracy the goal of social evolution; study of modern 
democracy; education the agency of social inheritance; education 
in a democracy; the evolution of the school; modern educational 
organization and doctrine. Three hours, the year. Professor Woofter. 

7. Advanced Educational Psychology. Characteristics and stages 
of mental development, adolescence, individual differences, mental 
training and culture, mental and educational tests and measure- 
ments, etc. Three hours, the year. Professor Edwards. 

8. The Teaching of Special Subjects. Short courses will be ar- 
ranged to review and discuss the teaching in the high school of va- 
rious branches, mathematics, physics, general science, history-Eng- 
lish, Latin-Spanish, and others as practicable. These will mostly 
be one-hour courses supplementing Education 4. 

9. Education in the United States. An advanced course in the 
history of education treating the needs of a democracy, the evolu- 



THE PEABODY SCHOOL OF EDUCATION 215 

tion of schools and school systems, the types of education needed, 
problems of readjustment, and other problems of the day. Three 
hours, first half-year. 

10. The Administration and Supervision of Public Education in 
the United States. Continuing Course 9 through the year. Pro- 
fessor . 

24. See Graduate School. 

25. See Graduate School. 

26. Principles of Education. Biological, Sociological, Psycholog- 
ical. Graduate course, Summer School. 

VOCATIONAL EDUCATION 

The following are special courses for Smith-Hughes students. See 
Division of Agricultural Education, College of Agriculture. 

Education X. Vocational Educational Psychology and Principles 
of Teaching. Three hours, the year. Professor Heatwole. 

Education Y. Rural Sociology and Rural Economics. Three 
hours, the year. Professor Heatwole. 

Education Z. School Administration and Supervision. Half-year. 
Professor . 



216 UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

SCHOOL OF COMMERCE 

FACULTY 

DAVID CRENSHAW BARROW, DL.D., Chancellor of the University. 

HOWARD DOUGLAS DOZIER, A.M., Associate Professor of Finance 
and Acting Director of the School of Commerce. 

HOWELL ARTHUR INGHRAM, B.S. in Commerce, Instructor in 
Accounting. 

* , Adjunct Professor of Economics. 

* , Instructor in Stenography and Typewriting. 

ROBERT PRESTON BROOKS, Ph.D., DeRenne Professor of Geor- 
gia History. 

AUSTIN SOUTHWICK EDWARDS, Ph.D., Professor of Psychology. 
WALTER GROVER CORNETT, LLjB., Professor of Law. 
CORNELIUS JACOB HEATWOLE, A.M., Professor of Education. 
JOHN HANSON THOMAS McPHERSON, Ph.D., Professor of His- 
tory and Political Science. 

WILLIAM OSCAR PAYNE, A.M., Associate Professor of History and 
Political Science. 

ROBERT SPENCER POND, Ph.D., Adjunct Professor of Mathemat- 
ics and Instructor in Statistics. 

RAFAEL WILLIAM RAMIREZ, A.B., Adjunct Professor of Ro- 
mance Languages and Instructor in South American History 
and Relations. 

STEADMAN VINCENT SANFORD, A.B., Litt.D., Professor of Eng- 
lish Language and Instructor in Advertising. 

ROSWELL POWELL STEPHENS, Ph.D., Associate Professor of 
Mathematics and Instructor in Investment Mathematics. 



To be supplied. 



THE SCHOOL OF COMMERCE 



217 



GENERAL STATEMENT 



Purpose and Scope of the School 

The School of Commerce of the University of Georgia was or- 
ganized in 1912 in response to a demand for courses which would 
fit men for business careers. Approximately sixty per cent of the 
graduates of the University enter business pursuits. 

The work of the School is intended to embrace the general field 
of Economics and to give this large percentage of the student body 
an opportunity to acquire the fundamental principles underlying 
business. With this end in view, the course of study has been ar- 
ranged so as to give a general education and at the same time spe- 
cial technical training. In general, the work of the Freshman and 
Sophomore years embraces those subjects commonly recognized as 
essential in any walk of life; that of the Junior and Senior years 
is more specialized. 

Entrance Requirements 

Students at least sixteen years of age are admitted to candidacy 
for the degree in Commerce, provided they have completed the fol- 
lowing courses in an accredited high school or have otherwise been 
accorded credit in the University for the units specified: 



English ______ 

History _______ 

Mathematics _ _ _ _ _2 



3 units Modern language - - 2 
3 units (or foreign language) _3 
5 units Elective ______ _4.5 

(or 3.5 when 3 units of 
foreign language are 
offered). 



units 
units 
units 



Course of Study 



Freshman 



Sophomore 



Hours 

English 1 3 

Mathematics 1, 2 _____ 3 
Foreign language ______ 3 

Physics 1, 2 3 

Economics 1 (Geography 

and Industry) ______ 3 

History 2_ 3 

Military Science ______ 1 

Practice work ________ 2 



Hours 

English 2 3 

Mathematics 4a, 6 or (3, 4) 3 
(Mathematics of Invest- 
ments and Satistics). 
History 4a or 4______3 

Economics 5 (Elementary 

Economics) ________ 3 

Economics 16 (Accounting) _ 3 
Modern language ______ 3 

Practice work ______ __2 



21 



20 



218 UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 



Junior Senior 

Economics 6 (Banking) _ _ _ 3 Elective in Economics _ _ _ _ 6 

Economics 17 (Accounting) _ 3 History 13 or 

*Modern language ______ 3 History 15_________3 

Psychology 1,2 3 Elective in Economics, His- 

Natural Science or tory, Sociology, English, 

History 13 (Industrial His- Education, Modern Lan- 

tory of U. S.) or guage, Political Science _ _ 6 
History 15 (South American Practice work 2 

History and Relations) _ _ 3 

Practice work ________ 2 

17 17 



* Of the nine hours required in language at least six must be 
taken in the same modern language. 

STUDENTS IN OTHER DEPARTMENTS 

Certain courses offered in the School of Commerce are open to 
students of other departments of the University. Those who have 
time for only one course in the School should elect Economics 5. 
For those who can devote more time to the study of the subject, 
Economics 6 and Economics 16 are best adapted. 

COURSES OF STUDY 

Only courses in Economics and closely allied subjects are described 
in this announcement. The Bulletin of the University contains de- 
scriptions of courses in the other departments. The courses here 
described consist of three recitations a week throughout the year 
unless otherwise specified. 

1. Geography and Industry. Associate Professor Dozier. 

A comparative study is made of the present status of industry and 
commerce of the principal countries of the world. The chief pro- 
ducts and industries; the commercial and industrial centers; the 
distribution of population; the location, use, and conservation of 
natural resources; and international trade, are some of the topics 
considered. 

5. Elementary Economics. Open to Sophomores and upper class- 
men. Associate Professor Dozier, Mr. Inghram, and * . 

The laws of consumption, wealth, production, price, value, rent, 
interest, and wages are studied. Money, credit, banking, business 
cycles, industrial corporations, public utilities, the laws of interna- 
tional trade and tariff policy, taxation and public expenditures, and 
the problems of labor, and economic progress are considered. 

This course gives an introduction to such advanced courses as 



* To be supplied. 



THE SCHOOL OF COMMERCE 219 

marketing, banking, transportation, the trust problem, and business 
problems in general. No advanced course in Economics can be 
taken prior to Economics 5. 

It contains the fundamentals that every collegiate citizen should 
know as a basis for sound thinking on public and private business 
problems. 

6. Money and Banking. Associate Professor Dozier. 

This course is an elementary -one in the theory, history and prob- 
lems of money and banking. The problem's of money are studied 
first, and the principles of the banking business, banking organiza- 
tion, and bank supervision are then considered. The national bank- 
ing system as modified by the Federal Reserve Act and the control 
of farm credit by the national government are considered. The 
problem of credit in general is also studied. 

7. Corporation Management and Finance. First half-year. * 



This course includes a study of the financial organization and 
management of corporations. The nature of corporations i^ studied, 
as well as their advantages and disadvantages, and they are con- 
trasted with partnerships. Attention is also given to the reorgani- 
zation of corporations which have gone into the hands of a receiver. 

8. Transportation. First half-year. Associate Professor Dozier. 

The development of waterways and their decline, the develop- 
ment of railways and the part played by transportation in the indus- 
trial and commercial development of the United States are intro- 
ductory subjects. Railways are studied as the most highly develop- 
ed and most complex form of business organization, as a form of 
business directly affecting most other businesses, and as one of the 
factors of national development. The Act to Regulate Commerce 
and the work of both the Interstate Commerce Commission and the 
State Commissions are considered. Freight rates and passenger 
fares, the valuation of the railways, and the problem of rate regula- 
tion are topics covered. The latter part of the course will be de- 
voted to ocean transportation. 

11. Marketing. Second half-year. Associate Professor Dozier. 

In this course the marketing of farm products through organ- 
ized central markets and cooperative agricultural marketing asso- 
ciations is studied. The functions performed by the middle men 
are also studied. Following this the methods employed by manu- 
facturer, wholesalers, and retailers are investigated, together with 
the part played by the commission house. 

12. Personal Insurance. First half-year. * . 

Insurance ranks with the most important businesses of the coun- 
try, and the economic need for it and the uses of various kinds of 
policies for the protection of business and family obligations create 



* To be supplied. 



220 UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

an increasing demand for it. Some knowledge of the theory and 
practice of insurance is, therefore, useful to every man, and is of 
especial value to those engaged in any form of commercial activity. 
This course will give the student that knowledge of the subject 
which will enable him to understand thoroughly the different poli- 
cies and choose in an intelligent manner that one which will most 
effectively protect his interests; and, should he decide to enter the 
profession, will give him that knowledge of the business which he 
can most easily secure by systematic study. 

13. Property Insurance. Second half-year. * . 

Property insurance is also of general importance. Insurance is 
now an important element in all commercial undertakings; conse- 
quently it is important that every student of business should at least 
have a general knowledge of it. In this course are studied the 
policy contracts, the insurance laws, kinds of companies, and their 
organization, analysis of policies, conditions, etc., of fire, marine, 
fidelity, surety, title and credit insurance. 

15. Advertising and Salesmanship. Professor Sanford. 

Special attention to selling plans and special campaigns; prepara- 
tion of copy. 

16. Elementary Accounting. Mr. Inghrwm. 

The purpose of this course is to give to the student that knowl- 
edge of the general principles of accounting which will enable him 
as a manager or manager-owner of a business to direct his book- 
keepers intelligently and to profit by the work of his accountants. 
It is also a foundation for the advanced courses in accounting 
should he desire to enter the accounting profession. Since this 
course does not presume any knowledge of bookkeeping, a large 
part of the work is devoted to douible entry bookkeeping accompan- 
ied by practice work in the laboratory. The rest of the work com- 
prises a study of the balance and income sheets, revenue, capital, 
depreciation, partnership, and corporation accounts. 

17. Advanced Accounting. Prerequisite: Elementary Accounting. 
Mr. Inghram. 

This course is a continuation of the work begun in the first year. 
During the first half of the year, special attention is given to cor- 
poration accounting and to the accounting peculiarities of a few 
other businesses. It gives the student a more extensive knowledge 
of the subject than does elementary accounting. The second half 
of the year is devoted largely to miscellaneous problems affecting 
different types of business organizations. 

18. Cost Accounting. Second half-year. Prerequisite: Elemen- 



* To be supplied. 



THE SCHOOL OF COMMERCE 221 

tary Accounting. Advanced Accounting must be taken at the same 
time. Mr. Ingliram. 

This course continues the study of cost accounting as briefly in- 
troduced in Advanced Accounting. It gives the student practice in 
constructing systems that show the costs, the effectiveness of labor 
employed, and the materials used. Investigations of the cost sys- 
tems of typical industries are made, and methods of ascertaining 
both prime and overhead costs are studied in detail. This course 
will be of special benefit to the student who is planning to enter the 
accounting profession. 

19. Auditing. First half-year. Prerequisite: Elementary Ac- 
counting. Advanced Accounting must be taken at the same time. 
Mr. Inghram. 

The student receives instruction relative to the qualifications of 
the public auditor and the procedure in conducting both the de- 
tailed and balance-sheet audits. Analytical power and initiative are 
developed by requiring the student to do practical auditing work. 

24. Introductory Course in Business Law. First half-year. Pro- 
fessor Cornett. 

Law as related to ordinary business transactions, elementary prin- 
ciples of contracts, negotiable instruments, agency, and bankruptcy, 
practical work in the legal problems which confront the business 
man, garnishments, attachments, and conveyances. 

25. Law of Corporations, Banking, and Insurance. Second half- 
year. Professor Cornett. 

Rights and liabilities of partners; formation, management, and 
dissolution of partnerships and corporations; rights and liabilities 
of stockholders, directors, and officers; banks and banking; in- 
surance. 

2 8. Foreign Trade. First half-year. * . 

Exporting and importing are studied, and stress is placed on ex- 
porting. The various forms of organization and methods of indi- 
vidual corporations and cooperative associations are studied. The 
problems and practice of such subjects as packing, shipping, for- 
warding, insurance, exchanges, credits and collections are included. 

Especial attention is given to the foreign trade of the United 
States. 

PSYCHOLOGY, EDUCATION, AND SOCIOLOGY 

For a description of the courses given in these subjects, see under 
the School of Education. 

(BUSINESS) MATHEMATICS 

4a. Insurance and the Theory of Investment. Open to Sopho- 
mores, first half-year. Associate Professor Stephens. 



* To be supplied. 



22 2 UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

An elementary course in probabilities and series as applied to the 
general theory of investment and in particular to life insurance. 

6. Statistical Method and Principles. Open to Sophomores, sec- 
ond half-year. Adjunct Professor Pond. 

An introduction to statistical methods and principles, including 
exercises in methods and problems. 

HISTORY AND POLITICAL SCIENCE 

2. European History. Professors McPherson, Brooks, and Payne. 

The development of agriculture, industry, commerce, and finance 
from colonial days to the present time is treated in this course. 

4a. Economic History of England and Modern Continental Eu- 
rope. Professor Payne. 

A survey of English History with special emphasis on the develop- 
ment of agriculture, commerce, and industry. This course will be 
extended to include a similar study of Continental Europe during 
the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. 

4. Political and Constitutional History of England. Open to 
Sophomores. Professor Payne. 

5, 6. Political and Constitutional History of the United States. 
Open to Juniors and Seniors. Professor McPherson. 

8, 9. The French Revolution and Napoleonic Wars, and Europe in 
the Nineteenth Century. Open to Juniors and Seniors. Professor 
Payne. 

10. History of the South. Open to Juniors and Seniors. Professor 
Brooks. 

11. Political Science. An introduction to the theory of Political 
Science, comprising a study of the origin, nature, function and or- 
ganization of the state. Three hours a week, first half-year. Senior 
course, but also optional for Juniors. Professor McPherson. 

12. American Government and Politics. An advanced, detailed 
study of the American system of government, federal, state, and 
local, including the organization and actual influence of political 
parties. Three hours a week, second half-year. Senior course, but 
also optional for Juniors. Professor McPherson. 

13. Industrial History of the United Sttaes. Professor Brooks. 

15. History of South America and South American Relations. 
Adjunct Professor Ramirez. 

HONORS AND PRIZES 

An annual scholarship of one hundred dollars is offered by the 
National Society for Broader Education to a Senior who meets cer- 
tain requirements. During the year, 1918-1919, this scholarship 
was held by Mr. Weyman Isaac Dooley, Jr., of Watkinsville, Georgia. 



THE SCHOOL OF COMMERCE 223 

THE ECONOMICS SOCIETY 

The students of the School are brought together for association 
and improvement in the Economics Society. The purpose of this 
organization is two fold: First, its object is to discuss and study cur- 
rent economic and business problems; and second, to invite men of 
experience along various lines of business endeavor to speak to the 
students. This society is not in lieu of the old line literary societies 
but in addition to them. 

EMPLOYMENT DURING SUMMER 

Students are advised to secure positions during the summer in 
the line of work in which they expect permanently to enter. Ar- 
rangements have been made with certain banks of the state accord- 
ing to which banking experience may be had. The remuneration for 
this work is determined by the applicant and the bank concerned. 
It is understood, however, that it will be sufficient at least to defray 
the expenses of the student while he is at work. This arrangement 
makes it possible for students to get excellent experience and offers 
the bank at the same time an opportunity to try out men with a 
view to permanent employment. 

PRACTICE WORK 

Each student is required, in addition to the regular prescribed 
work, to devote two hours a week to practice in writing and type- 
writing. Each graduate of the School of Commerce should, before 
graduation, be able to do reasonably rapid work with the type- 
writer. The object of the School is not primarily to train penmen 
and typists, but the ability to write plainly and rapidly and to use 
the typewriter is so important in business that practice in them is 
required. 

THE SECRETARLYL COURSE 

For the first time in its history, the University of Georgia will 
open its doors to women in September, 1919. For those women 
who desire to prepare themselves for secretarial positions, the 
School of Commerce will offer appropriate courses. The degree of 
B.S. in Commerce will be conferred upon the completion of the four 
years work. The first two years of the Secretarial Course will be 
practically identical with that outlined for men. The first two years 
will be given up largely to general subjects; the last two to special- 
ized work. 

EXPENSES 

For expenses, see the general catalog of the University. 

Any further information may be had by writing: 

HOWARD DOUGLAS DOZIER, 

Athens, Georgia. 



224 UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 



THE GRADUATE SCHOOL 



D. C. BARROW, LL.D., Chancellor of the University. 
W. H. BOCOCK, LL.D., Dean of the Graduate School. 

THE COMMITTEE OX GRADUATE COURSES 

THE DEAN OF THE GRADUATE SCHOOL, Chairman. 

C. M. SNELLING, Sc.D., President of Franklin College. 

A. M. SOULE, Sc.D., President of the College of Agriculture and the 

Mechanic Arts. 
J. R. FAIN, B.S., Professor of Agronomy. 

J. LUSTRAT, Bach, es Lettres, Professor of Romance Languages. 
J. H. T. McPHERSON, Ph.D., Professor of History. 
R. E. PARK, Litt.D., Professor of English. 

THE FACULTY 

DAVID CRENSHAW BARROW, LLjD., Chancellor. 

JAMES BERTHOLD BERRY, B.S.F., M.S., Professor of Forestry. 

HOMER VAN VALKENBURGH BLACK, Ph.D., Associate Professor 
of Chemistry. 

WILLIS HENRY BOCOCK, A.M., LL.D., Milledge Professor of An- 
cient Languages. 

ROBERT PRESTON BROOKS, Ph.D., DeRenne Professor of Geor- 
gia History. ' 

GEORGE ARTHUR CRABB, B.S.A., Junior Professor of Agronomy. 

AUSTIN SOUTHWICK EDWARDS, Ph.D., Associate Professor of 
Psychology. 

JOHN RICHARD FAIN, B.S., Professor of Agronomy. 

CORNELIUS JACOB HEATWOLE, M.S., Professor of Education. 

LINVILLE LAUREiNTINE HENDREN, Ph.D., Professor of Physics 
and Astronomy. 

WILLIAM DAVIS HOOPER, A.M., Professor of Latin. 

MILTON PRESTON JARNIGAN, B.S.A., Professor of Animal Hus- 
bandry. 

JOSEPH LUSTRAT, Bach, es Lett., Professor of Romance Lan- 
guages. 

THOMAS HUBBARD McHATTON, Sc.D., Professor of Horticulture. 

JOHN HANSON THOMAS McPHERSON, Ph.D., Professor of His- 
tory and Political Science. 

ROBERT LIGON McWHORTER, A.M., Adjunct Professor of Latin 
and Greek. 

JOHN MORRIS, A.M., Professor of Germanic Languages. 

ROBERT EMORY PARK, A.M., Litt.D., Professor of English. 

WILLIAM OSCAR PAYNE, A.M., Associate Professor of History and 
Political Science. 



THE GRADUATE SCHOOL 225 

ROBERT SPENCER POND, Ph.D., Adjunct Professor of Mathe- 
matics. 

JOHN MOORE READE, Ph.D., Professor of Botany. 

STEADMAN VINCENT SANFORD, A.B., Litt.D., Professor of the 
English Language. 

LAFAYETTE MILES SHEFFER, B.S., Junior Professor of Voca- 
tional Education. 

ROSWELL POWELL STEPHENS, Ph.D., Associate Professor of 
Mathematics. 

CHARLES MORTON STRAHAN, C. and M.E., Sc.D., Professor of 
Civil Engineering. 

ROOSEVELT PRUYN WALKER, M.A., Adjunct Professor of Eng- 
lish. 

JOHN TAYLOR WHEELER, B.S., Professor of Vocational Educa- 
tion. 

HENRY CLAY WHITE, Ph.D., Sc.D., D.C.L., LL.D., Professor of 
Chemistry, and Terrell Professor of Agricultural Chemistry. 

THOMAS JACKSON WOOFTER, Ph.D., Professor of Philosophy and 
Education. 

WILLIAM ARCHER WORSHAM, JR., A.M., Professor of Agricul- 
tural Chemistry. 



226 UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 



CALENDAR, 1919-1920 

1919: 

January — Reports from professors who conducted Graduate Courses 
in the Summer School of 1918. 

May lst-^Last day on which theses may be handed in to professors. 

May 15th — Last day on which theses may be handed by professors 
to the dean. 

May 25th — Last day on which reports may be made on written ex- 
aminations of minor courses. 

June 1st — Last day on which reports may be made on written ex- 
aminations of major courses. 

June 18th — Commencement Day. Conferring of Degrees. 

June 30th — The Summer School opens. 

August 2nd — Close of Summer School. 

September 17 — Opening of the 120th annual session. 

November 1st — Last day on which a candidate's programme of stud- 
ies may be handed to the dean. 

1920: 
January — Reports from professors who conducted Graduate courses 
in the Summer School of 1919. 



THE GRADUATE SCHOOL 227 

HISTORICAL 

Although the first statutes of the University contemplated resident 
graduate students,* it was the custom here (as it was elsewhere, 
and perhaps still is in some universities) to confer the degree of Mas- 
ter of Arts upon any Bachelor of Arts of good character who, three 
years or more after graduation, should formally apply for the degree, 
and pay a fee therefor. f In 1868 a course of study was laid down 
which candidates for the Master's degree were to pursue. From 
1869 until 1890 the regulations required the candidate successfully 
to complete the most advanced course in each of the academic (non- 
professional) schools. In 1892 the requirements for the degrees 
became what they have since substantially remained; slight modifi- 
cations have been made from time to time. 

In the Catalogue of 1872-73 the degree of Civil Engineer is adver- 
tised for the first time as a graduate degree, being based on the 
degree of Bachelor of Engineering. The degree of Civil and Mining 
Engineering was a still higher degree, based on both B.E. and C.E. 

The degree of Master of Science was first offered in 1890, M.S. in 
Agriculture in 1910,$ M.S. in Forestry in 1917. 

The graduate work of the University has been supervised by the 
Faculty, chiefly through its Committee on Graduate Courses. In 
1910 the work was set apart by the Board of Trustees as the Grad- 
uate School, with its own Dean. 

ADMISSION 

Admission to the Graduate School is granted to graduates of col- 
leges of good standing. Other persons of suitable age and attain- 
ments may also be admitted by special permission of the Committee 
on Graduate Courses. Admission to the Graduate School does not 
imply admission to candidacy for a degree. Application for admis- 
sion should be made by correspondence or at the office of the Dean. 

Should a student desire to take a graduate course for which his 
undergraduate work has not afforded sufficient preparation, he will 
be required to pursue the requisite studies. The professor who con- 
ducts a graduate course undertakes to see that every student who 
is admitted to his course has satisfied the prerequisites or is satisfy- 
ing them according to his directions. 



♦"Masters and Bachelors of Arts, who shall signify to the President their 
purpose of residing at the College or In Athens with a' view of pursuing litera- 
ture, under his direction, and under the government of the College, and give 
a sufficient bond to the Board of Trustees for the payment of their quarters 
hills, shall he considered as resident Graduates and students of the College." 
Laws of the College of Georgia, 1803, Chap. II, See. IV. So also Code of Laws 
for the government of Franklin College. 1816, ('hap II. Se<-. XVI, 

fCode of 1803, Chap. XII, Sees. II and IV. Code of 1810, Chap. II. Sec XVI, 
and Chap. VIII. Sees. II and IV. 

tThe degree of Master of Agrieulture had been offered from 1S76 to 1S79. 



228 UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

DEOREES 

The degrees conferred in the Graduate School are Master of Arts, 
Master of Science, Civil Engineer, Master of Science in Agriculture, 
Master of Science in Forestry. 

Candidates must have received a baccalaureate degree from this 
or some other institution of reputable standing, and must pursue 
here and complete satisfactorily a major and two minor courses. 

The programme of study must not include any course that forms 
a part of the candidate's programme of study or of his curriculum 
for any other degree conferred or to be conferred here; it should be 
submitted early in the session (not later than November 1st,) to the 
Dean on Graduate Courses and of the Faculty. 

Candidates are expected to show correctness and good taste in 
their English, hoth oral and written.* 

A thesis or essay required in connection with a graduate course 
must show independence of judgment in the treatment of some 
definite problem from the sources. A bibliography must be added 
covering all literature used, and specific acknowledgments made. 
Assignment of subject must be made to the candidate and reported 
to the Dean of the Graduate School not later than January 1st, and 
the thesis must be handed to the professor not later than May 1st, 
and by him to the Dean of the Graduate School not later than May 
15th. If the thesis be approved by the professor and by the Faculty, 
a bound copy must be delivered before the second Wednesday in June 
to the Dean of the Graduate School for deposit in the Library. 

After the professors under whom the candidate has pursued an 
approved programme of study have reported in writing to the Dean 
that he has satisfactorily pursued the required courses and has 
passed written examinations upon them, he will be orally examined 
by a committee of the Faculty. If the course has included a thesis, 
the oral examination will not be held until the committee appointed 
to examine the thesis has made a favorable report to the Dean. Re- 
ports of written examinations on minor courses must be made not 
later than three weeks before Commencement Sunday, and reports 
on major courses not later than two weeks before Commencement 
Sunday. In making reports the professor will transmit a copy of 
the written examination (questions and candidate's papers) for the 
use of the examining committee of the Faculty. This committee 
is appointed by the Chancellor and consists of not less than five 
members of the Faculty. All other members of the Faculty are 
invited to attend the examination. After the professor who has 
given the course has finished his questioning, an equal amount of 



"Any Student who shows notable weakness in English, either oral or written, 
in his work in any course in the University of Georgia, shall, at the request of 
any instructor, he required to do spechil work under the direction of the de- 
partment of English.' 1 Faculty Minutes, Sept. 20th, 1915. 



THE GRADUATE SCHOOL 22 9 

time, or more, will be at the disposal of the other members of the 
committee. 

Examinations, both oral and written, on a major course may go 
outside of the formal limits of the course and include fundamental 
matters that may have been treated in undergraduate courses. This 
regulation applies also, though in a less degree, to examinations on 
minor courses. Where a graduate minor is based on an advanced 
undergraduate course, the student may at the option of the instruc- 
tor take the undergraduate examination for each term, but it is 
expected that each graduate course shall be subject to one written 
examination covering the entire course. 

Master of Arts. Prerequisite degree: Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor 
of Science. The major course and at least one minor must be select- 
ed from the following departments of study: Philosophy, Educa- 
tion, History, Political Science, Economics, Rhetoric, English Liter- 
ature, the English Language, German, Latin, Greek, Romance Lan- 
guages, Mathematics. 

Master of Science. Prerequisite degree: Bachelor of Science or 
Bachelor of Arts. The major course and at least one minor must 
be selected from the following departments of study: Mathematics, 
Chemistry, Geology, Physics, Astronomy, Physiology, Zoology, Bot- 
any, Psychology. 

Civil Engineer. Prerequisite degree: Bachelor of Science in Civil 
Engineering or Bachelor of Science in Electrical Engineering. The 
major course must be in the department of Civil Engineering and 
the minors may be from minor graduate courses, or certain under- 
graduate courses, offered in other departments of the University. 
The choice of minors is subject to the approval of the Professor of 
Civil Engineering. 

Master of Science in Agriculture. A reputable baccalaureate de- 
gree prerequisite. The major and at least one minor must be select- 
ed from courses offered in the College of Agriculture. One minor 
may be chosen from graduate courses offered in other departments 
of the University or from certain undergraduate courses. The choice 
of courses is subject to the approval of the professor in charge of 
the department in which the major course is selected. 

Master of Science in Forestry. Prerequisite degree: Bachelor of 
Science in Forestry or Forest Engineer. The major course must be 
in Forestry; one minor may be selected from any department of the 
College of Agriculture; and one minor from any department or col- 
lege of the University, but the choice of courses is subject to the 
approval of the professor of Forestry. 

COURSES 1919-1920 

Explanation. Courses of instruction are classed as majors or 
minors according to the estimated amount of work required, and 



230 UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

to some extent according to the nature of the subject. A major 
course will require half of the work of a candidate for the Master's 
degree in residence for one year. A minor course will require a 
quarter of his time. A major course is based upon and presupposes 
the Senior or most advanced undergraduate course of a Department. 
No student will be admitted to a major course who has not had at 
least two years of undergraduate work in the same or a closely re- 
lated subject. A minor course is also generally based upon the 
most advanced undergraduate course of a department, but extensions 
of certain advanced undergraduate courses may also be rated as 
minor graduate courses. No student, however, will be admitted to 
a graduate minor unless he has had at least one year of under- 
graduate work in the same subject. A candidate for a degree will 
not be permitted, as a rule, to offer more than one minor that is 
not based upon the most advanced undergraduate course of a Depart- 
ment. All courses are submitted for approval and rating to the 
Committee on Graduate Courses, and are finally passed upon by the 
Faculty. 

GREEK 

a. Selections from Homer, Herodotus, the dramatists, Thucydides, 
Plato, and Demosthenes. 

1). Brief introduction to Historical Grammar. Classical Greek 
Syntax: Gildersleeve, and other works. Oral and written exercises 
in Attic Greek. Recitation of the more familiar metres. Readings 
in the History of Greece. Three lectures per week. Major. Pro- 
fessor Bocock and Adjunct Professor McWhorter. 

LATIN 

1. A major course, designed to supplement the undergraduate 
courses, and therefore somewhat general in nature. It comprises 
the reading of considerable portions of Catullus, Lucretius, Juvenal, 
Seneca, and the Younger Pliny, with readings in Dill, Mommsen, 
and Ferrero; a review of grammar, from the comparative and histor- 
ical point of view; exercises in Latin writing; reading in the history 
of the literature, and an introduction to epigraphy and palaeography. 
Four hours per week. Professor Hooper and Adjunct Professor Mc- 
Whorter. 

2. A minor course in the Roman drama, consisting of lectures on 
the subject, and reading of a number of representative plays of 
Platus, Terence, and Seneca. Especial attention is paid to the re- 
lationship of the Roman drama to the Greek drama, on the one hand, 
and the English drama on the other. Prerequisite: Latin 4. Two 
hours per week. Professor Hooper. 



THE GRADUATE SCHOOL 231 

FRENCH 

lie Roman en France dans la deuxieme partie du XIX Siecle. 

Lectures in French. Reading of works by Flaubert, Fueillet, 
Cherbuliez, Fromentin, les de Goncourt, Daudet, Loti, Zola, de 
Maupassant, Bourget, Rod, Margueritte, Rosny, Prevot, Barres, 
France, Fabre, Theuriet, etc. Prerequisite: French 2 or 2a. Two 
hours per week. Professor Lustrat. 

GERMAN 

1. The German Classics. Selections from the following: Goethe: 
Werther, Faust I, Poems, Egmont, Iphigenie, Wilhelm Meister. 
Schiller: Kabale und Liebe, Fiesco, Don Carlos, Jungfrau von Or- 
leans, Wallenstein, Wilhelm Tell, Poems. Lessing: Emilia Galotti, 
Minna von Barnhelm, Nathan der Weise, Hamburgische Dramaturgie 
Laokoon, Controversial Writings. 

Commentaries: Bellermann, Minor, Hettner, Braun, Bulthaupt, 
Fischer. 

Major. About eleven hundred pages. Four conferences weekly. 
Professor Morris. 

2. A minor course in the German Classics. About seven hundred 
pages. Prerequisite: German 2 or 2a. Two conferences weekly. 
Professor Morris. 

3. German Composition. Practice in speaking and writing Ger- 
man. Prerequisite: German 2a or 2. Two hours per week. Minor. 
Professor Morris. 

ENGLISH 

1. Old and Middle English, Phonology, Inflections and Transla- 
tion. Text-books: Smith's Old English Grammar, Chaucer's Pro- 
logue and Knight's Tale, with lectures based on Morris's "Organic 
History of English Words," Part I (K. J. Triibner), Part II (Ms.). 
Three hours per week, first and second terms. Minor. Professor 
Morris. 

2. Historical English Syntax: a. General Linguistic development. 
b. The Syntax of Old, Middle, and Modern English. 

Prerequisite: Course 1 or the equivalent. 

Maetzner, English Grammar, Volumes II and III; Kellner, His- 
torical English Syntax; Emerson. English Language; Whitney, Life 
and Growth of Language; Xesfield, Historical English; Jespersen, 
Modern English Grammar; Horn, Historische neuenglische Gram- 
matik. 

Three hours per week, second and third terms. Minor. Professor 
Sanford. 

Note: — Courses 1 and 2 may be taken together as a major, or 
Course 2 may be taken with 4 or 5 to form a major. 

3. Composition, Poetics, Theories of Style. Butcher's Aristotle's 



232 UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

Theory of Poetry and Fine Art; Cooper's Theories of Style; Lessing's 
Laokoon. Papers will be required dealing with specific critical prob- 
lems suggested by the study of Aristotle's Poetics, a number of 
essays on theories of style, and other critical essays and apprecia- 
tions. Prerequisite: Two elective undergraduate courses in English 
Literature. Two hours per week. Minor. Adjunct Professor Walker. 

4. The English Drama. A. From the beginning to the death of 
Elizabeth (1603). Based on "Ward's English Dramatic Literature; 
Brooke's Tudor Drama; Bate's English Religious Drama; Manley's 
Specimens of the Pre-Shakespearean Drama. Plays from Udall, 
Stevenson, Sackville and Norton, Kyd, Lyly, Peele, Greene, Nash, 
Marlowe, Shakespeare, Jonson, and others. A study will be made of 
the development of the English Language and of the development 
of dramatic technique. Professor Park. 

B. From the death of Elizabeth to the closing of the Theatres 

(1642). Based on Ward's English Dramatic Literature; Schelling's 
English Drama; Collier's Annals of the English Stage; and plays 
selected from Shakespeare, Jonson, Beaumont and Fletcher, Web- 
ster, Massinger, Middleton, Dekker, Day, Chapman, Shirley, and 
others. A study will be made of the syntax of the language of 
Elizabeth's time in comparison with modern English. Professor San- 
ford. 

C. From the closing of the theatres to the present time. Based on 
Schelling's English Drama; Nettleton's English Drama of the Res- 
toration and Eighteenth Century; Chandler's Modern Drama; plays 
from Dryden, Congreve, Wycherly, Shadwell, Addison, Sheridan, 
Goldsmith, Shelley, Browning, Tennyson, Lytton, Phillips, Shaw, 
Galsworthy, Jones, Pinero, and others. Frequent critical papers will 
be required. Adjunct Professor Walker. 

Four hours per week. Major. A and B, or B and C, with some 
curtailment, may be taken as a minor. 

5. The English Novel; History and Technique. The course in- 
cludes the reading of twenty-seven works of prose fiction from Sir 
Thomas Malory to Kipling. 

Text-Books: J. G. Dunlop's History of Prose Fiction; F. M. War- 
ren's History of the Novel previous to the 17th Century; Bliss 
Perry's Art of Prose Fiction. And for reference: Jusserand's Eng- 
lish Novel in the time of Shakespeare; Cross's Development of the 
English Novel; George Saintsbury's English Novel; Walter Raleigh's 
English Novel. 

Prerequisite: English 3-4, or the equivalent. Two hours per week. 
Minor. Professor Sanford. 

Note: — A minor from Course 4 with 5 may be taken as a major. 



THE GRADUATE SCHOOL 233 

HISTORY 

1. The English Constitution to the Reign of Henry VI. A course 
comprising a thorough study of the foundations of Anglo-Saxon in- 
stitutions, and their development through the medieval. It is based 
upon Stubbs's Constitutional History of England. Minor. Three 
hours a week, first half-year. Associate Professor Payne. 

2. The English Constitution since the Reign of Henry VI. A 
course based upon the constitutional histories of Hallam and May, 
and covering the later phases of the development of English institu- 
tions. Three hours a week, second half-year. Minor. Associate 
Professor Payne. 

Courses 1 and 2 are together rated as a major. Each includes 
parallel reading, tested by frequent examinations. 

3. Civil War and Reconstruction. An extension of History 13. 
Graduate students will take this course with the undergraduate 
class and will be required, in addition to meeting the requirements 
of History 13, to prepare a thesis from the original sources, so far 
as they are available. 

In addition to attending History 13, there will be one conference 
hour weekly for instruction in historical method and guidance in 
the preparation of the thesis. Minor. Professor Brooks. 

Phelps-Stokes Fellowship. The study and research in connection 
with the preparation of the annual Phelps-Stokes Study (see page 
44), has been rated as a major course for the Master of Arts degree. 

4. The French Revolution and Napoleon I. (Not offered in years 
in which Courses 1-2 are given). An advanced course in the topical 
study of European History from 1789 to 1815, based on some of the 
standard authorities for this period. Emphasis is placed upon the 
constitutional experiments of the French Revolution, and the prob- 
lems raised by the Napoleonic wars. 

Prerequisites: Two college years of History, and in addition there- 
to History 8-9 or its equivalent. 

Conferences two hours per week. Minor. Associate Professor Payne. 

PHILOSOPHY 

Advanced History of Philosophy (Philosophy 26). 1. An intro- 
duction to the problems of philosophy. 2. A survey of the three 
general periods of the history of philosophy with further study of 
the modern fields. 3. Selected readings in philosophical classics, such 
as Plato, Republic; Marcus Aurelius, Meditations; Bacon, Advance- 
ment of Learning; Darwin, Origin of Species; Spencer, First Prin- 
ciples; James, Pragmatism, or others as chosen each year 

Prerequisite: Philosophy 4 or its equivalent. Two conferences a 
week and library reading. Minor. Professor Woofter. 

PSYCHOLOGY 

1. Systematic Psychology (Psychology 7). An advanced course in 
systematic and experimental psychology intended as a detailed study 



234 UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

of theoretical discussions and original investigations regarding a 
single special topic, such as Sensations, Feelings, Attention, Associa- 
tion, Memory, etc., and as an introduction to the use of quantitative 
methods applicable to this topic. Parallel reading of one general 
systematic treatise by one of the following authors: Wundt, Ebbing- 
haus, James, Titchener, Munsterberg, or Ladd, will be required as 
a general basis of the work. 

Prerequisite: Psychology 1-2 and 6. 

Major. Two conferences and four hours experimental work 
weekly. 

Minor. One conference and two hours laboratory work weekly. 
Associate Professor Edivards. 

2. Advanced Educational Psychology (Psychology 11). As a rule 
this course will refer mainly to teaching. Texts: Miinsterberg's 
Psychology and the Teacher; K}irkpatriek, Genetic Psychology; 
Thorndyke, Educational Psychology; Whipple, Manual of Mental and 
Physical Tests. Comparative Psychology: Washburn, The Animal 
Mind; Yerkes, Animal Behavior; Thorndike, Animal Intelligence. 
Abnormal Psychology; Stooring, Mental Pathology; Ribot, Diseases 
of Personality. 

Prerequisites: Psychology 1-2 and 6. Major. Two conferences 
a week, the work, including laboratory, equivalent to one-half year's 
graduate study. Minor: One conference a week, the work, including 
laboratory, equivalent to one-fourth of a year's graduate study. 
Associate Professor Edwards. 

Comparative Psychology (Psychology 12). Not offered for 1919- 
1920. 

SOCIOLOGY 
4. Advanced Sociology (Education 17). An advanced course in 
the study of constructive progress in society. 

a. Historical and theoretical sociology. The story of the evolu- 
tion of society and the history of civilization. Primitive society; 
civilization; modern development: Tylor, Morgan, Sumner, Boas, 
Giddings, and others. 

h. Social theories. The study of the principal theories of society; 
Comte, Spencer, Montesquieu, Buckle, Bagehot, Tarde, Giddings, and 
others. 

c. Educational Sociology. Brief historical study of Education. 
The Sociological in Education: Plato, Aristotle, Pestalozzi, Herbart, 
Froebel, Rousseau, Spencer (in summary text), Ward, Hall, and 
others. 

d. Modern Applied Sociology and Education. One practical prob- 
lem in the field selected for research. 

c. A thesis is required. 
Prerequisite: Education 5-6. 



THE GRADUATE SCHOOL 235 

EDUCATION 

1. Education in the United States (Education 24). 
In the main this course is historical: 

1. Early transplantings from Europe. 2. Developments more dis- 
tinctly American. 3. Evolution of various phases of education; ele- 
mentary, secondary, higher, technical, professional, and special. 
4. Influences of Rousseau, Pestalozzi, Froebel, Herbart, Spencer, and 
others. 5. Prominent American leaders. 6. Development of admin- 
istration and supervision. 7. Educational philanthropies. 8. Re- 
organization and expansion of education demanded by modern con- 
ditions, with especial attention to the South. Coordination of state, 
county, national, and private endeavor. 

Prerequisite: Education 1, or equivalent. 
Three hours per week. Major. Professor Woofter. 

2. Public School Administration. 1. The Administration of Edu- 
cation in the Nation; the probable functions of the United States 
Government. 2. State and County Educational Administration. Cub- 
berly's State and County Reorganization, Cubberly and Elliott's 
Source Book of State and County School Administration; various 
pamphlets and reports from States and from the United States Bu- 
reau of Education. 3. Educational Administration in Cities and 
Towns. Perry's Management of a City School; Diffenbaugh's School 
Administration in the Smaller Cities. There will be some other 
reading assigned, including reports of recent educational surveys 
(State of Vermont, City of Portland, etc.). 

Prerequisite: Education 1. Two hours a week. Minor. Professor 
Woofter. 

3. Problems of Rural Life and Education (Education 8). 

a. The Principles of Rural Sociology. A study of rural life and 
society: Bailey, Carver, Gillette, Foght, and others, with local stud- 
ies. 

h. Fundamentals of Rural Progress. A constructive programme 
of rural progress. An original outline and programme will be fol- 
lowed and developed. 

c. Practical problems. An important problem of rural life or the 
rural school will be selected for research and application of princi- 
ples and theories studied. 

Prerequisite: Education 5-6. 

Two hours a week throughout the year, and in addition a seminar 
during the last term. 

4. Advanced Educational Psychology (Psychology 11). Major or 
minor. See Graduate Psychology 2. Associate Professor Edwards. 

MATHEMATICS 

Of the following courses the requirement for a major will be two 
lectures per week in each of any three, together with an original 



7 36 UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

paper covering an investigation of some related topic to be assigned 
by the department. Two of the courses constitute a minor. 

Prerequisite: Mathematics 5. (Advanced Calculus). Associate 
Professor Stephens and Adjunct Professor Pond. 

1. Differential Equations. An elementary course in ordinary and 
partial differential equations, with special reference to those equa- 
tions occurring in the physical sciences. Text: Cohen or Murray. 

2. Vector Analysis. An elementary course in vectors which de- 
velops a system of coordinates and illustrates their use in certain 
mathematical and physical problems. Reference text: Coffin. 

3. Projective Geometry. A course in pure geometry based upon 
one of the following texts with the others as references: Holgate's 
Reye, Cremona, Veblen and Young. 

4. Theoretical Mechanics. • An analytical treatment of certain 
problems in statics and dynamics with the aid of the Calculus. Many 
problems will be used. Text: Ziwet and Field or Jeans. 

5. Theory of Functions. An introductory course to the theory of 
functions of a real and a complex variable. Reference works: Hark- 
ness and Morley, Durege, Goursat. 

6. Analytical Geometry. An advanced course based on Salmon or 
other text of a similar character. 

PHYSICS 

(1) Advanced Electricity, Discharge of Electricity Through Gases 
and Radioactivity. An extension of Physics 6, the extension to con- 
sist of two hours per week of laboratory work and one hour per week 
of laboratory conference. The laboratory work will be mainly in the 
field of the discharge of electricity through gases and radioactivity. 
Prerequisites: the equivalent of Physics 4 and 5, Mathematics 5, 
Chemistry 2 and 2a as given in the University of Georgia. Minor. 
Professor Hendren. 

(2) The Electron Theory. A study of the fundamental principles 
and phenomena of Electricity, Light, Heat, Radioactivity and Radia- 
tion according to the modern electron theory. Use will be made of 
Campbell's Electrical Theory, Thompson's Conduction of Electricity 
through Gases, McClung's Discharge of Electricity through Gases, 
and Rutherford's Radioactivity. 

Prerequisites: The equivalent of Physics 4, 5 and 6, Mathe- 
matics 5, 7 and 9, and Chemistry 2 and 2a. Physics 6 and Mathe- 
matics 7 and 9 may be taken as parallel courses. 

Two hours of lectures and recitations, one hour of laboratory con- 
ference, and three hours of laboratory work weekly. Major. Pro- 
fessor Hendren. 



THE GRADUATE SCHOOL 237 

CHEMISTRY 

Opportunity is offered to a limited number of qualified students 
to pursue advanced work in Chemistry. The minimum qualification 
is satisfactory completion of undergraduate courses 2 and 8 in the 
department of Chemistry, or their equivalent. The nature of the 
advanced work will be determined by individual conference. 

BOTANY 

1. Eumycetes. A minor study. Undergraduate Course 6 with 
extension of laboratory work and the critical study of selected read- 
ings. 

Prerequisite: One suitable undergraduate course in Botany. Pro- 
fessor Beade. 

2. Physiology. A minor study. Undergraduate Course 9 with 
extension of laboratory work and the critical study of Jost's Lectures 
on Plant Physiology. 

Prerequisite: One suitable undergraduate course in Botany. Pro- 
fessor Beade. 

3. Thallophytes. A major study. A general survey of the thal- 
lophyte groups and problems. Laboratory work and the critical 
study of selected readings. 

Prerequisites: Two suitable undergraduate courses in Botany. 
Professor Beade. 

CIVIL ENGINEERING 

Baker's Masonry Construction. Irrigation, based on Wilson, New- 
ell. Land Drainage, Elliott, and United States Irrigation Papers. 
Reinforced Concrete, Turneaure, Taylor and Thompson. Hydraulics, 
Russell, Merriman. Lectures. Various essays and designs are re- 
quired of the students. Six hours per week. Major. Professor 
Strahan. 

AGRONOMY 

1. Soil Types, a. A general study of the origin and soil formation 
of a given area. 

b. An investigation of the physical properties of some of the soil 
types within the area. 

c. F'ield or pot work with some of the soil types. 
Prerequisite: Agronomy 5, 6 and 7. 

Three conferences per week and at least three laboratory periods. 
l*rofessors Fain and Crabb. 

2. Farm Crops. The particular crop studied in this course, which 
may be given either as a major or a minor, varies from year to year. 

Prerequisites: Agronomy 4 or 14, depending on the particular 
crop studied. Professors Fain and Past. 

3. Physical Properties of Soils. Either a general study of physical 



2 38 UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

properties of soils or an investigation of particular problems. Minor. 
Professors Fain and Crabb. 

4. Fertilizers. 1. A general study of the principles involved in 
the use of fertilizers and the methods of conducting experiments. 
2. Specific problems to be worked out either in greenhouse or field. 

Prerequisites: Agronomy 5, 6 and 10. Two conferences per 
week. Minor. Professors Fain and Crabb. 

Note: — Courses 3 and 4 may be taken together as a major course. 

5. Soil Fertility. (1) The consideration of the requirements of 
crop production. (2) An investigation in laboratory, greenhouse or 
field of some definite problem. 

Prerequisites: Agronomy 5, 6 and 9. 

One conference and two laboratory periods per week. Minor. 
Professors Fain and Crabb. 

6. Experimental Plant Breeding. Only work of a technical na- 
ture is assigned and is always some specific problem in breeding, 
and, in most instances, requires at least two years to complete. By 
using the greenhouse, three generations of plants can be grown dur- 
ing this time. Details of the work done together with the results 
obtained must be reported in a thesis when the work is completed. 

The class work is based on Mendel's Principles of Heredity by 
Bateson and the 1911 edition by Punnett; Hugo DeVries's Plant 
Breeding, The Mutation Theory, and Species and Varieties, their 
Origin by Mutation. 

Some of the required reading: Surival of the Unlike, L. H. Bai- 
ley; Plant Breeding, Plants and Animals Under Domestication, 
Chas. Darwin; Genetics, Walter; Modes of Research in Genetics, 
Pearl. 

Minor. Two conferences and laboratory period per week. Pro- 
fessor Rast. 

AGRICULTURAL CHEMISTRY 

1. Agricultural Chemical Analysis. This course will be based on 
the work offered Seniors and will be limited to the type of soils of 
the state. Analysis will be made of at least five types as unlike as 
can be obtained, and a special study will be made of the nature and 
character of the organic matter contained. The geological forma- 
tion in the localities in which these soils are found will be studied. 

Work will be done towards improving a few of the methods by 
which it is now difficult to duplicate results, such as that for de- 
termining humus. 

Parallel reading and an acquaintance with work being carried on 
in other laboratories will be required. This reading will be Stock- 
bridge's Rocks and Soils; Hopkins's Fertility; Hall's Soils; Hil- 
gard's Soils, and the Bulletins bearing on the subject. 



THE GRADUATE SCHOOL 239 

Wiley's Principles and Practice of Agricultural Analysis, Vol. 1, 
and Bulletin No. 10 7, Official and Provisional Methods of Analysis, 
will be used as reference books. 

Three conference hours and six laboratory periods per week. 
Major. Professor Morsham. 

2. An extension of Agricultural Chemistry 4, for students who 
have had Agricultural Chemistry 4, and wish to pursue the work 
exclusively with soils, fertilizers, or 'food and feed stuffs. This will 
be left partially optional with the student. Students working with 
soils will be required to make three complete analyses of soils. 
Those working with fertilizers will be required to make an analysis 
of fifteen complete and ten incomplete fertilizers. Those working 
with feeds and foods will be required to make twenty-five analyses. 

The same reference books as are used in Course 1, with the addi- 
tion of Vol. II of Wiley's Principles and Practice of Agricultural 
Analysis, and Leach's Food Inspection and Analysis, will be used in 
this course. 

Four hours per week. Minor. Professor ^Yorsham. 

HORTICULTURE 

1. Junior courses Nos. 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, and 9; with selected reading 
from the following: The American Fruit Culturist, Thomas; Fruit 
and Fruit Trees of America, Downing; Plums and Plum Culture, 
Waugh; Plant Diseases, Duggar; The Small Fruit Culturist, Fuller; 
Barry's Fruit Garden, Journals, Bulletins, etc. 

Four hours per week and laboratory work. Minor. Professor 
MvHatton. 

2. Pomology. This course is open to students who have special- 
ized in Horticulture, and is based upon Bailey's Evolution of our 
Native Fruits and The Survival of the Unlike. 

Selected reading from the following, to be mainly along the lines 
of origins of varieties of plants and the histories of various fruits; 
Plant Breeding, Bailey; Species and Varieties, their Origin and 
Mutation, DeVries; Animals and Plants Under Domestication, Dar- 
win; Origin of Species, Darwin; Heredity, Thompson; Mendelism, 
Punnett; Fruits and Fruit Trees of America, Downing; American 
Fruits and Their Culture, Hume; The Grapes of New York, Hedrick; 
Foundations of American Grape Culture, Munson; The Apples of 
New York, Beach; Journals, Bulletins, etc. 

Three conference hours or equivalent in laboratory periods. Minor. 
Professor McHatton. 

3. Pomology. Course 2, with the addition of a thesis on some hor- 
ticultural subject. The thesis is to call for not less than three lab- 
oratory periods per week and is to consist of research work to be 



240 UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

chosen by the student with the assistance of the instructor. Major. 
Professor McHatton. 

4. Landscape Gardening. (This course is open to students who 
have made a specialty of Horticulture). The history of the various 
schools of landscape art, a study of the fundamental principles in- 
volved, and the adaptability of the various types form the basis of 
the course. Selected readings from the following: Landscape Gar- 
dening, Downing; Landscape Gardening Studies, Parsons; How to 
Lay Out Suburban Home Grounds, Kellaway; Landscape Gardening, 
Kemp; English Pleasure Gardens, Nichols; American Gardens, Low- 
ell; Art and Craft of Garden Making, Mawson; Cottage Gardens, 
Thornger; Landscape Beautiful, Waugh; Town Planting, Webster; 
Landscape in History, Geike; and other publications. A thesis on 
some definite Georgia landscape problem will be required. 

Two conference hours and four laboratory periods per week. 
Major. Professor McHatton. 

ANIMAL HUSBANDRY 

1. Feeding Problems. This course will include a study of feeding 
stuffs most generally available under cotton belt conditions and their 
adaptation to the various classes of farm animals. Feeding tests 
with a sufficient number of animals to give reliable results and cov- 
ering periods of from 90 to 150 days will be required. Accurate and 
detailed records of kind and amounts of feed will be kept together 
with records of production. 

Prerequisite: Undergraduate Course 9, and Veterinary Medicine 
3, 4 (Animal Physiology). 

Parallel reading: Armsby's Principles of Animal Nutrition; Hen- 
ry's Feeds and Feeding; Sinclair's Heavy Horses; Gay's Productive 
Horse Husbandry; Wing's Modern Sheep Breeding and Manage- 
ment; Mumford's Beef Production; State and Government Bulletins. 
Two conferences per week and sufficient time in the laboratory to 
conduct feeding tests. Minor. Professor Jarnagin. 

2. Swine Production. This course is a continuation of undergrad- 
uate Course 6. Students will be required to conduct feeding experi- 
ments with swine. Methods of breeding, feeding and management 
will be studied. 

Prerequisites: Undergraduate Courses 8 and 9, and Veterinary 
Medicine 3, 4 (Animal Physiology). 

Parallel reading: Coburn's Swine Industry; Dietrich's Swine; 
Dawson's Hog Book; College Experiment Station, and Government 
bulletins. Two conferences per week and sufficient time in labora- 
tory to conduct feeding test and tabulate results. Minor. Professor 
Jarnagin. 



THE GRADUATE SCHOOL 241 

FORESTRY 

The following courses have been approved by the Faculty and for 
any one year selections are to be made after consultation with the 
professor of Forestry: 

1. Silviculture. This work will be based on undergraduate course 
5. An investigation into the factors of site as they relate to the com- 
mercial production of forest products. In each case a specialized 
problem will be assigned. 

Parallel reading: Research Methods, Clements; Physiology and 
Ecology, Clements; Oecology of Plants, Warming; Lehrbuch der 
Forsteinrichtung, Weber; Files of Forest Quarterly and Proceed- 
ings of Society of American Foresters; Forest Service publications 
and special reports; Special reports, Forest Service Nurseries; Ger- 
mination of Forest Seedlings, Boerker. Emphasis will be placed on 
that portion of the assigned reading dealing with the specialized 
study. Problems suggested: 

a. The germination and development of forest seedlings as in- 
fluenced by the quality of site, from the commercial standpoint. . 

&. The formation of a yield table for a particular forest species, 
based upon quality of site. , 

c. Growth table for a particular forest species, based upon qual- 
ity of site. 

d. Quality increment in a particular forest species, based upon 
quality of site. 

Prerequisites: Botany 1 and Forestry 4 and 5. 

One consultation period per week and sufficient time (not less 
than half time for one year,) to complete the study. When the. 
study consists of a problem in the formation of yield tables not less 
than two months of field work will be required. Major. Processor 
Berry. 

2. Wood Technology. This work is based on the prerequisite 
undergraduate course 15, with the object of developing microscopic 
means of identification within the genera. The study will include 
an investigation into the variation in structure as affected by quality 
of site. 

Parallel reading: Identification of Woods, Records; Physical 
Properties of Woods, Records; Identification of Woods, Snow; Wood 
Identification in the Philippines, P. I. Forest Service; Special reports 
of investigations, Madison Laboratory; Forest Service Publications 
and Bulletins; Files of Forest Quarterly and Proceedings, Society of 
American Foresters. 

One consultation period and six laboratory periods per week. 
Major. Professor Berry. 

3. Forest By-ProductvS. This work will be based on the prerequi- 



242 UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

site undergraduate course 5 in Agricultural Chemistry. An investi- 
gative study into some one branch of the chemistry of forest by-pro- 
ducts; as the distillation of turpentine, the destructive distillation of 
wood, the fractional distillation of creosote, the production of ethyl 
alcohol from sawmill waste. 

Parallel reading: Industrial Chemistry for Students and Manu- 
facturers, Rogers and Aubert; Modern Industrial Chemistry, Bluck- 
er; Outlines of Industrial Chemistry, Thorp; Commercial Organic 
Analysis, Allen; Chemistry of Plant Products, Hess and Hill; Gen- 
eral Analysis, Allen; General and Industrial Chemistry Organic, 
Molinari; Bulletins, U. S. Forest Service, and Special Reports, Mad- 
ison Laboratory. 

Three conference hours and six laboratory periods per week. 
Professor Worsham. 

4. Dendrology. A specialized development of the prerequisite un- 
dergraduate course 4. A detailed study of minor characteristics in 
the identification of trees and shrubs, special emphasis being placed 
upon "winter" characteristics. The study will include the silvical 
as well as dendrological characteristics. Complete herbarium speci- 
mens will constitute a portion of the required report. 

Parallel Reading and Reference: Manual of Trees, Sargent; 
Trees, Rogers; North American Trees, Britton; Key to Trees, Col- 
lins and Preston; Studies in Trees, Levison; Key to Buds and Bark, 
Nebraska University; Pennsylvania Trees, Illick; Michigan Trees, 
University of Michigan; New Mexico Trees and Shrubs, Agri. Exper. 
Station; Minnesota Trees and Shrubs, Clements; Vermont Trees, 
University of Vermont; Texas Trees, University of Texas; Forest 
Service Bulletins and Circulars. 

Two lectures per week, field and laboratory work. Minor. Pro- 
fessor Berry. 

5. Wood Utilization. A specialized study into the methods of 
manufacture employed by an industry using wood as a raw material; 
involving an investigation of the machinery used, the class of labor, 
the efficiency of machinery and labor, the woods used, the possibility 
of substitute woods; methods of cost keeping. The study will be 
cooperative with the factory or factories studied and under the joint 
supervision of the College and the factory concerned. The results 
of the investigation will be embodied in a report. 

Parallel Reading and Reference: Lumber and Its Uses, Kellogg; 
Properties of Wood; Special reports, Madison Laboratory; Technical 
articles on wood manufacture, Files of Lumber Journals (Ameri- 
can Lumberman, Southern Lumberman, Woodworker, Lumber 
World, Timberman, Wood-turning, Dixie Woodworker, and others) ; 
Lumber Industry, Kellogg; Lumber Accounting, Jones; Forest Ser- 
vice Bulletins and Circulars; Shop Management, Taylor. 



THE GRADUATE S3H00L 243 

From six to twelve weeks will be spent in one or more factories 
under the joint supervision of College and Factory. Copies of the 
report will be sent to the Forest School and to the superintendents 
of the factories concerned. Minor. Professor Berry. 

AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION 

1. Problems in Vocational Teaching. Educational aims, educa- 
tional and sociological values; means of measuring values; educa- 
tional needs of the several vocational groups of society; school or- 
ganization to meet these needs, curricula; relations of school activi- 
ties and work activities; where vocational education can best be 
done; vocational methods; the vocational teacher. Readings: Bag- 
ley, Dewey, Snedden, Strayer, Eliot, Thorndyke, Davenport, Prossh, 
and other. Two hours a week. Minor. Professor Wheeler. 

2. Teacher-Training in Agriculture. Government agencies af- 
fecting the development of agricultural education in the United 
States; national and state legislation; types of schools affected; or- 
ganization and courses of study; organization and administration of 
teacher-training under the "National Vocational Education Act;" 
national and state policies, laws and plans for state supervision and 
teacher-training; historical review of the Federal Act. Report of 
National Committee on Vocational Education; Bulletins and Pro- 
ceedings of the National Society for Vocational Education; rulings 
of the Federal Board for Vocational Education; state laws for carry- 
ing out the provisions of the Federal Act. Three hours a week. 
Major. Professor Wheeler. 

EXPENSES 

Residents of Georgia pay no tuition fees. Students who are resi- 
dents of other states pay a tuition fee of $50.00 per annum. The 
following estimate of expenses for a student rooming in a dormitory 
and boarding at Denmark Hall includes all necessary items except 
clothing and railroad fare: 

Matriculation fee (paid on entrance) $ 10.00 

Library fee (paid on entrance) 5.00 

♦Board (monthly, in advance, $20.00) 180.00 

Furnishing room in dormitory (estimated) 14.00 

Laundry, (estimated at $1.50 per month) 13.50 

Room rent, lights and attendance, ($2.50 per month) 22.50 

Fuel, (estimated) 10.00 

Books and stationery, (estimated) 20.00 

Fee for Infirmary, etc., (see p. 42) 12.00 



$287.00 



♦Table board at Denmark Hall $16.00 a month in advance. 



244 UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

For laboratory fees in Chemistry, Zoology, Physiology, Botany, 
and Physics, see p. 43. 

GRADUATE COURSES IN THE SUMMER SCHOOL 

The University permits a graduate student, eligible to candidacy 
for a second degree, to secure the Master's degree upon the success- 
ful completion of graduate courses pursued during not less than 
three Summer Sessions. During the periods intervening between the 
Summer Sessions (and, if necessary, for the year following the third 
Summer Session) the candidate must continue his studies under the 
direction of the professors in charge of his several courses. In the 
case of each course thus given the professor submits to the Commit- 
tee on Graduate Courses .for their approval a definite statement of 
the work to be done by lectures and conferences and that to be done 
by the candidate in absentia. And this apportionment must be ap- 
proved by the University Faculty. 

A thesis is required by the Faculty in connection with each Major 
course offered in the Summer School. * 

A professor who has conducted a graduate course in a Summer 
Session reports at some time in the following January in writing to 
the Dean of the Graduate School concerning the progress of the stu- 
dents who are continuing their studies under his guidance, and this 
report is laid before the Committee on Graduate Courses. 

COURSES FOR 1919 

The right is reserved to withdraw any course for which there are 
not two or more applicants. In some cases a course may be given for 
only one applicant if the fee for the following summer session be 
paid in advance, or if the course is requested in the last summer of 
the student's candidacy. 

I. Latin. 1917, 1920. A Course in Roman Philosophy. The five books 
of Cicero's de Finibus Bonorum et Malorum, and the three books of the 
de Officiis supplemented by a reading of selected chapters in the 
history of philosophy treating of the leading schools of Greek 
thought and their influence on Roman philosophy; and by a study 
of the life of Cicero. Much of the reading will be done in private, 
and twelve exercises in translating English into Latin will be re- 
quired. 

II. 1918. Advanced grammar, and writing of Latin. 

III. 1919. The reading of considerable portions of Catullus, Lu- 
cretius, Juvenal, Seneca, and the Younger Pliny, with parallel read- 
ings in Dill, Mommsen, and Ferrero. These three courses constitute 
a major. Any one of them may be taken as a minor. Professor 
Uoopei . 



THE GRADUATE SCHOOL 245 

French. The class-room work consists of the translation of 20 pages 
of English into French, composition, conversation, lectures on rhet- 
oric and grammatical difficulties, and the reading of Balzac's Eu- 
genie Grandet and Hugo's Ruy Bias. The private reading is as fol- 
lows: Loti's Pecheur d'Islande, Daudet's Tartarin de Tarascon, 
Corneille's Polyeucte, Moliere's Le Tartuffe, Racine's Andromaque, 
Coppee's Pour la Couronne, Zola's La Debacle, Voltaire's "Prose" 
(a book of selections), Rostand's La Princesse Lointaine. Reports 
on this reading will be made in French. A minor course. Prere- 
quisite, French 2 or 2a. Professor Lustrat. 

English. A. The English Drama from the Beginnings to the Death 
of Elizabeth (1603). Based on Ward's English Dramatic Literature; 
Brooke's Tudor Drama; Bates's English Religious Drama; Manley's 
Specimens of the Pre-Shakespearean Drama. Plays from Udall, 
Stevenson, Sackville and Norton, Kyd, Lyly, Peele, Greene, Nash, 
Marlowe, Shakespeare, Jonson, and others. A study will be made 
of the development of the English Language and of the development 
of dramatic technique. Professor Park. 

B. From the Death of Elizabeth to the Closing of the Theatres 
(1642). Based on Ward's English Dramatic Literature; Schelling's 
English Drama; Collier's Annals of the English Stage; and plays se- 
lected from Shakespeare, Jonson, Beaumont and Fletcher, Webster, 
Masinger, Middleton, Dekker, Day, Chapman, Shirley, and others. 
A study will be made of the syntax of the language of Elizabeth's 
time in comparison with modern English. Professor Sanford. 

C. From the Closing of the Theatres to the Present Time. Based 
on Schelling's English Drama; Nettleton's English Drama of the 
Restoration and Eighteenth Century; Chandler's Modern Drama; 
plays from Dryden, Congreve, Wycherly, Shadwell, Addison, Sheri- 
dan, Goldsmith, Shelley, Browning, Tennyson, Lytton, Phillips, 
Shaw, Galsworthy, Jones, Pinero, and others. Frequent critical 
papers will be required. Professor Walker. 

Each of these courses is one-third of a major. A and B, or B and 
C, with some curtailment, may be taken as a minor. 

American History: the Formative Period. This course will em- 
brace the period of the Confederation (1781-1789); the drafting 
and ratification of the Constitution; and the period of Federal su- 
premacy (1789-1801). 

Based upon the standard general histories of the United States, 
Bancroft, Hildreth, T. Pitkin, Bryant & Gay, McMaster, Von Hoist, 
the course will include in part: Henry Adams, Hist. U. S., Vol. 1; 
Herbert B. Adams, Maryland's Influence; Justin Winsor, Narrative 
and Critical Hist.; J. Schouler, United States, Vol. 1; Fisk, Critical 
Period; Biographies of Washington, Jefferson, Hamilton, Franklin, 
James Wilson and others in the American Commonwealth Series, 



246 UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

American Statesmen Series, American Nation Series, and Makers of 
America; G. T. Curtis, History of the Constitution; Story, Jameson, 
Foster, on the Constitution; Elliott's Debates; Farrand's Records; 
the Federalist; Reprints in Hart's American History told by Con- 
temporaries. Prerequisites: A general acquaintance with the his- 
tory of the United States, and two college years of history. Pro- 
fessor McPherson. 

The Psychological Basis of Education. A study of the principles 
underlying mental and physical development, with emphasis upon 
their educational significance. The 'following topics will be dis- 
cussed: (1) Laws of Physical and Mental growth and experimental 
methods of investigating them; (2) psychological characteristics of 
the periods of infancy, childhood, puberty and post-adolescence; (3) 
study of special treatment of retarded and feeble-minded children. 

Prerequisite: General Psychology and History of Education. 

Kirkpatrick, Fundamentals of Child Study; Hall, Youth; Whipple, 
Manual of Mental and Physical Tests; and for private reading: 
Colvin, The Learning Process; Gulick and Ayres, Medical Inspection 
of Schools; Kirkpatrick, Genetic Psychology. 

This is one of a cycle of three courses, two of which constitute a 
minor, three a major. Professor Eeatwoie. 

Mathematics. One of the following courses will be given if at 
least two students elect it. Two of the courses constitute a minor; 
three, with a thesis, constitute a major: 

1. Differential Equations. An elementary course in ordinary and 
partial differential equations, with special reference to the equations 
occurring in the physical sciences. Text: Cohen or Murray. 

2. Vector Analysis. An elementary course in vectors which de- 
velops a system of coordinates and illustrates their use in certain 
mathematical and physical problems. Reference Text: Coffin. 

3. Projective Geometry. A course in pure geometry based upon 
one of the following texts with the others as references: Holgate's 
Reye, Cremona, Vebelen and Young. 

4. Theoretical Mechanics. An analytical treatment of certain 
problems in statics and dynamics with the aid of the Calculus. Many 
problems will be used. Text: Ziwet and Field, or Jeans. 

5. Theory of Functions. An introductory course to the theory of 
functions of a real and a complex variable. Reference Works: 
Harkness and 'Morley, Durege, Gousat. 

6. Analytical Geometry. An advanced course based on Salmon 
or other texts of a similar character. Professor Stephens and Adjunct 
Professor Pond. 

The Teaching of Vocational Agriculture. This course seeks to 
acquaint the teacher of agriculture with means and methods of meet- 
ing his instructional problems. Topics: organization of a depart- 



THE GRADUATE SCHOOL 247 

ment of agriculture in a high school; project organization, study, 
planning, supervision, supervised practice; extension and cooper- 
ative activities in school and community. A real survey is required. 

Readings: Teaching Agriculture, Nolan; Methods and Materials 
in High School Agriculture, Hummel; Secondary School Problems, 
Snedden; The Curriculum, Bobbitt; The School as a Social Agency, 
Robbins; Vocational G-uidance Movement, Brewer; Reports and Bul- 
letins of the Federal Board for Vocational Education, and of the 
Society for Vocational Education. 

This course is a major extended over three summer sessions, -with 
constant direction and supervision of the work of the student during 
the two intervening years. 

Prerequisite: B.S. Agr. or equivalent (including the professional 
courses in the Division of Agricultural Education). Adjunct Pro- 
fessor Sheffer. 



248 UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 



THE LAW DEPARTMENT 



FACULTY 

DAVID C. BARROW, LL.D., Chancellor of the University. 

SYLVANUS MORRIS, LL.D., Dean of the Law Department, Professor 
of Law. 

WALTER G. CORNETT, LL.B., Adjunct Professor of Law. 

HENRY G. HOWARD, A.B., LL.B., Adjunct Professor of Law. 

STEPHEN C. UPSON, A.B., LL.B., Adjunct Professor of Law. 

ANDREW J. COBB, A.B., B.L., Lecturer on Procedure and Consti- 
tutional Law. 

JOSEPH S. STEWART, Ped.D., Lecturer on Parliamentary Law. 



The next session of this Department begins September 17th, 1919. 
The time requisite for graduation is three years. The fees are 
$75.00 per year, of which $40.00 are due at the opening of the 
spring term. 

On arrival here, report at the Chancellor's office, or to the Dean, 
in the Academic Building, on the University campus. 

ENTRANCE REQUIREMENTS 

General. Students in this Department must not be less than 
eighteen years old, and must be of good moral character. 

First Year Class. The requirements for admission to the first 
year class include fourteen units. Any of the units recognized by 
the University may be offered. A unit is measured by five weekly 
periods of forty minutes each for one year in a college or high 
school subject. This requirement may be met by presentation of a 
diploma of graduation from a University or College authorized to 
confer it; by presentation of a certificate from a college or accred- 
ited school; by taking the entrance examinations prescribed by the 
committee on entrance. 

Second Year Class. Applicants for the second year class, in addi- 
tion to the general requirements and the fourteen units, must have 
completed one year's course of study in a standard law school, or 
must have read law under advice and direction in a law office for 
one year, and must stand satisfactory examinations on the work of 
the first year. 



THE LAW! DEPARTMENT 249 

SECOND YEAR ENTRANCE REQUIREMENTS 

Examinations for students applying to enter the second year class 
will be held as follows: 

Blaekstone, Books I. and II Monday, September 8th, 1919. 

Constitutional Law, and Insurance__Tuesday 9th, 

Elementary Law Wednesday, " 10th, 

Contracts Thursday, " 11th, 

Torts Friday, " 12th, 

Sales and Bailments Saturday, " 13th, 

Criminal Law and Agency Monday, 15th, 

Municipal Corporations Tuesday, " 16th, 

Examinations begin at nine o'clock A. M. each day. 

Applicants are particularly urged to bear this in mind. 

Transfers. Students transferring from the Academic Departments 
must obtain the written permission of the Chancellor and certificates 
from the proper officer of the University showing that they have 
been satisfactory students in those departments. 

Elective. Students not applying for the degree may enter the 
Department upon complying with the general requirements and pre- 
senting the fourteen units. 

A student may present, among the general options taken for A.B. 
and B.S. General, six hours from the curriculum of B.L., provided 
the courses taken and the time value of each be approved by the 
Curriculum Committee. 

COURSE OF STUDY 

The course in this Department is completed in three years, con- 
sisting of six terms. The exercises of the University, including this 
Department, begin on the third Wednesday in September in each 
year and end at the annual Commencement on the third Wednesday 
in June. 

The autumn term commences with the college year and closes the 
day before Christmas. 

The spring term commences the day following New Year and 
closes at Commencement. 

Two courses of instruction are pursued, to-wit, the Study Course 
and the Lecture Course, arranged as follows: 

Study Course 

The classes meet the professors of law daily, (except Sunday), 
according to schedule, with the previously assigned part of the text- 
book then being read. The professor delivers lectures explanatory 
of the text, discusses cases bearing on the text, and questions the 
members of the class on the text, the cases, and the lectures of the 
previous meeting. 



2 50 UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

First Year 

1. Elementary Principles of Law, twenty weeks. Texts: Black- 
stone's Commentaries and an American writer on Elementary Law. 

2. Torts, twelve weeks. Texts: Cooley on Torts and Code of Geor- 
gia. 

3. Criminal Law, seven weeks. Texts: Blackstone, Book IV, and 
Penal Code of Georgia. Six periods a week. Professor Morris. 

4. Constitutional Law, ten weeks. Texts: U. S. and State Con- 
stitutions. Lectures and cases selected by the professor. 

5. Contracts, twelve weeks. Texts: Lawson on Contracts and 
Code of Georgia. 

6. Sales, eight weeks. Texts: Tiffany on Sales and Code of Geor- 
gia. 

7. Bailments, ten weeks. Texts: Dobie on Bailments and Carriers. 
Five periods a week. Professor Cornett. 

8. Municipal Corporations, twelve weeks. Texts: Coole on Mu- 
nicipal Corporations. 

9. Agency, twelve weeks. Texts: Reinhard on Agency and Code 
of Georgia. 

10. Insurance, fifteen weeks. Text: Vance on Insurance. Four 
periods a week. Professor Upson. 

Second Year 

1. Common Law Pleading, ten weeks. Texts: Shipman's Common 
Law Pleading. 

2. Georgia Procedure, five weeks. Text: Code of Georgia. 

3 Equity Principles, twelve weeks. Texts: Bispham's Principles 
of Equity and Code of Georgia. 

4. Equity Pleading, 'four weeks. Texts: Rush's Equity Pleading, 
Code of Georgia, U. S. Equity Rules. 

5. Private Corporations, six weeks. Texts: Thomson on Corpora- 
tions and Code of Georgia. Six periods a week. Professor Morris. 

6. Negotiable Instruments, ten weeks. Texts: Norton on Bills 
and Notes, and Code of Georgia. 

7. Evidence, twelve weeks. Texts: Jones on Evidence, and Code 
of Georgia, with cases selected by the professor. 

8. Realty, ten weeks. Texts: Hawley & McGregor on Realty, Code 
of Georgia, and cases selected by the professor. 

9. Persons and Domestic Relations, eight weeks. Texts: Code of 
Georgia, and series of cases prepared by the professor. Six periods 
a week. Professor Cornett. 

10. Wills and Administration, twelve weeks. Gardner on Wills 
and Code of Georgia. 

11. Bankruptcy, fifteen weeks. Texts: Remington on Bankruptcy 
and the Statute. 






THE LAW DEPARTMENT 251 

12. Partnership, twelve weeks. Text: Gilmore on Partnership. 
Five periods a week. Professor Upson. 

13. Parliamentary Law, twenty periods. Text: Reed's Manual. 
Professor Stewart. 

Third Y T ear 

Banking. Roman Law. International Law. Conflict of laws. 
Study of cases on contracts. Torts. Corporations. 

LECTURE COURSES 

The class meets one of the several lecturers of the Department 
at the noon hour three times a week. The schedule is so arranged 
that the several courses of lectures do not conflict. The lecturers 
and their subjects are as follows: 

Lectures are delivered during the session to each class by the 
Hon. Andrew J. Cobb, on Procedure and Constitutional Law. 

A course of lectures on Parliamentary Law by Dr. J. S. Stewart, 
professor of Secondary Education, is given in the spring term. 

METHODS OF INSTRUCTION 

Reading. The best features of the lecture and the recitation are 
secured by the method of instruction pursued in this Department. 
Reading is daily assigned in the text-book, the professor comments 
on the same, and the student is required to recite therein. By this 
(means each part of the subject is explained to the student, is then 
read by him, and he is either questioned, or hears others questioned. 

From experience, as well as from observation, it is believed that 
the "lecture system" alone, as pursued in so many similar institu- 
tions, does not meet all the necessities of the case. However learned 
the lecturer and however attentive the student, the impression left 
upon the beginner's mind Is not so permanent as that produced by 
his own study of the subject, reinforced by the oral recitations and 
■by the explanations of the professors. Under the plan of instruction 
outlined, the student first studies with the incentive of desire to 
learn, and with knowledge that his fellow students will hear his oral 
examinations. Ample explanations and illustrations, together with 
incidenttal lectures arising out of the subject of the lesson, from the 
professors, aid the student's own labor. The consequence is that 
the student, from pride as well as ambition, learns each lesson, and 
his knowledge thus acquired is permanently fixed in his mind. The 
act of reciting fixes in the mind that which is recited. Moreover, the 
professor is, by this means, enabled to ascertain those points which 
are not understood by each student, and to adapt his explanations to 
the need of the entire class. 

Lectures. With this system of daily drilling in the recitation 
rooms, and with the proper study which it enforces, the student is 



252 UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

given a sufficient knowledge of the subject to prepare his mind for 
the incalculable benefit to be derived from lectures. It is believed 
that a knowledge of the law cannot well be obtained under either 
system unaided by the other; the effort is thus made to derive all 
the benefits of both. All the good features of the "recitation system" 
are thus combined with the "lecture system," and the attempt made 
to reap the fruits of both the general plans of professional education. 

Case Study. The study of cases illustrative of the principles under 
discussion is being steadily developed. The facilities for this work 
are greatly increased by the additions to the library. Special empha- 
sis is laid upon the study of Georgia cases, but the adjudications of 
courts of last resort throughout the country are examined and dis- 
cussed. The student is shown how to find and select authorities 
upon the question under investigation. He is directed to trace the 
adjudications of questions from their inception in court, through 
the development up to the crystalization of the settled doctrine as 
announced in the ruling case, and thus to observe the growth of law. 
This is more important in our state than elsewhere because the doc- 
trine announced by the Supreme Court is frequently embodied in the 
Code, and thus becomes positive statute. 

Pleading. In addition this course offers exceptional advantages in 
the frequent exercises in the actual drafting of pleadings and other 
legal papers, thus practically impressing on the mind of the student 
the principles involved by putting them into actual use. 

It is not, of course, expected that accomplished lawyers will be 
turned out in a course so short as this necessarily is. Until the time 
appears proper for lengthening the term of professional study, the 
course must be adapted to existing circumstances. But there is no 
reason why a student of average ability should not acquire in the 
alloted time a knowledge of the general principles of law, and a suf- 
ficient knowledge of "how to study" to carry on alone his advance- 
ment in the leisure which usually befalls the young lawyer. 

EXAMINATIONS 

There are two kinds of examinations — oral and written. Each 
professor daily examines orally on the prescribed reading. Written 
examinations are held at the conclusion of each text-book or branch 
of study. These examinations are made very searching, and the 
student is given abundant time to write out his answers without 
assistance, thus impressing upon his mind what he has learned and 
disclosing accurately and impartially his progress. 

DEGREE 

Students who continue in actual attendance upon the exercises 
of this Department during three years, of two terms each, and those 
who are admitted to the second year of the course, and continue in 



THE LAW DEPARTMENT 253 

actual attendance for two years, of two terms each, and complete 
successfully the required course of study, receive the degree of Bach- 
elor of Laws of the University of Georgia. 

ADMISSION TO THE BAR 

Under the law of the State the graduates of the Department are 
admitted to the bar, without examination, on the presentation of the 
diploma. 

Under a rule of the United States Court for the Northern District 
of Georgia, graduates of this department who have been admitted 
to the State Bar will be admitted to the District Court of the United 
States without examination. 

HONORS 

Two members of the Law Department are allowed places among 
the senior speakers on Commencement Day, and one representative 
of the Department on University Day. The speakers from the Law 
Department are chosen by the Faculty of the Law Department for 
general excellence in all the exercises and branches of study in the 
Department. Those of the senior class only are eligible to these 
places, who have attended the three full years course in this Depart- 
ment, and have incurred no conditions. 

MOOT COURTS AND LEGAL EXERCISES 

After the students are sufficiently advanced, moot courts are held 
in which one of the professors presides, the juries being taken from 
the students in other departments of the University. The law stu- 
dents are assigned to act as counsel in the cases on trial. In these 
courts the students are taught the actual practice of law, such as 
pleading, drawing orders, moving for new trials, advocacy before 
the court and jury, the use of reports and text-books as authority, 
in short, all the elements of actual court house practice. 

First year students are given practical work in practice and pro- 
cedure two hours each month throughout the year. 

Throughout the course exercises are given in pleading and draw- 
ing deeds, wills and mortgages, and all kinds of legal documents, 
including commercial paper. It is the purpose of the Department 
to equip its graduates for active practice of the profession. 

Moot Parliament. A moot parliament is organized annually by 
the members of the senior class, and conducted under the direction 
of the lecturer on that subject. 

SOCIETIES 

Literary 

There are two literary societies in connection with the University, 
viz., the Demosthenian and Phi Kappa Societies. The former was 
founded in 1801, the latter in 1820. The members of the societies 



254 UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

meet in their respective halls every Wednesday. Debates on inter- 
esting subjects are held at each meeting. In these debates the stu- 
dent learns self-reliance, readiness of expression, rapidity of thought. 
To the lawyer, perhaps one of the most valuable accomplishments 
is the ability "to think on his feet," and these societies afford a good 
field for the acquirement of this habit. 

JEFFERSONIAN LAW DEBATING SOCIETY 

The law students conduct a successful and beneficial society, 
which meets once a week, and they debate questions of law. All 
students of the Department are eligible to membership in the so- 
ciety. The society is one of the most useful 'features of the law 
course. 

DISCIPLINE 

In matters of discipline, the students of the Law Department are 
governed by the same rules and regulations prescribed for other 
students of the University. 

LIBRARY 

The General Library of the University contains more than 41,000 
volumes, and is housed in a handsome modern building. About 1,000 
volumes are added yearly, and the Library subscribes for nearly 200 
popular and professional periodicals. A number of local and metro- 
politan papers are received through gift or subscription. The hours 
of the week-day opening are from 8:30 A. M. until 10 P. M., with 
half-hour recess at dinner and supper time. The Sunday hours are 
from 3 to 6 P. M. The Library is in charge of a trained Librarian 
and permanent staff of three regular assistants and student assist- 
ants. All students have library privileges. 

The Library of the Law Department is located on the second floor 
of the Academic Building, is in charge of a librarian, and is open 
for the use of law students on every working day of the session. 
Within the last two years, books costing $1,200.00 have been added. 
The library now contains complete sets of the State Reports of 
Courts of last resort, of the Reports of the United States Supreme 
Court, of the American Reports, American Decisions, American State 
Reports, Lawyers' Reports Annotated, with complete digests, 
Statutes of the State and of the United States, and valuable text- 
books, many of them the last editions. Several standard magazines 
and other law publications are in the library. These purchases have 
been made so judiciously and upon such advantageous terms that 
the actual cost is far below the value of the books. 

Through the action of the authorities of the State library in re- 
placing text-books, many valuable reference books have been re- 
cently acquired by the law library. 

The University is indebted to the widow of the late Brantley A. 



THE LAW DEPARTMENT 255 

Denmark for the handsome and valuable library of her husband and 
of her son, the late Thomas N. Denmark, both loyal sons of the in- 
stitution. Valuable text-books were recently donated to the Univer- 
sity by Hon. Alex C. King, of Atlanta. The Reports of the State 
Supreme Court and of the Court of Appeals, the Acts of the Legisla- 
ture, Codes and other public books are furnished to the library by 
the State. 

Recently Mr. W. W. Davis, of Macon, gave to this department the 
splendid law library collected by his father, the late Hon. Buford 
M. Davis, '69, and by his brother, the lamented Bryan B. Davis, '07. 
This collection of several hundred volumes contains valuable text- 
books, reports and digests. 

Hon. H. S. West, of Athens, has recently donated a valuable col- 
lection of text-books and reference books to the department. 

During the year 1914 several hundred volumes were added by the 
gift to the University of the Horace B. Russell library. 

The widow of Hon. W. S. Basinger donated more than a hundred 
valuable volumes of her husband's library to the Department in 
1915. 

HISTORICAL. NOTE 

At the regular meeting of the Trustees of the University of Georgia 
in 1859, the board determined to reorganize the University, and in 
the plan that was then adopted it was determined to establish a law 
school, "in which facilities for the best legal education would be 
afforded." In pursuance of the plan, on August 4, 1859, on motion 
of Governor Herschel V. Johnson, Joseph Henry Lumpkin (the first 
Chief Justice of Georgia), William Hope Hull and Thomas R. R. 
Cobb were elected professors, and the law school opened in the 
autumn of that year. On December 19, 1859, by an Act of the 
General Assembly of Georgia, the Lumpkin Law School was incor- 
porated, and these three gentlemen were both the incorporators and 
the professors. From that time to the death of Judge Lumpkin in 
186 7 (Mr. Cobb having died in 1862), the Law Department of the 
University was conducted under the name of the Lumpkin Law 
School, and the graduates were awarded their diplomas by the Trus- 
tees at the regular Commencement. The exercises of the law school 
were suspended during the War Between the States. 

In August, 1867, Benjamin H. Hill and William L. Mitchell were 
elected by the Board of Trustees to the two vacancies in the Law 
Department, and from that time forward the Law School has been 
conducted under the name of the Law Department of the University. 

From the time of Mr. Hill's election to the United States Senate 
in 1877, his connection with the school was nominal, and the classes 
were under the sole care of Dr. Mitchell until 1881, when Pope 
Barrow and George Dudley Thomas were elected professors of Law. 



256 UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

Dr. Mitchell died in 1882, and Mr. Barrow resigned in 1883. In 
1884 Andrew J. Cobb was elected, and from that time until 1890 
Mr. Thomas and Mr. Cobb filled the chairs. 

In 1890 Howell Cobb was elected. In 1893 Mr. Thomas and Mr. 
Andrew J. Cobb having resigned as regular professors, and become 
lecturers, Sylvanus Morris was elected. 

The chair of lecturer on Medical Jurisprudence was filled by Dr. 
R. D. Moore until 1873, to 1879 by Dr. R. M. Smith, from 1880 to 
1883 by Dr. John Gerdine, and in 1883 Dr. S. C. Benedict was elect- 
ed. In 1907, Dr. Benedict having resigned, T. F. Green was elected 
Lecturer on Medical Jurisprudence. In 1908, Mr. Green having 
resigned, Dr. James C. Bloomfield was selected Lceturer on Medical 
Jurisprudence. This course was abolished in 1916. 

From 1873 to the time of his death in January 1888, Chancellor 
P. H. Mell delivered lectures on Parliamentary Law to the class in 
connection with the senior class in other departments of the Uni- 
versity. In 1894 John D. Mell was elected Lecturer on Parlia- 
mentary Law. 

Dr. J. H. T. McPherson was elected lecturer on Roman Law in 
1899. 

In 1900 Sylvanus Morris was elected Dean. 

In 1901 the Course of Study was extended from one to two years. 

In 1906 Thomas F. Green was elected Lecturer on Federal Pro- 
cedure. 

In 1908 Hon. Andrew J. Cobb was elected Lecturer on Procedure 
and Constitutional Law. 

In 1909, Hon. Howell Cobb having resigned as regular professor, 
and having been made professor emeritus, Mr. Thomas F. Green was 
elected regular professor of law. 

Hon. Howell Cobb died during the year 1909. 

In 1909 John D. Mell resigned as lecturer on Parliamentary Law. 

In 1912 Joseph S. Stewart was elected lecturer on Parliamentary 
Law. 

In 1913 H. Abit Nix was elected Instructor in Law. 

In 1918 T. F. Green and H. Abit Nix resigned and Walter G. 
Cornett and Henry G. Howard were elected. 

The course was extended to three years. 

In 1919 Henry G. Howard resigned and Stephen C. Upson was 
elected. 

TUITION AND EXPENSES 

The tuition in the Law Department is $75.00 per annum, divided 
as follows: $40.00 for the autumn term, to January first; and $35.00 
for the spring term, from January first to Commencement. Tuition 
is payable in advance at the beginning of each term. 



THE LAW DEPARTMENT 257 

No matriculation or library fee is required in this Department. 
The students in law are entitled to the privileges of all other de- 
partments of the University, at Athens, without extra charge. 

The expenses of the course are as follows: 

Tuition, per annum $75.00 

Initiation fee, literary society . 2.00 

Infirmary fee 3.00 

Visit from Physician at Room. Privileges of Infirmary and 
Nurse. Prescriptions. Typhoid Inoculation. Physical Ex- 
amination. 

Gymnasius fee 3.00 

Classes in Gymnastics. Privileges of the Building and Swim- 
ming Pool. 

Athletic fee 6.00 

Admission to all contests held in Athens. 

Board, per month 18.00 

Washing, fuel and lights, per month 3.00 

Stationery for the year 2.00 

Text-books can be had for about (each year) 75.00 

The incidental expenses of a student are just what he makes them, 
and the patrons of the University are urged to take into their own 
hands the control of a matter which no college regulations can reach. 

Excellent table board on the cooperative plan can be had in the 
new Denmark Dining Hall at $18.00 per month; elsewhere at $20.00 
per month and upwards. In Candler Hall (the new Dormitory), 
and in New College the rooms contain bedstead, washstand, tables 
and chairs. The student furnishes all other articles, mattress, pillow 
and his own fuel and lights. In the other dormitory the student 
furnishes his room. The rooms are now furnished but the furniture 
belongs to the students. A new student can usually purchase at a 
very low price the furniture, or a half interest therein, from the stu- 
dents who have graduated. On account of the large demand for 
these rooms, application should be made as far in advance as possi- 
ble to the Chancellor. 

If dormitory rooms cannot be obtained, or are not desired, the 
next cheapest plan is to rent a furnished room in some residence 
near the Dining Hall. Many such rooms are for rent, on the campus 
and elsewhere. The prices range from $5.00 per month ($2.50 for 
each occupant of a room), upwards, including rent of furniture and 
bedding, attendance and lights, but not usually including fuel. 

If preferred, the student can obtain board and lodging in private 
houses, at prices ranging from $20.00 to $25.00 per month. 

LOAN FUNDS 

Law students are admitted to participate in the benefits of the 



258 UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

"Brown Fund" and the "Lumpkin Fund." Those who wish infor- 
mation in regard to these funds should write to Chancellor David 
C. Barrow, Athens, Georgia. 

For further information, list of books, schedules, entrance cer- 
tificates, apply to SYLVANUS MORRIS, 

Athens, Georgia. 



THE PHARMACY DEPARTMENT 259 

THE PHARMACY DEPARTMENT 



FACULTY 

DAVID CRENSHAW BARROW, LtL.D., Chancellor of the University. 
ROBERT C. WILSON, Ph.G., Director, Professor of Materia Medica 

and Pharmacy. 
HENRY CLAY WHITE, Ph.D., Sc.D., D.C.L., LL.D., Professor of 

Chemistry. 
WILLIAM D. HOOPER, A.M., Professor of Pharmaceutical Latin. 
L. L. HENDREN, Ph.D., Professor of Physics. 
J. M. READE, Ph.D., Professor of Botany. 

HOMER V. BLACK, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Chemistry. 
C. B. SWETLAND, Instructor in Chemistry. 
W. T. WRIGHT, M.S., Adjunct Professor of Physics. 
B.M. GILBERT, Ph.G., Tutor in Pharmacy. 



ANNOUNCEMENT 

The next session of this Department begins September 17th, 1919. 
rhe time required to complete the course is two years of three terms 
Bach. The first term begins at the opening of College in September, 
:he third term ending at Commencement in June. 

It is the aim of the University in adding the Department of Phar- 
macy to give to the profession of pharmacy men qualified to hold 
positions of trust and responsibility. It believes it can best serve 
:his mission by giving educated men. With a view to a thorough 
comprehension of the course, the following 

Entrance Requirements 

lave been adopted, corresponding to the standards of the American 
Conference of Pharmaceutical Faculties: 

1. The applicant must be of good moral character. 

2. He must be not less than 17 years of age, unless he be a grad- 
late of one of the accredited high schools of this or other state. 

3. A satisfactory completion of at least two years of work in an 
iccredited high school or 8 units (English, Mathematics, History) 
hall be demanded. 

Decrees 
1. Students who continue in actual attendance upon the exercises 
f this department during the two years of three terms each, and 
hose who have been admitted to the second year of the course and 
ontinue in actual attendance for one year, and complete success- 
ully the required courses of study, receive the degree of Graduate 
a Pharmacy (Ph.G.) of the University of Georgia. 



260 UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

2. The regulations of the University do not permit the conferring 
of more than one academic degree upon the same person at one 
time. Exceptional and earnest students of the University, candidates 
for a baccalaureate degree may, however, on recommendation of the 
Dean of the Department of Pharmacy, and with the approval of the 
Faculty, enter the course in Pharmacy and Materia Medic a, and, on 
completion of all the studies included in the curriculum for Graduate 
in Pharmacy will be awarded this diploma, notwithstanding it may 
be conferred at the same time as the baccalaureate degree. This 
permission will be withdrawn immediately if it shall appear from 
the standing of the student in any of his studies that he cannot 
satisfactorily undertake the additional work. There is quite a de- 
mand and at good salaries for men completing this course and 
positions are open immediately after graduation. No other pro- 
fession offers better inducements to young men. 

Government 

Students of Pharmacy are governed by the same rules and regu- 
lations as are laid down for other students of the University, except 
that they are not required to drill. 

COURSE OF STUDY 

Junior Year 

Satisfactory completion of the following subjects is required: 

Chemistry. Course 2 and 2a, general principles, Metals, Non- 
Metals. Three hours recitation, one laboratory period of two hours 
per week during entire year. Text: Smith's College Chemistry. 

Elementary Physics. Physics 1. In this course especial emphasis 
is laid on the applications of the principles of Physics to practical 
life. Textbook: Mann and Twiss, Physios, with special laboratory 
notes. Two hours per week recitation and three hours per week 
individual laboratory work. 

Physiology. Course 1. Three hours recitation per week. Text: 
The Human Mechanism, Hough and Sedgwick. 

Botany and Materia Meclica. Three hours recitation per week 
during entire year. Text: Bailey's Botany, Culbreath's Materia 
Medica. 

Pharmaceutical Latin. Two hours recitation per week during fall 
term. Text: Sturmer's Pharmaceutical Latin. 

Pharmaceutical Mathematics. Three hours recitation and three 
laboratory periods of two hours each during first eight weeks of; 
the year. Including study of Weights and Measures, Specific Gravity,! 
Specific Volume, Alligation, etc. Text: Sturmer's Arithmetic of 
Pharmacy. 

General Pharmaceutical Operations. Three hours recitation and 
three laboratory periods of two hours each, during the remainder 



THE PHARMACY DEPARTMENT 2 61 

of the fall term. This course includes the study of Evaporation, 
Distillation, Sublimation, Percolation, etc. Text: Amy's Pharmacy. 
Official Pharmacy. Three hours recitation and three laboratory 
periods of two hours each per week. This course includes the study 
and manufacture of Waters, Syrups, Mucilages, Emulsions, Tinc- 
tures, Pills, etc., beginning in January. 

Senior Year 

Organic Chemistry. Course 3. Three hours recitation per week 
with accompanying laboratory exercises. Text: Stoddard. 

Qualitative Analysis. Course 8. Three laboratory periods two 
hours each per week. Text: Noyes. 

Quantitative Analysis. By doubling the time in quantitative analy- 
sis and satisfactorily completing this course, students may obtain 
permission to take this work. An additional laboratory fee of $5.00 
will be charged for this course. 

Materia Medica. Three hours recitation per week during entire 
year. Texts: Culbreath and Wilcox. 

Manufacturing and Dispensing Pharmacy, Pharmaceutical Chem- 
istry. Three hours recitation, three laboratory periods of two hours 
each week during entire year. Text: Amy, Remington, U. S. P., 
Scoville. 

16. Principles of Accounting. Associate Professor Dozicr. 

(a) First half-year. The principles of accounting are presented 
through the transactions of bookkeeping, and the general features 
of accounting for retail and wholesale business, partnerships, and 
corporations are then studied. 

(b) Second half-year. Accounting principles are studied from 
the standpoint of the business manager. 

LABORATORIES 

No college of Pharmacy offers better laboratory facilities than are 
found at the University. We have in operation for students in 
Pharmacy .five thoroughly equipped laboratories. 

In Pharmacy, Junior and Senior men occupy separate rooms. In 
Chemistry, three laboratories are in operation, one for Junior stu- 
dents, one each for men doing quantitative and qualitative analysis. 
The Physical laboratory is complete. 



262 UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

EXPENSES 

Junior Year 

Tuition, one-half payable at beginning of the term, 

balance at the opening of college in January, $50.00 

Literary Society Fee 2.00 

Pharmaceutical Laboratory 12.50 

Chemical Laboratory 2.50 

Materia. Medica , 1.00 

Physics Laboratory 3.00 

Fee for Infirmary, etc., (see p. 42) 12.00 



$83.00 
Senior Year 

Tuition, payable as above $50.00 

Literary Society 1.00 

Qualitative Analysis 10.00 

Organic Chemistry Laboratory 2.50 

Materia iMedica 1.00 

Pharmaceutical Laboratory 12.50 

Fee for Infirmary 12.00 



$89.00 
Other expenses, estimated: 

Board and lodging, per month $13.00 to $30.00 

Washing, fuel and lights, per month 3.00 

Textbooks for both years $15.00 to 20.00 

The individual expenses of a student are just what he makes 
them; no college regulation can control this matter. 

No graduation or diploma fees. 

Excellent table board on the cooperative plan can be had in Den- 
mark Hall for $16.00 per month; elsewhere from $20.00 per month 
upwards. Rooms in the dormitories are rent free, but a monthly 
fee of $4.00 is charged for light and attendance. On account of the 
large demand for rooms, application should be made to the Registrar 
as far in advance as possible. 

If dormitory rooms cannot be obtained, or are not desired, the 
next cheapest plan is to rent a furnished room in some residence 
near the Dining Hall. Many such rooms are for rent on the campus 
and elsewhere. The prices range from $5.00 per month ($2.50 for 
each occupant) upwards, including rent of furniture and bedding, 
attendance and light, but not fuel. 






THE PHARMACY DEPARTMENT 2 63 

PRIVILEGES AND ADVANTAGES OFFERED AT THE UNIVER- 
SITY FOR STUDENTS IN PHARMACY 

Self-Help. Students of Pharmacy are eligible to apply for a loan 
from the Brown Fund to defray their expenses in college. Applica- 
tion for this loan should be made to the Chancellor. 

Expense and Cost of Living are lower at the University than at 
any other college. Room rent in Candler Hall and New College is 
low, while table board may be had at Denmark Hall, accommodating 
between two and three hundred students, for $16.00 per month. 

Library. The Library of the University is open from 8:30 A. M. to 
10 P. M., to students in Pharmacy. This is a well lighted and ventil- 
ated building, set apart ( for reference and research work. Thousands 
of volumes relating to Literature, Science and Art are at the disposal 
of students. 

Athletics. The .School of Pharmacy is represented on both the 
football and baseball teams of the University. Athletics, while en- 
couraged, are not allowed to conflict with college duties. 

Societies. All students of the University are required to join one 
of the literary societies. These societies are presided over by officers 
elected from the student body and they afford opportunity for train- 
ing men in Parliamentary Law, and in facilitating expression. 

Other Courses. Pharmacy students may obtain permission to at- 
tend other courses without cost, offered in the University, when such 
work does not conflict with work in Pharmacy. 

Reference Books. The School of Pharmacy has Dispensatories and 
Pharmacopoeias and textbooks for reference by students. 

Examinations are held at the end of each term, Christmas, March 
and June, supplemented by frequent oral and written quizzes. 

Hospital Corps. This is optional with Pharmacy students, but it 
affords opportunity for military training, and a number of the stu- 
dents join the corps. 

For bulletins which describe this course in detail, and for further 
information, apply to 

ROBERT C. WILSON, Director. 



264 UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 



THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SCHOOL 



BOARD OF ADMINISTRATION 

DAVID C. BARROW, LL.D., Chancellor of the University, President 
of the Board. 

MARION LUTHER BRITTAIN, LLJD., State 'School Superintendent 
of Georgia. 

JERE M. POUND, LL.D., President of the State Normal School. 

CHARLES M. SNELLING, D.Sc, Dean of the University and Pres- 
ident of Franklin College. 

ANDREW M. SOULE, LL.D., Dean of the College of Agriculture, 
and President of the State College of Agriculture and Mechanic 
Arts. 

THOMAS J. WOOFTER, LL.D., Dean of Peabody School of Educa- 
tion, University of Georgia, Secretary of the Board. 

CALENDAR 

June 28 — Registration begins. 
June 30 — Opening Day. Registration. 
July 4 — Patriotic Address. 
July 16-17 — Devereux Players. 

August 2 — Closing Day for Reviews and Special Short Courses for 
Teachers. 

August 1-2 — 'State Examinations for Teachers' Certificates. 

August 8 — (Closing of Six Weeks' College (Credit Courses. 
August 22 — dosing of Eight Weeks' Courses. 

OFFICERS 
DAVID C. BARROW, LL.D President 

Chancellor of the University. 
THOMAS J. WOOFTER, LL.D Superintendent 

Dean of Peabody School of Education. 
CORNELIUS J. HEATWOLE, B.S., M.S. --Assistant Superintendent 

Professor of Education, Peabody School of Education. 
HORACE B. RITCHIE, A.B Assistant Superintendent 

Dean of the State Normal School. 
WILLIS H. BOCOCK, LL.D Director Graduate Courses 

Dean of Graduate School. 
ROBERT P. STEPHENS, PhD Director College Credit Courses 

Professor of Mathematics, University of Georgia. 
HAROLD D. MEYER, A.M Director of Teachers' Bureau 

Professor of Sociology, State Normal School. 
MRS. BEATRICE M. McGARRAH Adviser of Women 

Home Assistant, South Georgia State Normal College. 



UNIVERSITY SUMMER SCHOOL 265 

MISS IDA McGUKIN, Sum. Sen. Grad Adviser of Women 

Teacher, Hartwell, Ga. 
THOMAS W. REED, A.M Registrar and Treasurer 

Registrar and Treasurer of the University of Georgia. 

MISS FANNIE MAY SHOUSE Secretary 

CHARLES SANFORD Assistant 

Directors of Dormitories 

ROBERT E. PARK, Litt.D., for the University. 
ALEXANDER RHODES, A.B., for the Normal School. 

FACULTY 
GERTRUDE A. ALEXANDER, A.M Reading, Phonics 

Head of Department of Expression, State Normal School. 
MARY A. BACON T _Bird Life and Nature Study 

Author and Teacher, Lucy Cobb Institute. 
DAVID C. BARROW, LL.D Lecturer 

Chancellor of the University of Georgia. 
LENA BIRD Penmanship 

Supervising Teacher of Penmanship, Schools of Athens, Ga. 
WILLIS H. BOCOCK, LL.D., Issues of the War, Eco. Geography 

Dean of the Graduate School, University of Georgia. 
MARION L. BRITTAIN, LL.D Lecturer 

State Superintendent of Schools, Georgia. 
PETER F. BROWN, A.B Elementary Language, Grammar 

Professor of English, State Normal School. 
DUNCAN BURNET, A.M Library 

Head Librarian, University of Georgia. 
GEORGE W. CAMP, A.M., Ped.M., English Grammar and Literature 

Professor of English and Education, North Georgia Agricul- 
tural College. 
EPSIE CAMPBELL, B.S Vocational Foods and Sanitation 

Head of Department of Home Economics, Baylor College for 

Women. 
J. F. CANNON, M.S Vocational Industrial Education 

State Supervisor of Vocational Industrial Education, Trades 

and Industries. 
JAMES W. CANTRELL, A.B Physics 

Instructor of Physics, University of Georgia. 
CAROLYN COBB Expression, Dramatic Interpretation 

Reader and Teacher of Dramatic Art. 
CLARA LEE CONE, B.S Home Economics 

Graduate Student, Columbia University, Teacher's College. 
MARY E. CRESWELL, B.S Vocational Home Economics 

Director of Home Economics Division, State College of Agri- 
culture. 



2 66 UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

H. D. CUMMING, A.B Educational Tests and Measurements 

Principal of Glynn Academy. 
LOIS P. DOWDLE Home Demonstration 

Assistant State Supervisor of Home Economics. 
M. L. DUGGAN- Rural School Methods and Management 

State Rural School Agent. 
DAVID L. EARNEST, A.M Physiology, Arithmetic 

Professor of Natural Science, State Normal School. 
JOHN R. FAIN, B.S Agronomy 

Professor of Agronomy, State College of Agriculture. 
GEORGE D. GODDARD, A.B Rural School and Management 

Special State Supervisor of Elementary Schools. 
AGNES C. GOSS Library 

Librarian, State Normal School. 
LEROY C. HART, B.S Industrial Vocational Education 

Professor of Agricultural Engineering, College of Agriculture. 
LINVILLE L. HENDREN, Ph.D Physics, General Science 

Professor Physics, University of Georgia. 
CORNELIUS J. HEATWOLE, B.S., M.S Educational Psychology 

Professor of Education, Acting Professor of Psychology, School 

of Education, University of Georgia. 
KATE E. HICKS Director Demonstration School 

Principal of State Normal Training School. 
PARNA B. HILL (Elementary Sewing 

Instructor in Household Arts, State Normal School. 
THOMAS S. HOLLAND, A.B French 

Instructor in French, University of Georgia. 
ANNIE M. HOLLIDAY Drawing and Art 

Instructor in Drawing, State Normal School. 
T. E. HOLLINGSWORTH, A.B Arithmetic 

Professor of Mathematics, State Normal School. 
W. D. HOOPER, M.A Latin 

Professor of Latin, University of Georgia. 
LOUISE JOHNSON, A.B Geography 

Instructor in Geography, South Georgia Normal College. 
MAYBELLE LaHATTE Story Telling, Expression 

Teacher and Student of Dramatic Art, Atlanta, Ga. 
FORT E. LAND, A.B Rural School Methods 

State Supervisor of Schools, Georgia. 
ADA T. LEMON Physical Education 

Supervisor of Physical Education, Savannah City Schools. 
JOSEPH LUSTRAT, Bach, es Lett French 

Professor of Romance Languages, University of Georgia. 
MARY D. LYNDON, A.M Rhetoric and Composition 

Instructor in English, Lucy Cobb Institute. 



UNIVERSITY SUMMER SCHOOL 2 37 

ROBERT D. MALTBY, B.S Vocational Agriculture 

State Supervisor of Vocational Agriculture, Georgia. 

J. O. MARTIN, B.S Rural School Methods and Management 

State Supervisor of Schools, Georgia. 

HAROLD D. MEYER, A.M History 

Professor of Sociology, State Normal School. 
THOMAS H. McHATTON, B.S., D.Sc Horticulture 

Professor of Horticulture, State College of Agriculture. 

ELLA CLARE McKELLAR, A.M Physical Education 

Instructor in Physical Education, High School, Athens, Ga. 

J. H. T. McPHERSON, Ph.D History, Government 

Professor of History and Political Science, University of Geor- 
gia. 
ROBERT E. PARK, Litt. D English 

Professor of English Literature, University of Georgia. 
WILLIAM O. PAYNE, A.M History 

Associate Professor of History, University of Georgia. 
R. S. POND, Ph.D Mathematics 

Associate Professor of Mathematics, University of Georgia. 
RAFAEL W. RAMIREZ, A.B Spanish 

Instructor of Spanish, University of Georgia. 
ROSALIE V. RATHBONE, B.S Home Economics 

Junior Professor of Textiles and Clothing, State College of 

Agriculture. 
J. M. READE, Ph.D Botany 

Professor of Botany, University of Georgia. 
HORACE B. RITCHIE, A.B School Management 

Professor of Psychology and Pedagogy, State Normal School. 
S. V. SANFORD, Litt.D English Literature, Journalism 

Professor of English Language and Journalism, University of 

Georgia. 
E. S. SELL, M.S Elementary Agriculture 

Professor of Agriculture, State Normal School. 
L. M. SHEFFER, B.S Agricultural Education 

Junior Professor of Agricultural Education, State College of 

Agriculture. 
ELIZABETH W. SINCLAIR Reading and Literature 

Formerly Teacher of Reading, Schools of Waycross, Ga. 
JOSEPH S. STEWART, Ped.D.__Secondary Education, Supervision 

Professor of Secondary Education, University of Georgia. 
EARLE G. WELCH, B.S Agricultural Engineering 

Adjunct Professor of Agricultural Engineering, State College 

of Agriculture. 
JOHN T. WHEELER, B.S Agricultural Education 



2 68 UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

Professor of Agricultural Education, State College of Agricul- 
ture. 
HENRY C. WHITE, Se.D., LL.D Chemistry 

Professor Chemistry, University of Georgia. 
JNO. F. WOOD, A.M Education 

Professor of Education, South Georgia Normal College 
THOMAS JACKSON WOOFTER, A.M., LL.D Education 

Professor of Philosophy and Education, University of Georgia. 
T. G. YAXIS, B.S., M.S Vocational Animal Husbandry 

Adjunct Professor of Dairying, State College of Agriculture. 
MRS. LOUISE K. YOUNG Handicrafts, Music 

Primary Teacher, Decatur, Ga. 
MARY LAVINIA YOUNG Music 

Head Department of Music, South Georgia Normal College. 
ELIZABETH B. YOUNG? Demonstration School 

Critic Teacher, State Normal Training School. 
MARY ZEIGLER Primary Methods 

Instructor in Child Study, State Normal School. 



GENERAL INFORMATION 



The Summer School of the University of Georgia was authorized 
by the General Assembly in 19 3, and the trustees of the University 
created a board of directors representing different public interests 
for the general management of the school. The State Board of 
Education working in conformity with the action of the General 
Assembly has approved the work of the University Summer School 
and authorized the granting of certificates of the normal and sec- 
ondary grade, the holding of state examinations, and the approval of 
attendance upon its courses as satisfying renewal requirements. It 
is, in short, a regular part of the state system of public education. 

The main work of the University Summer School is to serve the 
interests of public education in Georgia. Its work will be chiefly 
concerned in meeting the needs of teachers. 

The University Summer School will, therefore, give special atten- 
tion: 

1. To teachers or prospective teachers in all grades who wish 
to improve their scholarship, to study the best .methods, or to pre- 
pare for the state license examinations, primary or elementary, or 
for professional license. 

2. To high* school teachers or prospective high school teachers 
who desire better training for their chosen subjects, or who wish to 
prepare for the state secondary license examination or professional 
license. 



UNIVERSITY SUMMER SCHOOL 2 69 

• 

3. To superintendents and principals who desire additional help 
in school organization, administration, and methods of grade work. 

4. To teachers or prospective teachers who wish to prepare them- 
selves for teaching home economics, agriculture, music, drawing, 
physical training, or other special subjects. 

5. To teachers, principals, supervisors and superintendents who 
already hold college degrees or have done some work of college 
grade and who desire to work either for the B.A., B.S., or for the 
M.A., or M.S. degree, or to improve their professional training. 

6. To college students or prospective students who wish to obtain 
college credit towarsd a degree, to make up deficiencies in college 
work, or in entrance units. 

LOCATION 

Athens, the seat of the University of Georgia, is situated among 
the rolling hills of Northeast Georgia along an upper portion of 
the Oconee river, is high and healthful, the elevation being nearly 
eight hundred feet above sea level, free from malarial conditions, 
the water pure, and the climate excellent in every way. The city 
of Athens has grown up around the University as its central factor. 
It has become a prosperous city of 20,000 inhabitans. The city is 
easy of access, five railroads now entering here. 

PLANT AND FACILITIES 

The entire University plant will be available, including library, 
laboratories, lecture halls, dormitories, gymnasium and swimming 
pool of the central University; the Agricultural College with its 
equipment of class rooms, library, laboratories, dairies, greenhouses, 
and farm of 1,000 acres; the State Normal School with its dormito- 
ries, class rooms, library, assembly room, play grounds, and charm- 
ing environment of 40 acres of campus and farm. This unusual 
combination of three institutions gives the Georgia Summer School 
a delightful and unexcelled environment and facilities for study and 
recreation. 

LIBRARIES 

The University library will be open every day and evening for 
reading and consulting of books and periodicals. The library con- 
tains over 40,000 volumes. The Normal School library will be open 
every day except Sunday, and the Agricultural College library will 
be available when needed. 

HEALTH 

The Summer School students have enjoyed an enviable health 
record for the past summers. The Crawford W. Long Infirmary of 
the University and the new infirmary of the Normal School will 
be open and will be under the direction of a physician and an able 
corps of trained nurses. A small registration fee of fifty cents is 



270 UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

charged for the use of the infirmary, usual medical treatment and 
the services of a trained nurse. These features will add much to 
the general comfort and health of students. 

DORMITORIES 

The effort has been made this year to increase the dormitory facil- 
ities to accommodate as many as may come and to add to their 
pleasure and comfort. 

At the State Normal School. At the State Normal School five 
dormitories are available which will furnish superior accommodation 
for several hundred teachers. These are Bradwell, Gilmer, Senior, 
Winnie Davis and Miller Halls. These Normal School dormitories 
are grouped conveniently together and form a delightful community, 
convenient to games, entertainments, open air concerts and all priv- 
ileges of the campus. 

At the University. At the University, Old College, New College, 
Candler Hall, Lumpkin Hall and Lucas Hall will be available. Of 
these all but Lumpkin and Lucas Halls are reserved for women. 
The City Y. M. C. A. building, one of the best equipped of any city, 
will be available for men and for a reasonable fee they may enjoy 
the showers and swimming pool as well as recreation features. 

At the College of Agriculture. There is a students' cottage for 
about twenty students taking advanced work in home economics. 
This cottage will be in charge of one of the teachers for similar stu- 
dents during the summer session. 

There is a most excellent cafeteria in the College of Agriculture, 
home economics department, open to the general public. 

Many rooms may be had in homes nearby. 

DINING HALLS 

Dining halls at both the University and Normal School are con- 
ducted under most favorable circumstances, having the advantage of 
the regular managements. In connection with each a farm and 
dairy will furnish practical assistance in supplying plenty of whole- 
some food at reasonable cost. The price of board quoted is for the 
entire term, beginning Monday, June 30, and extending through 
Saturday, August 2. However, the dining halls will be open Satur- 
day, June 2 8, at supper to accommodate those who wish to come 
early, and for this service only a nominal fee of twenty-five cents 
will be charged. 

APPLICATION FOR ROOMS 

Application for rooms should be made at the earliest moment 
possible. At the University the application should be accompanied 
by the fee for room, and should bo sent to Mr. T. W. Reed, Registrar 
of the University, Athens, Georgia. Rooms will be reserved in the 
order of applications. Fees will always be returned and room re- 



UNIVERSITY SUMMER SCHOOL 2 71 

leased for good reason. Application for rooms at the State Normal 
School should also be made as early as possible but no fee is re- 
quired at the time of reservation. Application should be made to 
Mr. A. Rhodes, Registrar of the State Normal School, Athens, Geor- 
gia. Students occupying rooms in any of the dormitories should 
bring with them at least the following articles: One pillow, two pairs 
of pillow cases, two pairs of sheets, two counterpanes, a half dozen 
towels. 

FEES AND OTHER EXPENSES 

The effort is made to make all expenses for the stay in Athens as 
small as possible, consistent with the teachers' desired standards. 

At the University. Room rent for the session in a dormitory 
of the University will be $5.00. Meals in the University dining hall 
for the five weeks will be $26.00; for one week, $6.00; for less than 
one week, $1.00 per day. 

At the Normal School. Room and board at the State Normal 
School for the entire session of five weeks, will be $30.00. For time 
less than five weeks, $1.00 a day will be charged. 

The general registration fee for all courses is $5.00, and there 
will be no additional fee for courses not for college credit. 

The fees for college credit courses will be in addition to the regis- 
tration fee, as follows: $2.00 for each credit hour assigned to the 
course or courses taken, the total for registration and additional 
fees not to exceed $15.00 for as many courses as the Director of 
College Courses permits. 

The additional fees will not be charged for courses in Vocational 
Education (Smith-Hughes). 

The fee for Graduate Courses is $15.00, which includes the regis- 
tration fee. 

An infirmary fee of 50 cents will be charged all students. 

Small laboratory fees will be charged in the courses in household 
arts, agriculture, arts and crafts, to cover cost of materials. 

Other expenses will vary with the number of text-books desired, 
the number of incidentals and plans of the student. The total neces- 
sary expenses while in Athens may be limited to from $40.00 to 
$60.00 for the Teachers' Summer Session of five weeks. 

REGISTRATION 

Students should present themselves for registration on Monday, 
June 30, which day will be given over to registration. The regis- 
tration on this day will be in George Peabody Hall at the University 
and James M. Smith Building at the Normal School. The Superin- 
tendents and members of the faculty will be present for consultation. 

Students should, as far as possible, arrange to reach Athens in 



2 72 UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

time to register and start classes Tuesday morning, July 1. The 
dormitories are opened Saturday at noon for the session. 

STATE EXAMINATIONS 

The annual state examinations for Primary, General Elementary 
High School, and Renewal licenses will be held at the Summer 
School August 1 and 2, under authority of the State Board. Li- 
censes will be issued to those passing the several examinations. 
Every opportunity will be given for study and preparation for these 
examinations. The State Board recommends that every teacher 
should attend a summer school at least one year during the life of 
the license. 

COURSES OF INSTRUCTION, 1919 

DIVISIONS 

I. Primary and Elementary Normal. 

II. High School. 

III. College Credit. 

IV. University Graduate. 

V. Special Vocational (Smith-Hughes). 

1. Trade and Industrial Education. 

2. Agricultural Education. 

3. Home Economics. 

COURSES BY TOPICS 
Note: — The numerals after any course indicate year hours of col- 
lege credit which may be acquired through that course. 

Agriculture 

1. Review of Elementary Agriculture for State Examination. 

2. Elementary Agriculture and Gardening. 

3. Nature Study. 

Vocational Agriculture (Smith-Hughes) 

1. Introduction to Vocational Education, 1%. 

2. Methods and Materials in Vocational Agriculture, iy 2 . 

3. Methods and Materials in Vocational Education, \y 2 . 

4. Horticulture, Plant Propagation, l x / 2 . 

5. Horticulture, Fruit Growing and Pruning, 1 y 2 . 

6. Farm Animals, two courses, 1 y 2 . 

7. Soils and Soil Fertility, \y 2 . 

8. Field Crops, 1 y 2 . 

9. Forge and Tool Work. 

10. Farm Machinery and Farm Motors, iy 2 . 

Botany 

1. Elementary Botany for Teachers. 

2. Introductory Plant Biology, 3. 



UNIVERSITY SUMMER SCHOOL 273 

Drawing and Handicrafts 

1. Elementary Drawing and Color. 

2. Advanced Drawing and Painting. 

3. Decorative Design. 

4. Blackboard Illustration. 

4. Handicrafts for Primary Grades. 

Vocational Industrial Education (Smith-Hughes) 

1. Auto Mechanics. 

2. Forging. 

3. Carpentry. 

4. Related Subjects. 

5. Pipe Fitting and Plumbing. 

6. Organization and Teaching of Evening, Part-time, and All-day 
classes. 

Education (General) 

1. Rural School Methods and Management. 

2. School Government and Efficiency. 

3. Teaching Primary Reading and Phonics. 

4. Elementary Reading and Literature. 

5. Primary Methods and the Demonstration School. 

6. History of Education, 1. 

7. Advanced Method, 1. 

8. Educational Psychology, 1. 

9. High School Administration, 1. 

10. School Supervision, 1. 

11. Educational Tests and Measurements. 

English Language and Literature 

1. Review for Teachers' Examinations. 

2. Language Lessons, Elementary. 

3. Composition and Grammar. 

4. Review for Teachers' High School License. 

5. English Grammar, advanced. 

6. High School Literature. 

7. Shakespeare, 1. 

8. Present Tendencies of American Fiction, 1. 

9. The Study of Poetry, 1. 
10. Journalism, 1. 

Expression, Literary and Dramatic 

1. Elementary Reading. 

2. Advanced Expression and Interpretation. 

3. Public Speaking. 

4. Story Telling. 

5. Children's Play and Story Hour. 



274 UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

French and Spanish 

1. Elementary Course if or Teachers and Preparatory Students. 

2. Second Year French (French I), 3. 

3. Elementary .Spanish. 

4. Second Year Spanish. 

Geography 

1. Geography Review for License Examinations. 

2. Primary Geography. 

3. Advanced Geography. 

4. Economic Geography with some attention to economic phases 
and results of the Great War. 

History and Government 

1. License Review Course in U. S. History. 

2. United States History. 

3. Georgia History. 

4. Civics. 

5. High School License Review. 

6. Issues of the Great War. The new political and linguistic 
map of Europe. 

7. American History. I — The Formative Period. II — The Jack- 
sonian Era and the Modern Period, 1 each. 

8. State and Federal Government, 1. 

9. Modern European History. I — The Napoleonic Period. II — 
Later Modern Period, 3; 1 y 2 each. 

Home Economics, Elementary 

1. Foods and Cookery for Rural Teachers. 

2. Principles of Cookery. 

3. Home Demonstration Work. 

4. Elementary Clothing and Handwork. 

Vocational Home Economics 

1. Vocational Education, Home Economics Methods, iy 2 . 

2. Textiles and Laundering, iy 2 . 

3. Designing for the Home, 1%. 

4. Problems in Feeding the Family, iy 2 . 

5. Home Sanitation and Hygiene, iy 2 . 

Latin 

1. First Year Latin, for teachers. 

2. Caesar. 

3. License Review. 

Mathematics 

1. License Review in Arithmetic. 

2. Elementary Arithmetic. 



UNIVERSITY SUMMER SCHOOL 275 

3. Advanced Arithmetic. 

4. Algebra. 

5. Plane Geometry (I and II). 

6. High School License Review. 

7. Plane Trigonometry, iy 2 . 

8. Graphic Algebra, 1%. 

9. Introduction to Calculus, 3. 

Music 

1. Public School Music. 

2. Chorus and Community Singing. 

Penmanship 

1. For Primary Teachers. 

2. For Elementary Teachers. 

Physical Education 

Four Courses. 

Physiology, Hygiene, Sanitation 
Two Courses. 

Physics 

1. High School Physics for Teachers. 

2. Laboratory for High School Teachers. 

3. General Science. 

4. Physics 1 (College Physics), 3. 

Graduate Courses for Master of Arts 

1. Latin. 

2. French. 

3. English Drama. 

4. American History. 

5. Educational Psychology. 

6. Mathematics. 

7. Agricultural Education. 

For Bulletin of fuller information, address 

T. J. WOOFTER, President. 



2 76 UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

DEGREES CONFERRED, 1918 



HONORARY DEGREES 

Doctor of Laws 

Judge George F. Gober, of Marietta. 

President Kenneth G. Matheson, of the Georgia School of Technolo; 

Doctor of Divinity 

Reverend John D. Wing, of Savannah. 

Doctor of Letters 

Irvin S. Cobb, of New York. 



r 



cum laude 



GRADUATES 

MASTER OF ARTS 

Thomas Prather Atkinson Emily Stewart Harrison 

Wellborn Chaudoin Carlton George Ephraim Usher 

MASTER OF SCIENCE IN AGRICULTURE 

Loy Edmund Rast Edward Scott Sell 

Cecil Norton Wilder 

BACHELOR OF ARTS 

Roger Hawes West, summa cum laude 

John Lawrence Brown, Jr. 
* Richard Winn Courts, Jr. 

Otto Raymond Ellars 

James Madden Hatcher 

Bertram Godwin Oberry 
Curtis Peter Baker Mack Matthews 

Stanley Spencer Bennet Hodges Timmerman Mobley 

Alfred Blalock Wesley Forte Nail 

James Richard Bowden Robert Loiwry Nicolson 

Abner Wellborn Calhoun Inman Padgett 

Robert Langdon Foreman, Jr. Calvin McClung Parsons 
Thomas Scott Holland Arthur Pew, Jr. 

Elmer Walter Jones John Walter Sheppard 

Dewey Knight Robert Edward Lee Spence, Jr. 

Edward Hinton Lasseter Augustus Hartsfield Stevens 

William Reville Mallory Samuel Gaines Story 

John Tomlinson Taylor, Jr. 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE 

Robert Brace Penn Crawford V 

Max Cutler | cum laude 

Irvine Phinizy J | 

Thomas Harrold, Jr. Alfred Witherspoon Scott 

William Earl Marks Francis Goddard Slack 

James Carlisle Phillips Farish F'urman Talley 



UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 277 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN CIVIL ENGINEERING 

Francis Bachman Sellers 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING 

William James Tidwell 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN AGRICULTURE 

Jesse James Benford Theodore Frederick Roesel, Jr. 

James Millard Bexley Louis Irvin Skinner 

William Earle Broach Judge Clifford Sorrells 

Samuel Craig, Jr. John Law Stevens 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN EDUCATION 

John Richard Strother 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN COMMERCE 

William Wells McManus Edwin Jonathan Perry 

John Edgar Patterson William Wimberly Wilson 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN MEDICINE 

Henry Thomas Burns 

BACHELOR OF LAWS 

Leonard Dennis Penny ) „„-«.i, ^„„„r.o 
T . , t, . , TT7 . > with honors 

Linton Burnside West \ 

George Washington Farkas 1 

Kenyon Mott, Jr. with distinction 

James William Smith 

Theodore Titus, Jr. 
Claude Brown Barrett John Ashley Osborne 

William Oswald Bozeman Richard Brevard Russell, Jr. 

William Oscar Cooper William Oscar Smith 

John Thomas Coyle John Crew Sullivan 

William Benjamin Jones William Southwell Tyson, 

John Ellis Mundy William Patillo Van Valkenburg 

Winfield Robison Nisbet George Hall Westbrook 

Jerome Palmer Williams 

GRADUATE IN PHARMACY 

Rufus David Allen Harold Clair Gilbert 



2 78 UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

AWARD OF PRIZES 

Sophomore Declamation Prize — F. W. Harrold. 

The Debaters' Medals — Freshman Class: E. H. Highsmith, B. C. 
Moss, J. E. Ross. Sophomore Class: F. W. Harrold, R. D. O'Cal- 
laghan, J. H. Young. 

The Ready Writer's Medal — O. E. Bright. 

The Willcox Prizes — French: R. B. Crawford, W. E. Marks. 

German: W. F. Nail. 

The Freshman Prize— G. J. Pahno. 

The W. J. Bryan Prize — R .H. West. 

The Horace Russell Prize in Psychology — Not awarded. 

The Walter B. Hill Prize in Ethics — W. M. Dallas. 

The Cadet Prize — O. E. Bright. 

The R. E. Park, Jr., Prize — Not awarded. 

The L. H. Charbonnier Prize — F. B. Slack. 

The Trustees' Prize in Agriculture — Not awarded. 

REGIMENT OF CADETS 

Roster of Officers and Non-Commissioned Officers 

Cadet Lieutenant-Colonel — D. P. Whelchel. 

Cadet Major, 1st Battalion — C. M. Candler. 

Cadet Major, 2nd Battalion — J. W .Abney. 

Cadet Captain and Adjutant of Regiment — W. H. Beck, Jr. 

Cadet 1st Lieutenant and Adjutant 1st Battalion — M. W. Clark. 

Cadet 1st Lieutenant and Adjutant 2nd Battalion — W, Dodson. 

Cadet Regimental Sergeant Major — F. L. Breen. 

Cadet Battalion Sergeant Major, 1st Battalion — H. S. Brannen. 

Cadet Battalion Sergeant Major, 2nd Battalion — C. Howell. 

Cadet Color Sergeant — C. Lott. 

Sadet Color Sergeant — D. D. Quillian. 

Cadet Drum Major — R. R. Stevenson. 

Cadet Captains 
Company "A" — W. I. Dooley. Company "D" — W. D. Heaton. 
Company "B" — H. S. Hastings. Company "E" — R. W. Martin 
Company "C" — F. Harwell. Company "F" — R. D. O'Callaghan 

Cadet First Lieutenants 

Company "A" — P. A. Hodgson. Company "D" — O. B. Roberts. 
Company "B" — S. M. Jordan. Company "E" — C. H. Wheatley. 
Company "C" — T. D. Matson. Company "F" — R. L. Hay. 

Cadet Second Lieutenants 
Company'* A" — Company "D" — 

Company "B" — Company "E" — 

Company "C" — Copmany "F" — W. B. Disbro, Jr. 



ACCREDITED SCHOOLS 353 

ACCREDITED FOUR- YEAR SCHOOLS, 1919 

12 to 20 Units Offered 

Correspondence relating to Accrediting of Schools should be ad- 
dressed to Joseph S. Stewart, Professor of Secondary Education, 
Athens, Ga. 
Graduation on 16 units in Group I, 14 in Group II, 12 in. Group III. 

Acworth High School, III W. W. Linton. 

Adairsville High School, II J. F. Williams. 

Adel High School, II Jason Scarboro. 

*Albany High School, I R. E. Brooks. 

*Americus High School, I J. E. Mathis. 

♦Ashburn High School, I A. G. Cleveland. 

*Athens High School, I E. B. Mell. 

Atlanta: 

*Boys High School, I Eugene Ragland. 

Commercial High School, II Annie T. Wise. 

*Girls High School, I Jessie Muse. 

♦Fulton County High School, I Wm. Hopkins. 

*Marist College, I (Private) : James A. Horton. 

North Ave. Pres. School, I (Private) Thursza Askew. 

♦Peacock School, I (Private). R. C. Little. 

♦Technological High School, I W. A. Sutton. 

♦Washington Seminary, I (Private) L. D. & E. B. Scott. 

Woodbury School, I (Private) Rosa Woodbury. 

Auburn: 

Christian Academy, II (Private) H. R. Garrett. 

Augusta: 

♦Richmond-Academy, I Geo. P. Butler. 

♦Tubman High School, I T. H. Garrett. 

Summerville Academy, II J. B. Lockhart. 

St. Joseph's Academy, II (Private) Sister Sacred Heart. 

♦Bainbridge High School, I E. Griggs Elcan. 

♦Barnesville, Gordon Institute, I E. T. Holmes. 

Baxley High School, I T. M. Purcell. 

Blackshear High School, II L. C. Evans. 

Blakely High School, II T. J. Townsend. 

Boston Hjgh School, II W. P. Brooks. 

Bowden High School, III C. K. Henderson. 

Bowman, Gibson-Mercer Acad., II (Private) _Lawson Brown. 

♦Brunswick, Glynn Academy, I N. H. Ballard. 

Buena Vista High School, II J. G. Colbert. 

Calhoun High School, II M. C. Allen. 

Camilla High School, I S. K. Tanner. 

Canton High School, II Paul Wheeler. 

Carrollton High School, I H. B. Adams. 

♦Cartersville High School, I H. L. Sewell. 

♦'Oedartown High School, I J. E. Purks. 

Chickamauga High School, II W. A. Wiley. 

Cochran High School, II W. E. Monts. 

College Park: 
♦Georgia Military Academy, I (Private) __J. C. Woodward. 
College Park High School, II L. O. Freeman. 

♦ On Southern List. 



354 UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

*Columbus High School, I T. C. Kendricks. 

*Secondary Industrial School, I J. B. Bagby. 

Lorena Hall, II (Private) Jessie Snydor. 

♦Commerce High School, I H. B. Carreker. 

Conyers High School, I G. W. Glausier. 

*Cordele High School, I H. B. Nicholson. 

Cornelia High School, III J. W. Marion. 

Covena, Gillis Springs Institute, III C. M. Carpenter. 

*Covington High School, I H. B. Robertson. 

Grawfordville High School, II R. D. McDowell. 

Cuthbert High School, III G. W. Marks. 

Dallas High School, III W. F. Tribble. 

*Dalton High School, I J. H. Watson. 

Darien High School, III S. A. Cooper. 

Dawson High School, I J. C. Dukes. 

Decatur High School, I E. E. Treadwell. 

Demorest: 

Piedmont Academy, I (Private) J. C. Rogers. 

Donaldsonville High School, II R. I. Knox. 

Douglasville High School, I E. D. Gunby. 

*Dublin High School, I Paul King. 

Eastman High School, I R. G. Hall. 

*Elberton High School, I W. A. Anderson. 

Ellaville High School, II S. E. Denton. 

Fairburn High School, II M. D. Collins. 

♦Fitzgerald High School, I J. W. Barnhill. 

Forsyth High School, I W. O. Perritt. 

*F'ort Valley High School, I Ralph Newton. 

Gainesville High School, II J. A. Mershon. 

Girard High School, II W. B. Lovett. 

Gray High School, III U. S. Lancaster. 

Graymount-Summit High School, I Ernest Anderson. 

♦Greensboro High School, I C. C. Wills. 

Greenville High School, II C. O. Stubbs. 

♦Griffin High School, I J. A. Jones. 

Harlem High School, III C. C. Hoover. 

Hartwell High School, I C. G. Powers. 

Hawkinsville High School. I J. I'. Lambert,. 

Hazelhurst High School, III G. P. Hunt. 

Hephzibah High School, II H. W. Sewell. 

Jackson High School, I W. P. Martin. 

Jefferson: Martin Institute, II L. F. Elrod. 

LaFayette High School, III W. H. McDaniel. 

♦LaGrange High School, I F. F. Rowe. 

Lawrenceville High School, I F. M. Hunter. 

L'thonia High School, III J- L. Sargent. 

*Locust Grove Institute, I (Private) Claud Gray. 

Loganville High School, III W. G. Coffee. 

Louisville High School, II C. B. Trammell. 

Lumpkin High School, III W. J. Dowd. 

Macon: 

♦Lanier High School, I R- J. Coates. 

Rutland High School, III Mrs. C. A. Stubbs. 

♦Madison High School, I J. H. Purks. 



♦ On Southern List. 



ACCREDITED SCHOOLS 355 

hester High School, II M. O. McCord. 

„ta High School, I W. T. Dumas. 

McRae: 

South Georgia College, I (Private) B. G. Childs. 

McDonough High School, II G. H. Boyd. 

Menlo High School, III J. L. Ray. 

Metter High School, II G. E. Usher. 

Millegeville: 

♦Georgia Military College, I J. H. Marshburn. 

Millen High School, I F. A. Brinson. 

Monroe High School, II C. P. Fawcett. 

Montezuma High School, II L. C. Corbett. 

Mt. Berry: 

The Berry School for Boys, I (Private) --Martha Berry. 
Mt. Vernon: 

Brewton-Parker Institute, I (Private) J. C. Brewton. 

*Moultrie High School, I J. H. Saxon. 

♦Newnan High School, I 25. F. Pickett. 

Norman Park Institute, I (Private) L. H. Browning. 

Ocilla High School, II W. T. Foster. 

Oxford: 

Emory Academy, I (Private).: W. A. Carlton. 

Pavo High School, I W. M. Parker. 

Pelham High School, I F. A. Moss. 

♦Quitman High School, I H. D. Knowles. 

Reynolds High School, III W. M. Pettis. 

Richland High School, II Guy Wells. 

Rochelle High School, III D. H. Standard. 

Rome: 

*High School, I W. P. Jones. 

*Darlington Academy, I (Private) J. M. Harden. 

Royston High School, III R. H. Moss. 

Sandersville High School, I C. B. Quillian. 

Sardis High School, III -J. H. Miser. 

Savannah: 

♦Senior High School, I Linwood Taft. 

♦Benedictine School, I (Private) F. Bernard. 

Myers School, II (Private) D. M. Myers. 

Pape School, I (Private) Nina Pape. 

Senoia High School, III J. T. Henry. 

Smithville High School, II !_J. H. Forbis. 

Social Circle High School, II J. A. Kelley. 

Sparks Collegiate Institute, I (Private) Leland Moore. 

Sparta High School, I J. N. Haddock. 

♦Statesboro High School, I R. M. Monts. 

Stillmore High School, I J. C. Langston. 

Stone Mountain High School, II J. T. DuPree. 

Sylvester High School, II J. T. Lowe. 

Swainsboro High School, I C. A. Keith. 

Tennille High School, II G. G. Maughon. 

Thomson High School, I N. E. Ware. 

Thomasville High School, I B. B. Broughton. 

♦Thomaston: R. E. Lee Institute, I C. W. Reid. 

Tifton High School, I A. H. Moon. 



* 



* On Southern List. 



356 



UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 



*Toccoa High School, I J. 

*Valdosta High School, I W 

Vidalia High School, II W 

Waleska: Reinhardt Institute, I (Private) __T. 
♦Warrenton High School, I G. 

Washington High School, I J. 

Waverly Hall High School, III I. 

*Waycross: High School, I B. 

Piedmont Institute, II (Private) J. 

Waynesboro High School, I J. 

West Point High School, I W 

♦Winder High School, I J. 

Woodbury High School, III G. 

Wrens High School, I C. 

Statesboro: 

1st District Agricultural School, 
Tifton: 

2nd District Agricultural School, 
Americus: 

3rd District Agricultural School, 
Carrollton: 

4th District Agricultural School, 
Monroe: 

5th District Agricultural School, 
Barnesville: 

6th District Agricultural School, 
Powder Springs: 

7th District Agricultural School, 
Madison: 

8th District Agricultural School, 
Clarkesville: 

9th District Agricultural School, 
Granite Hill: 

10th District Agricultural School, I E. 

Douglas: 

11th District Agricultural School, I L. 



F. 



.S. 



H, 



B. 



I. Allmar 
O. Rob 
L. Downs. 

M. Sullivan. 
S. Roach. 

W. Moseley. 

S. Ingram. 

E. Flowers. 

F. Watson. 
T. Lance. 

. P. Thomas. 
P. Cash. 
J. Gearin. 
C. McCollum. 

M. Rowan. 
L. Lewis. 
M. Collum. 
H. Melson. 
H. Walker. 
O. Galloway. 
R. Hunt. 
F. Gay. 
A. Wells. 
C. Merry. 
C. Proctor. 



THREE- YEAR HIGH SCHOOLS 
10 to 12 units only to be allowed 



Bartow High School E. 

Brooklet High School J. 

Broxton High School O. 

Buford High School W 

Byromville High School J. 

Cairo High School J. 

Chipley High School___ J. 

Claxton High School A. 

Comer High School J. 

Eatonton High School T. 

Edison High School O. 

Fort Gaines High School R. 

Glennville High School J. 

Grantville High School R. 



C. Salter. 
W. Davis. 
C. Campbell. 
. N. Nunn. 
W. Smith. 
G. Christian. 
J. Binford. 
W. Strozier. 
W. Adams. 
P. Tribble. 
F. Helm. 
E. Ozier. 
M. Harvey. 
O. Powell. 



* On Southern List. 



i 



ACCREDITED SCHOOLS 



357 



I 



Hampton High School Miss Lucy Richards. 

Hogansville High School T. A. Clower. 

Jesup High School Anna K. Clark. 

Kirkwood High School W. M. Rainey. 

Lavonia High School Lamar Ferguson. 

Leesburg High School R. P. Ford. 

Mansfield High School E. N. Reynolds. 

Marshallville High School M. C. Austin. 

Maysville High School E. H. Beck. 

Meigs High School T. T. Benton. 

Monticello High School Van Fletcher. 

Mt. Zion Seminary (Private) Leo Trimble. 

Nashville High School J. L. Strozier. 

Perry High School N. H. Reid. 

Plains High School T. J. Barrett. 

Reidsville High School Hessie Newton. 

Rockmart High School Lola L. Smith. 

Rutledge High School C. W. Peacock. 

Shellman High Schoc 1 F. K. McGee. 

Soperton High School B. H. McLarty 

St .Mary's High School C. A. Brook?. 

Sylvania High School C. A. Strickland. 

Tallapoosa High School A. L. Bre;ver. 

Unadilla High School V. H. MoKee. 

Vienna High School -J. M. Ri&.zrO 

Winterville High School J. W- W : lliani3. 

Wrightsville High School J. 0. McMahon. 












INDEX 



Pago 
Accredited Schools, list of _ _ _ 353 
Ad mission Requirements— 

Franklin College ______ 28 

The A. & M. College _s 

College of Agriculture _ _ 28, 11^ 
Law Department _ _ _ _28, 248 

Pharmacy Department _ .28. 259 
Advanced Standing, Admission to 2',) 
Advisers __________4< 

Agriculture, College of _ _ _ _ 94 

Agricultural Education _ _ _ _ 135 

Agricultural Engineering _ _ _ 137 
Agronomy . _ _ 124, 174, 178 , 237 
Alumni Society - _ _ _ I 1 _.'"_ 151 
Animal Husbandry 129, 175. 178, 240 
Astron _______ _ti ( .), 90 

Athleti* _ 40, 50 

Iliologi il Laboratories _ _ _ _ 21 

Biolog' ______ _58, 82, 237 

Boar nd Lodging _____ 42 

J- of Trustees — ■ 

< _-ge of Agriculture _ _ _ _ 94 

1 versify _________ 8 

<;v., iv ______ _ 58, 82, 2:57 

i-otan_Mi Laboratories _ _ _ _ 21 

-''•own '-nnd 43 

tin U dings Deserii ion of _ _ _ 20 

'-'• _ . 3 

Cei i, ['roo jction _______ 174 

Certificate _kimi«sion on _ _ _ 24 
Chemical I il >riee _ _ _ _ 21 

Chemi • .«--__ 59, 83, 132. 237 
( vil K ing _ 

vil E gineering 21 

liege ol A.l-: ii-nlt u 
Expense and Fees . _ _ _ 113 
Facub ______ _ _ itr, 

Hi • .. of . _ _ 100 

__________ 94 

tuerce ________ 216 

■ 

19 

--_--__ 10 
< onaft-oned si u<i___t» 

Cotton Industry _____ i_:, I. 

Courses of Instruction — 
Franklin College ______ 58 

The A. & M. College _ _ _ _ 82 

College of Agriculture _ 124, 173 
School of Commerce _ _ _ _ 218 

Law Department ______ 249 

Pharmacy Department _ _ _ 2<>o 

Dairying __________ 132 

Degree, Requirements for 

53, 56, 76 128, 150, 155, 165 
Graduate __________ 228 

Law _____________ 252 

Pharma y __________ 259 

Dining Rail _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ m 

f discipline __________ __ 
>r;i\ving _ _ _______ 86 

onomics __________ 21S 

nation _ _ _ .. _ _ 71 218 

Bducatii a School ('_____ 205 

Electrical Ln._iin-.-r. -■ _ _ _ _ ss 

Electrical Enginei 
Laboratories _____ oo 

English ________ : 

English Language .-__.___ 
Entrance Requirements _ _ 28 

Bn t ranee EJxn mina tions . 2."! 

Law Department _ _ _ . 248 

equipment ________ _mi 

Examinations for Entrance _ 24 

_8 • 

Vndei graduate l ►epnrl mental 
■rnv Department _ _ _ _ _ '-''. 
■"■lev Department - _ _ 

.._____ 191 



Pago 
Faculty- 
University __*________ 12 

Law Department _______ 248 

harmacy Department _ _ _ 2.")'.) 
.Summer school _ _ _ _ _ _ _ 265 

Farm, Description of _ _ _ _ _ 109 

Fees, Special _________ 43 

forestry -------- -141, 177 

Franklin College- 
Faculty __________ 52 

French ________ _72, 231 

Geology __________ 62 

German ________ __02, .231 

Government __________ 7 

Graduate School ________ 224 

Greek _________ _G2, 230 

Historical Statement ______ 4 

History ________ _63, 23:t 

Home Economics ________ 155 

Honors and Appointments _ _ _ 47 
In Law Department _____ 253 

Horticulture _ _ _ _ _141, 175, 239 

Italian 73 

Laboratories. Description of 21, 10_ 
Laboratory l'ees _______ 4.S 

Latin 00, 230 

Law Department _______ 248 

Library 23, 102 

Literary Societies _______ 50 

Lodging. Cost of _______ _ 41 

Mathematics 66, 235 

-Medals 48 

Medicine ____________ 81 

M Pilar _______ 68 

Uio-.oar Course in Agriculture 17.". 

Organizations ________ 50, 112 

P irmacy Department _____ 2."V.> 

PI ilosophy _ _ 71, 233 

Physical Laboratories _____ 21 

Physics 69, 90, 236 

Prizes 47, 115 

Public Speaking _______ 01 

Publications - 
I'.y the University _____ 49 

• h Collegf of Agriculture 49 
Students _ _ _ _ _ _ 50 

i er ol _ _ _ 280 

lirementS for Admission 

ee Admission Requirements). 
ice Languages _ _ _ _ 72 231 
s Degrees — 

_______ 53 

B.J _ 56 

B.S enendj ______ tc> 

B.S. 'i vil Engineering) _ _ 78 
B.S. il etrlcal -in gineering). 79 

gS. U siry, 1 _ 150 

ILS. K • |-,-».) _ SO 

B.S. (A culture) _____ 123 

U.S. i Home Bionomics) _ _ _ 155 
Scholarships _ _ _ 43 ut 

Societies Literary "_"_"_ _ _ 50 
Society ol Alumni « _____ r>l 

Spanish _____ 7:; 

Student Organization :,n ua 

Students, Register of _ _ 2sr. 
Summer School ______ _ J04 

Support of the University (i 

Trustees • 

■'■■-dtv _________ ,s 

Colleg< loaltnre _ _ . <»4 

Tuition ■ 

Non-r.sidents of Georgia _ _ ,., 

Law Department _ _ _i" 

Pharmacy 1 >eparl • 111 •»(;_ 

inary Medicine _ _ _ _ 1 17 

1 Courses i" Agriculture 190 

c A. _ go 

Zool -y ______ ___ 58, 82 



/ 



/ 





r 




FEBRUARY, 1918 



Bulletin of the University of Georgia 



Volume XVIII 



Number 2 



THE 
UNIVERSITY SUMMER SCHOOL 



FOR TEACHERS 




Winning for Education and Democracy 



ATHENS, GEORGIA 

JULY 1st TO AUGUST 3rd 1918 



Entered at the Post Office at Athens, Ga., as Second Class Matter, August 81, 1906. 
under Act of Congress of July 16th, 1904. Issued Monthly by the University. 

Serial Number 286 



SUMMER SCHOOL CALENDAR 



Saturday, June 29 . -Dormitories open. Supper served. 

Monday, July 1 _ _ -Registration begins; 8:30 P. M., Opening ex- 
ercises; the Governor; the State Superin- 
tendent of Schools; the Chancellor of the 
University; a Member of the Board of 
Trustees; the Presidents of the State Col- 
lege of Agriculture, the State Normal 
Schools, the other branches of the Univer- 
sity System, invited for five minutes greet- 
ings. 

Tuesday, July 2 _ Classes begin. 

Thursday, July 4 Patriotic celebration, with such military fea- 
tures as may be most expedient. Last year 
with General Leonard Wood and more thaa 
four thousand people, the occasion was a 
memorable one. 

Tuesday to Friday, 

July 16-19 Rural Life Conferences. 

Thursday, Aug. 1 Graduation exercises. 

Friday and Saturday, 

August 2-3 _ _ _ .State Examinations for Licenses. 

Sunday, August 4 . -Dormitories for Teachers Close. 

Saturday, August 24 -College Courses Close for Summer. 

Every Saturday _ - -Recreation evening. Songs, games, partici- 
pation, varied with patriotic exercises or 
selections with distinguished humorists, or 
adapted to the needs of the hour. 

Special Days 

and Weeks _ - _ _A number of special occasions may be an- 
ticipated, such as the Red Cross Week 
with Dr. Stockton Axson; the Child Wel- 
fare Week with Miss Lathrop, head of the 
Childrens' Bureau at Washington, and Dr. 
Bradley; the Devereux Players and others, 
all subject to the efficient working of the 
Summer School plans. 



The University Summer School 

FOUR PRIZES FOR SONGS. 

For the best University Summer School song four prizes will be 
given: $2 5 for the first; $15 for the second; $10 for the third; 
and $5 for the fourth, all offered by friends of the Summer School, 
under the following conditions: 

Words to be original and may be set to new music or sung to old 
favorites, preferably such as "Auld Lang Syne," "Old Black Joe." 

The theme is the Summer School but should embody the ideals of 
"teacherhood," loyalty to school, state, nation and joyous service. 

Open to any person, anywhere, any age with only the condition 
that the contestant be enrolled in the Summer School, which is of, 
by, and for, its students. 

The award will be made by the faculties of music and English, 
and songs published in the Summer School News, whether they win 
or not. One song will then be adopted as the official song. 

Begin on it now; do not wait to begin what ought to be a difficult 
but profitable and pleasant task. 

SING 

Not one teacher of the hundreds of "Glory-to-Old-Georgia" teach- 
ers but will sing "The Star Spangled Banner" this year! They will 
sing it in the school with their children; they will sing it with their 
soldier boys in the camps; they will sing it with vim and meaning. 

For the University Summer School the stanzas of the songs below 
will be the nucleus. Practice them now and again. In addition to 
these the new marching and camp songs will be popular favorites 
and the Georgia song book will prove most helpful as usual. 

THE STAR SPANGLED BANNER. 

1. Oh! say, can you see by the dawn's early light, 

What so proudly we hail'd at the twilight's last gleaming, 
Whose broad stripes and bright stars, thro' the perilous fight, 

O'er the ramparts we watch'd, were so gallantly streaming? 
And the rocket's red glare, the bombs bursting in air, 
Gave proof thro' the night that our flag was still there! 
Oh! say, does that star-spangled banner yet wave 
O'er the land of the free and the home of the brave! 

3. Oh! thus be it ever when free men shall stand 

Between their loved home and war's desolation; 
Blest with vict'ry and peace, may the heav'n rescued land 

Praise the Power that hath made and preserved us a nation 
Then conquer we must, when our cause it is just, 
And this be our motto. "In God is our trust." 
And the star-spangled banner in triumph shall wave 
O'er the land of the free and the home of the brave! 

(Over) 



The University Summer School 

AMERICA. 

My country, 'tis of thee, 
Sweet land of liberty, , 

Of thee I sing, 
Land where my fathers died! 
Land of the pilgrim's pride! 
From ev'ry mountain side 

Let freedom ring. 

My native country, thee, 
Land of the noble free, 

Thy name I love; 
I love thy rocks and rills, 
Thy woods and templed hills; 
My heart with rapture thrills, 

Like that above. 

Let music swell the breeze, 
And ring from all the trees 

Sweet freedom's song; 
Let mortal tongues awak; 
Let all that breathe partake; 
Let rocks their silence break, 

The sound prolong. 

"ALMA MATER." 

From the hills of Georgia's northland 

Beams thy noble brow, 
And the sons of Georgia rising 

Pledge with sacred vow. 

Chorus : 

Alma Mater, thee we'll honor, 

True and loyal be, 
Ever crowned with praise and glory 

Georgia, hail to thee! 

'Neath the pine trees' stately shadow 

Spread thy riches rare. 
And thy sons, dear Alma Mater, 

Will thy treasure share. 

Through the ages, Alma Mater, 

Men will look to thee — 
Thou the fairest of the Southland, 

Georgia's Varsity. 

GLORY TO "OLD GEORGIA!" 

Glory, glory to "Old Georgia," 
Glory, glory to "Old Georgia," 
Glorv, glory to "Old Georgia," 
G-(E)-0-R-G-T-A! 



FEBRUARY, 1918 



Bulletin of the University of Georgia 

Volume XVIII Number 2 

THE 
UNIVERSITY SUMMER SCHOOL 

FOR TEACHERS 







Si78V/ 



*°*107SS/* 



r„in 



Winning for Education and Democracy 



ATHENS, GEORGIA 

JULY 1st TO AUGUST 3rd 1918 



Entered at the Post Olhce at Athens, 6a., as Second Class Matter, August 31, 1D05. 
under Act of Congress of July lGth, 1904. Issued Monthly hy the University. 



Serial Number 286 



THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SCHOOL 



BOARD OF ADMINISTRATION 

David C. Barrow. LL.l)., 

Chancellor of the University, President of the Board. 

Marion Luther Brittaix, A.M., 

State Superintendent of Schools. 

Jere M. Pound, LL.D., 

President of the State Normal School. 

Charles M. Snellixg, D.Sc., 

Dean of the University and President of Franklin College. 

Andrew M. Soule, D.Sc, LL.D., F.R.S.A., 

President of the State College of Agriculture. 

Thomas' J. Woofter, LL.D., 

Dean of the Peabody School of Education, University of 
Georgia. Superintendent Emeritus of the Summer 

School. 

Howard W. Odum, Ph.D.. 

Superintendent of the Summer School; Secretary of the 

Board. 



OFFICERS 

David C. Barrow, LL.D. President 

Chancellor of the University. 

Howard W. Odum, Ph.D. Supt rint< ndi nl 

Professor of Educational Sociology and Rural Education, 

University of Georgia; Home Service Supervisor, Bureau 

of Civilian Relief, The American Red Cross. 

Roswell P. Stephens, Pfti.D. Assistant Superintendent 

Associate Professor of Mathematics, University of Georgia. 

Horace B. Ritchie, A.B. Assistant Superintendent 

Dean and Professor of Psychology, State Normal School. 

Willis H. Bocock, LL.D. Din dor of Gradual < Work 

Dean of the Graduate School and Professor of Greek. 

University of Georgia. 

Robert S. Pond, Ph.D. Director of College Credit Work- 

Adjunct Professor of .Mathematics, University of Georgia. 

John R. Fain. U.S. Director of Agricultural Work 

Professor of Agronomy, State College of Agriculture. 



4 The University Summer School 

Thomas W. Reed, A.M. Registrar and Treasurer 

Registrar and Treasurer of the University of Georgia. 

Robert E, Park, Litt.D. Director University Dormitories 

Professor of English Literature, University of Georgia. 

Alexander Rhodes, A.B. Director Normal School Dormitories 
Business Manager State Normal School. 

Edward Lee Floyd, A*M. Assistant 

Beatrice M. McGarrah Assistant 

Fannie Mae Shouse Secretary 



THE SUMMER SCHOOL FACULTY 

David C. Barrow, LL.D. Lecturer 

Chancellor of the University of Georgia. 

Gertrude A. Alexander, A.M. Primary Reading, Phonics 

Head of Department of Expression, State Normal School. 

Stockton Axson, Ph.D. Lecturer 

Secretary of the American Red Cross. 

Edith Andrews Household Arts 

District Supervisor Home Economics, State College 

of Agriculture. 

Mary A. Bacon Bird Life and Nature Study 

Author and Nature Student. 

Mary E. Banks Penmanship 

Southern Representative Palmer Company. 

Nellie Peters Black Lecturer 

President Georgia Federation of Women's Clubs. 

Willis H. Bocock, LL.D. Greek 

Dean of the Graduate School and Professor of Greek, 

University of Georgia. 

Marion L. Brittain, A.M. Lecturer 

State Superintendent of Schools. 

R. P. Brooks, Ph.D. Georgia History 

DeRenne Professor of Georgia History, University of 
Georgia. (On leave of absence, 1918). 

Peter F. Brown, A.B. Elementary Language, Grammar 

Professor of English, State Normal School. 



The University Summer School 5 

Duncan Burnet, A.M. Library Management 

Head Librarian, Peabody Library, University of Georgia. 

Frances Sage Bradley, M.D. Child Welfare 

Specialist, Children's Bureau, Washington, D. C. 

John P. Campbell, Ph.D. Physiology, General Biology 

Professor of Biology, University of Georgia. 

J. Phil Campbell, B.S.A. Agricultural Clubs 

Director of Extension Work, State College of Agriculture. 

J. W. Cantrell Physics 

Tutor in Physics, University of Georgia. 

Leonidas M. Carter, B.S. Agricultural Chemistry 

Junior Professor of Soil Chemistry, State College of 

Agriculture. 

Carolyn Cobb Dramatic Interpretation 

Reader and Teacher of Dramatic Art, Atlanta. 

Sara Charlton Physical Education 

Director Physical Education, Lucy Cobb Institute. 

George A. Crabb, B.S.A. Agriculture 

Junior Professor of Agronomy, in Charge of Soils, State 

College of Agriculture. 

Mary E. Creswell Home Economics 

Director of Home Economics, State College of Agriculture. 

i- 

Willis J. Cunningham Public School Music 

Director Public School Music, Asheville, N. C. 

Lois P. Doodle Girls' Club Work 

Assistant State Supervisor of Home Economics, State 

College of Agriculture. 

James E. Downing Boys' Club Work 

Assistant State Supervisor of Pig Clubs in Georgia. 

Howard D. Dozier, Ph.D. Economics and Commerce 

Associate Professor of Commerce, University of Georgia. 

Louise Dorou:h Story Telling 

Teacher in Primary Grades, Atlanta City Schools. 

Marion DuBose, A.M. Advanced German 

Adjunct Professor of German, University of Georgia. 

M. L. Duggax Lecturer on Rural School ProbU ms 

State Rural School Agent. 



Tht University Summer School 7 

Dan H. DuPree, M.D. Advising and Consulting Physician 

Physician in Charge of Infirmary, University of Georgia. 

(On leave, 1918, U. S. Army). 

D. L. Earnest, A.M. StaU Professional Reading Course 

Professor of Natural Science, State Normal School. 

Austin S. Edwards, Ph.D. Psychology, Child Study 

Associate Professor of Psychology, and Director of 

Psychology Laboratory, University of Georgia. 

(On leave of absence in National Army, Medical Corps). 

John R. Fain, B.S. Agriculture 

Professor of Agronomy, State College of Agriculture. 

John W. Firor, B.S. Horticulture 

Junior Professor of Horticulture, State College of Agri- 
culture. (On leave of absence in U. S. Army). 

Harold W. Foght, LL.D. Lecturer 

Specialist in Rural Education, United States Bureau 

of Education. 

John K. Giles, B.S. A. Corn Clubs 

State Supervisor of Agricultural Clubs. 

George D. Goddard Lecturer 

Special Supervisor of State Schools. 

Ozias T. Goodwin, B.S. Animal Husbandry 

Adjunct Professor of Dairy Husbandry, State College 

of Agriculture. 

Agnes C. Goss Librarian 

Librarian, State Normal School. 

Leroy C. Hart, B.S. E.E. Manual Training 

Professor of Agricultural Engineering, State College of 

Agriculture. 

Linville L. Hendren, Ph.D. Physics, General Science 

Professor of Physics, University of Georgia. 

( 'ornelius J. II i:\t\yolk, U.S.. A.M., Psychology and Education 
Professor of Education, Peabody School of Education. 

Parna B. Hill Household Arts 

Instructor in Household Arts, State Normal School. 

Annie Mae Holliday Drawing 

Instructor in Drawing, State Normal School. 

T. E. HOLLINGSWORTH, A. I \. Aril him tic 

Professor of Mathematics, State Normal School. 



8 The University Summer School 

William D. Hooper, A.M. Latin 

Professor of Latin, University of Georgia. 

W. H. Howell, B.S.A. Short Courses 

Scientific Assistant in Dairy Husbandry, College of 

Agriculture. 
(On leave of absence in U. S. Army). 

Hal Hulsey, A.B. English 

Tutor in English, University of Georgia. 

Theodore H. Jack, Ph.D. History 

Professor of History, Emory University. 

Louise Johnson, A.B. Geography 

Instructor of Geography, South Georgia Normal School. 

J. Y. Joyner, LL.D. Lecturer 

State Superintendent of Schools, North Carolina. 

Fort E. Land, A.B. Rural Life and Education 

State Supervisor of Schools. 

Julia C. Lathrop Lecturer 

Chief of Children's Bureau, United States Department 

of Labor. 

Joseph C. Logan Lecturer 

Director, Bureau of Civilian Relief, Southeastern Division, 

The American Red Cross. 

J. Lustrat, Bach. es. Lett. French 

Professor of Romance Languages, University of Georgia. 

Mary D. Lyndon, A.M. Rhetoric and Story-Telling 

Instructor in English, Lucy Cobb Institute. 

Thomas H. McHatton, B.S., Sc.D., 

Floriculture, Landscape Gardening 
Professor of Horticulture, State College of Agriculture. 
(On leave of absence in U. S. Army). 

J. H. T. McPjierson, Ph.D. History, Civics 

Professor of History and Political Science, University 

of Georgia. 

Henry T. Maddux, A.B., B.S.A. Agricultural Journalism 

Editor, State College of Agriculture. 

Robt. D. Maltby, B.S. Vocational Education 

State Supervisor of Vocational Schools for Georgia. 

J. 0. Martin Rural Life and Education 

State Supervisor of Schools. 



The University Summer School 9 

Mildred Mell . Assistant Librarian 

Assistant Librarian, University of Georgia. 

Harold D. Meyer, A.M. Georgia History 

Acting Professor of History, State Normal School. 

(On leave of absence in Army Y. M. C. A.) 

A. H. Moon, B.S. Arithmetic, School Laics 

Superintendent of City Schools, Baxley, Ga. Member of 

State Board of Education. 

H. A. Nix, A.M., LL.B. Law 

Assistant Professor of Law, University of Georgia. 

Howard W. Odum, Ph.D. Rural Life and Education 

Professor of Educational Sociology and Rural Education; 

Superintendent of the Summer School; Home Service 

Supervisor, Bureau of Civilian Relief, The 

American Red Cross. 

Robert E. Park, Litt.D. Literary Criticism 

Professor of English Literature, University of Georgia. 

Wm. 0. Payne, A.M. European History 

Associate Professor of History, University of Georgia. 

Ulrich B. Phillips, Ph.D. Lecturer 

Professor of History, University of Michigan. 

Robert S. Pond, Ph.D. Advanced Mathematics 

Adjunct Professor of Mathematics, University of Georgia. 

Jere M. Pound, LL.D. Lecturer 

President of the State Normal School. 

R. H. Powell, A.M. Lecturer 

President of the South Georgia Normal School. 

Erna Proctor, A.M. Household Arts 

District Supervisor Home Economics Extension, State 

College of Agriculture. 

Edith Pratz Physical Education 

Direitor of Physical Training, South Georgia Normal 

School. 

Chas. A. Prosser, Ph. D., Lecturer 

Head of the National Vocational Board, Washington. 

Rafael W. Ramirez, A.B. Spanish 

Professor of Spanish and Latin in Glynn Academy, 

Brunswick, Georgia. 

L. E. Rast, B.S. A. Cotton Grading 

Junior Professor of Cotton Industry, State College of 

Agriculture. 



10 The University Summer School 

Horace B. Ritchie, A.B. School Management 

Dean and Professor of Psychology, the State Normal School. 

Helen King Robinson Lecturer 

Member of Congress from Colorado. 

Mildred Lewis Rutherford Lecturer 

President Lucy Cobb Institute. 

Steadman V. Sanford, Litt.D. 

English Language and Literature 
Professor of English Language, University of Georgia. 

E. S.. Sell, B.S.A. School and Home Gardening 

Professor of Agriculture, State Normal School. 

Elizabeth Winburn Sinclair Reading 

Teacher of Expression. 

Hoyle Skinner Household Arts 

District Supervisor Home Economics Extension, State 

College of Agriculture. 

Laura M. Smith, B.S.Ed. Primary Methods 

Supervisor of Elementary Schools, Atlanta City Schools; 

In charge of Thrift Campaign in Georgia Schools. 

Henry L. Southwick, LL'.D. Lecturer 

President of The Emerson School of Oratory. 

Andrew M. Soule, Sc.D., LL.D., F.R.S.A. Lecturer 

President of the State College of Agriculture. 

Carl W. Steed, A.M. English Literature 

Professor of English, Mercer University. 

Roswell P. Stephens, Ph.D. Mathematics 

Associate Professor of Mathematics, University of Georgia. 

Joseph S. Stewart, A.M, Ped.D. High School Administration 

Professor of Secondary Education, University of Georgia. 

State Vocational Education Inspector. State High 

School Visitor. 

Mary Priciiard Taylor Drawing 

Teacher in Virginia Summer Normals. 

E. Page Tracy, C.E. Industrial Education 

Director of Department of Industrial Education, Georgia 

School of Technology. 



The University Summer School 11 

Earle G. Welch, B.S.A.E. Agricultural Engineering 

Adjunct Professor of Agricultural Engineering, S*tate 

College of Agriculture. 

Roosevelt P. Walker, A.M. English 

Adjunct Professor of English, University of Georgia. 

Henry C. White, Sc.D., LL.D. Chemistry 

Professor of Chemistry, Terrell Professor of Agricultural 

Chemistry, University of Georgia. 

Bessie Stanley Wood Home Economics 

Assistant State Supervisor of Home Economics, State 

College of Agriculture. 

J. H. Wood, B.S.A. Poultry Industry 

Adjunct Professor in Poultry Husbandry. State College of 

Agriculture. 

John F. Wood, A.M. History of Education 

Professor of Psychology and Education, South Georgia 

Normal School. 

William A. Wobsham, A.M. Chemistry 

Professor of Agricultural Chemistry, State College of 

Agriculture. 

John T. Wheeler, B.S. Vocational Education 

Professor of Agricultural Education, State College of 

Agriculture. 

May Ziegler, A.B. Geography 

Instructor in Child Study, State Normal School. 



12 The University Summer School 

GENERAL INFORMATION 



THE PURPOSE AND SPIRIT OF THE SUMMER SCHOOL, 

The University Summer School for Teachers constitutes one of 
the larger branches of service which the State University offers to 
the educational interests of Georgia. Its purpose is to meet the 
growing needs of public education in the state and to adapt its work 
to include all that is best in instruction, inspiration, and in the spirit 
of Georgia and Southern institutions. The work of the Summer 
School, therefore, is planned primarily to meet the needs of Georgia 
teachers and educational leaders; it is well adapted also to the 
needs of teachers and leaders from other Southern States, as has 
been demonstrated by the constant growth of the school and the 
attendance from other states. The ideals tend to promote thorough- 
ness, enthusiasm and the spirit of service that is found in all pro- 
gressive preparation for the great and fascinating business of teach- 
ing. That Georgia recognizes the training of her teachers as one of 
her biggest problems of educational statesmanship is evidenced by 
the existence of so large and enthusiastic a body of teachers, made 
possible by the combined cooperation of educational and legislative 
forces in the state. Such a condition promises well for the future 
of Georgia schools. 

The program of the 1918 Summer School is offered with the 
hope that it will meet the needs of all those who may avail them- 
selves of its services. Its invitations are extended to many classes: 

To teachers and prospective teachers who wish to improve their 
scholarship and methods. 

To teachers and prospective teachers who wish to prepare for the 
license examinations under expert direction. 

To teachers who wish to prepare themselves in special suhjects 
and for departmental work. 

To teachers who do not now hold college degrees but who wish 
to utilize the summer months to obtain college credits. 

To teachers who hold college degrees but wish to do graduate 
work leading to higher degrees. 

To principals, supervisors and superintendents who desire addi- 
tional help in school organization, administration and supervision or 
who wish to continue graduate work. 

To all teachers who wish to continue their growth and training 
and at the same time to come in contact with the best teachers, vis- 
iting experts and pleasant associations. 

To college students and prospective college students who wish to 
take advantage of the summer sessions to gain time, make up defi- 
ciencies or work off requirements |Por advanced degrees. 



The University Summer School 13 

Finally, to all others who may avail themselves of what the Sum- 
mer School has to offer in continuation education or general culture. 

SPECIAL 1918 OBLIGATIONS. 

Because this is an unusual year the 1918 Summer School will 
have unusual obligations and special opportunities. 

The Teacher and the School. In times of war the danger of allow- 
ing school standards to be lowered must be overcome. The army 
and navy have drawn heavily from our men teachers; the civil ser- 
vice has attracted many women teachers. We must help reinforce 
the teachers' ranks with the best equipped teachers. We have no 
choice, we must. 

The College Student. Many college boys wish to complete as much 
work looking toward graduation as possible before they are called 
to the service or to industry. Many women wish to equip them- 
selves for special service and want college work. The need for physi- 
cians and, therefore, pre-medical work, is urgent. The Summer 
School must, therefore, do its part. 

The Larger . University Interests. The entire University system 
throughout the State has given freely of its students, its faculty, 
and its time and energy to serving the Nation in a time of stress. It 
has had its energies and resources taxed and its student bodies 
drafted. Believing that the larger educational ideals of service are 
sound, it becomes the privilege and pleasure of the University Sum- 
mer School to enlarge these services and to reinforce the ranks of 
students who may take advantage of the coming years to prepare for 
the future service of the State and Nation. 

Winning for Education and Democracy. Nothing is so important 
as the future. The future must be and will be won. Standing by 
the Government then becomes the first slogan of the Summer School. 
And the Government must stand by its teachers. Standing by the 
Teacher in these days of needed encouragement and support be- 
comes one of the high marks of Summer School purpose. If ever 
the School was needed, it is now and, therefore, the special obliga- 
tion of the University Summer School to stand by the School will 
not be overlooked. School consciousness as a part of every com- 
munity becomes a necessity. And finally, the emphasis upon the rec- 
ognition of higher education for women was never so appropriate as 
now. The University Summer School for Teachers recognizes with 
respectful loyalty the difficult part that woman must play in this 
war and the deserved recognition she is receiving everywhere. 
Standing by Woman's Education is, therefore, not a matter of chiv- 
alry of words but of simple opportunity and obligation. 



14 The University Summer School 

COLLEGE AND UNIVERSITY CREDIT. 

Special emphasis has been placed this summer upon the work of 
college and university grade. Many University students as well as 
men and women of other institutions, desire to complete as much 
work as possible looking toward graduation before they are called 
to service or industry. The University Summer School is desirous 
of aiding them in this work and, therefore, offers a larger number 
of courses granting college credit. Many teachers who do not hold 
degrees wish to continue their study to become better teachers but 
also wish credits toward degrees at this or other institutions. These 
are welcomed to the courses. Due to the late closing of many of 
our city schools and the requested economy in travel, many teachers 
now working toward degrees at Columbia and Chicago Universities 
may not be able to attend the summer sessions. These institutions 
have very liberally agreed to accept full credits for work done at the 
University of Georgia Summer School, where this work is accepted 
by the University of Georgia as standard college work. Special em- 
phasis is, therefore, laid upon making these courses of standard 
quality and a special invitation is extended to all teachers who can- 
not continue their work as planned to store up these credits at 
"Georgia" for use later. Other institutions will grant similar cred- 
its. It is important that those who wish to take advantage of this 
opportunity examine the courses offered to see if they may make 
suitable selections and if not to write to the Superintendent making 
further inquiries as to courses wanted. 

The college credit courses are of two kinds. One series runs the 
entire summer session for which a credit of from two to three hours 
may be received. The other series extends through the regular five 
weeks' Summer School for Teachers, running six days a week, and 
granting credit of from one to one and a half hours a course. In 
addition to the regular six hours each week those who work for 
college credit are required to prepare special additional work as in- 
dicated by the instructor and are permitted to take only two courses 
where full maximum credit is desired. The amount of credit re- 
ceived with each course may be learned from the descriptive state- 
ment. Any college credit course may be counted as credit toward 
the Summer School diploma when required courses have been taken. 

On registration days, those who wish to register for college credit 
will see Dr. R. S. Pond, who will advise concerning all details, such 
as entrance requirements, advance standing in the University, and 
requirement for the several degrees. A special registration card 
will ibe isssued and this will admit to any college credit courses for 
which the student has qualified. The fees for college work have been 
reduced to conform with other courses. The right is reserved to 
withdraw any course for which there are not three or more appli- 
cants. 



The University Summer School 15 

GRADUATE COURSES. 



With the authority of the Board of Trustees of the University, the 
Summer School began in 1911 to offer some opportunity for ad- 
vanced work to properly qualified college graduates. Candidates 
who have the time to do considerable study in the intervening pe- 
riods can thus secure a Master's degree by faithful work in the 
graduate courses of at least three summer sessions. The study of 
the intervening periods and, if necessary, for a third year, will be 
under the guidance of the professors. But more than three years of 
study is often advisable. In connection with the major course a 
thesis or essay is required for submission to the Faculty of the Uni- 
versity. Candidates for degrees will find the regulations governing 
graduate work fully set forth in the General Catalogue of the Uni- 
versity, and in the special Bulletin of the Graduate School. The 
courses offered for the summer of 1918 are listed under the several 
subjects classified. 

The right is reserved to withdraw any course for which there are 
not two or more applicants. In some cases a course may be given for 
only one applicant if the fee for the following summer session be 
paid in advance, or if the course is requested in the last summer of 
the student's candidacy. 

Students who wish to register for graduate work will confer with 
Dr. W. H. Bocock, Dean of the Graduate School. 

SMITH-HUGHES VOCATIONAL. COURSES. 

Among the important advances being made in the educational 
work of Georgia is that of vocational education under the provision 
of the Smith-Hughes bill. Complying with the requirements of this 
bill Georgia has begun in earnest this work under the direction of 
the State Vocational Board. For the supervision of Agricultural 
Vocational Schools, Professor Robert D. Maltby has been chosen and 
has already entered into the work. Professors of Vocational Edu- 
cational, Mr. John T. Wheeler at the State College of Agriculture, 
and Mr. E. Page Tracy at the Georgia School of Technology, have be- 
gun Instruction. Other instructors and officers are being planned. 
The great need at the present time is for teachers who can qualify 
with the vocational board to do Smith-Hughes vocational teaching. 
To meet this demand as much instruction as possible will be given 
during the 1918 University Summer School for Teachers. The 
courses given will be planned to meet two needs: Courses counting 
toward regular college credit to prepare men for vocational teach- 
ers, and courses planned to meet the needs of teachers already in the 
field. Those who wish information concerning the special require- 



16 The University Summer School 

merits of the board may write to Professor Joseph S. Stewart, or 
Professor Robert D. Maltby at Athens. 

PREPARATORY COLLEGE COURSES. 

While no preparatory college courses are listed in the regular 
Summer School program, arrangements for suitable instruction 
may be made by those wishing to prepare for entrance to college. 
There will be available tutors and graduate students who will be 
glad to undertake such instruction based on private arrangements. 
All courtesies of the Summer School will be extended such students 
as may apply for this work. 

LOCATION OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SCHOOL. 

The city of Athens has many advantages as a seat of the Univer- 
sity Summer School for Teachers. The home of the State Univer- 
sity, the State College of Agriculture, the State Normal School, Lucy 
Cobb Institute and a fine High School system, it affords a fitting cen- 
ter for Georgia teachers. Growing up around the University system, 
the city now has a population of twenty thousand and an enviable 
health record for many years. The city is situated among the 
rolling hills of Northeast Georgia, between two upper branches of 
the Oconee River, has an elevation of nearly 800 feet, is free from 
malarial conditions, and has pure water and excellent climate. 
There are in the city many attractive features of interest to the 
visitor. 

PLANT AND FACILITIES. 

The entire University plant will be available, including the library, 
laboratories, lecture halls, dormitories, gymnasium and swimming 
pool of the central University; the Agricultural College with its 
equipment of class rooms, library, laboratories, dairies, greenhouses, 
and farm of 1,000 acres; the State Normal School with its dormito- 
ries, class rooms, library, assembly room, play grounds, and charm- 
ing environment of campus and farm. This unusual combination of 
three institutions gives the Georgia Summer School a delightful and 
unexcelled environment and facilities for study and recreation. 

THE STATE NORMAL SCHOOL. 

The State Normal School is located on the western side of the 
city on a high elevation where one may enjoy the most invigorating 
of atmospheres at all seasons. It has three academic buildings, four 
dormitories, a dining hall, a practice school building, a Carnegie 
library, a gymnasium, and infirmary, and the new handsome Jere 
M. Pound auditorium, and class room building. The distance from 



Tht University Summer School 



17 




The Xew Jere M. Pound Auditorium at the State Normal School. 




The New Miller Dormitory, at the state Normal School. 



18 The University Summer School 

the central University may be traversed in 30 minutes walk, 
and the street cars pass directly from one to the other. The 
Summer School has grown so large that more and more of its activ- 
ities must be shared by the central University, the State Normal 
School, and the College of Agriculture jointly. The courses for 
teachers of the Primary grades (1-4) are planned to be given en- 
tirely in the rooms of the State Normal School where the library and 
other equipment are best for such work. It will be most convenient 
for such teachers to take rooms in the Normal School dormitories. 
This plan proved most successful last year and resulted in a fine 
spirit of efficiency. 

THE STATE COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE. 

The College of Agriculture is located on the southern side of the 
city at a distance of 15 minutes walk from the central University. 
Its principal building is on a hill commanding a charming view. 
It is a thoroughly equipped modern plant, and it offers through the 
coming Summer School a full complement of courses such that a 
student may secure full work in Agriculture throughout the session. 
Attention is called to these courses as outlined further on in this 
Bulletin. Teachers are urged to consider agriculture as an attrac- 
tive field for special preparation. There is a growing demand for 
teachers of agriculture, and this will soon be increased by the 
passage of appropriation laws by the U. S. Congress such as are 
embodied in the Smith-Hughes bill just passed. Efficient teachers 
can secure excellent positions at large salaries in this new field. 
Teachers are urged to equip for it, and school officials are advised 
to encourage local teachers to prepare for the opportunities of the 
near future. These government appropriations will go where com- 
munities are prepared to do the best work. The College of Agri- 
culture offers an unequalled opportunity in these Summer School 
courses. The teacher of the one-teacher rural school may learn how 
to teach agriculture through boys' and girls' clubs. The teachers in 
a consolidated school may find many-sided courses covering fully 
the work in agriculture for such a school. And the teachers in a 
city school may find the nature study, gardening, floriculture and 
other phases suited to their needs. 

LIBRARIES. 

The University library will be open every day and evening for 
reading and consulting of books and periodicals. The library con- 
tains over 40,000 volumes. The Normal School library will be open 
every day except Sunday and the Agricultural College library will 
be available when needed. 



The University Summer School 19 

HEALTH. 

The Summer School students have enjoyed an enviable health 
record for the past summers. The Crawford W. Long Infirmary of 
the University and the new infirmary of the Normal School will 
be open and will be under the direction of a physician and an 
able corps of trained nurses. A small registration fee of fifty 
cents is charged for the use of the infirmary, usual medical treat- 
ment and the services of a trained nurse. These features will add 
much to the general comfort and health of students. 

DORMITORIES. 

The effort has been made this year to increase the dormitory facil- 
ities to accommodate as many as may come and to add to their 
pleasure and comfort. 

At the State Normal School. At the State Normal School five 
dormitories are available and will furnish superior accommodation 
for several hundred teachers. These are Bradwell, Gilmer, Senior, 
Winnie Davis and Miller Halls. The new Miller Hall is one of the 
best equipped dormitories in the South, providing hot and cold 
water for each room and other comforts to increase everyday satis- 
factions. This dormitory has been completed since last Summer 
School and will afford added comforts to those already provided on 
the State Normal School campus. The Normal School dormitories 
are grouped conveniently together and form a delightful community, 
convenient to games, entertainments, open air concerts and all priv- 
ileges of the campus. 

At the University. At the University, Old College, New College, 
Candler Hall, Lumpkin Hall, Lucas Hall, and the homes conducted 
under the auspices of the Georgia College Woman's Club, will be 
available. Of these all but Lumpkin and Lucas Hall are reserved 
for women. The City Y. M. C. A. building, one of the best 
equipped of any city, will be available for men and for a reasonable 
fee they may enjoy the showers and swimming pool as well as re- 
creation features. The Chi Phi Chapter House, under the direct 
supervision of a mature matron, will be opened as a home for col- 
lege women under the auspices of the Georgia College Woman's 
Club. Rooms will be assigned primarily to members of this club 
or graduates of colleges attending the Summer School. Special 
features of study and companionship will be planned. 

DINING HALLS. 

Dining halls at both the University and Normal School are con- 
ducted under most favorable circumstances, having the advantage of 
the regular managements. In connection with each a farm and 
dairy will furnish practical assistance in supplying plenty of whole- 



20 The University Summer School 

some food at reasonable cost and under the plans of patriotic 
menus. Senior Hall, at the State Normal School, and Denmark Hall, 
at the University,, will extend themselves this year to offer substan- 
tial services to the teachers who come to Athens. The price of 
board quoted is for the entire term, beginning Monday, July 1, and 
extending through Saturday, August 3. However, the dining halls 
will open Saturday, June 29, at supper to accommodate those who 
wish to come early, and for this service only a nominal fee of 
twenty-five cents a meal will be charged. 

APPLICATION FOR ROOMS. 

Application for rooms should be made at the earliest moment 
possible. At the University the application should be accompanied 
by the fee for room, and should be sent to Mr. T. W. Reed, Registrar 
of the University, Athens, Georgia. Rooms will be reserved in the 
order of applications. Fees will always be returned and room re- 
leased for good reason. Application for rooms at the State Normal 
School should also be made as early as possible but no fee is re- 
quired at the time of reservation. Application should be made to 
Mr. A. Rhodes, Registrar of the State Normal School, Athens, Geor- 
gia. Students occupying rooms in any of the dormitories should 
bring with them at least the following articles: One pillow, two pairs 
of pillow cases, two pairs of sheets, two counterpanes, a half dozen 
towels. 

SELECTION OF DORMITORY. 

It is important that those making application for reservation of 
rooms keep in mind the fact that courses for primary work will be 
given at the State Normal School grounds and all teachers who reg- 
ister for these primarily should take rooms there. Physical train- 
ing and all necessary courses will be offered on the grounds so that 
it will not be necessary to go to the University campus for recita- 
tion. Evening entertainments, twilight games, open air band con- 
certs will be divided between the two campuses and special meet- 
ings where the entire student body will come -together will be held 
at both the University and Normal School. This provides a most 
pleasing variation and community of fellowship. 

Rooms in private homes, convenient to the dining halls, may be 
had at reasonable rates. 

FEES AND OTHER EXPENSES. 

The effort is made to make all expenses for the stay in Athens as 
small as possible, consistent with the teachers' desired standards. 

Room rent for the entire Teachers' Summer School session will 
be $4.00. 



The University Summer School - 21 

Meals in the dining halls for the entire session of five weeks will 
cost $26.00; for one week, $6.00; and $1.00 a day for part week. 

The general registration fee for all teachers' courses is only 
$5.00, admitting the student to as many courses as may be taken. 

The fee far college credit work has been reduced to $15.00 lor 
full eight weeks', and $7.50 for five weeks' credit courses. This fee 
admits to as many courses as are allowed by credit committee. 

The fee for graduate courses is $15.00. 

An infirmary fee of fifty cents will be charged. 

Small laboratory fees will be charged in the courses in household 
arts, agriculture, arts and crafts, to cover cost of materials. 

Other expenses will vary with the number of text-books desired, 
the number of incidentals and plans of the student. The total neces- 
sary expenses while in Athens may be limited to from $40.00 to 
$60.00 for the Teachers' Summer Session. 

GEORGIA CO-OPERATIVE ASSOCIATION. 

A cooperative store for the University is in successful operation, 
selling books, note-books, pencils, pens, fountain-pens, ink, paper, 
blue-books, athletic goods, pennants, college jewelry, and sundry 
supplies for students. The organization has no capital stock but is 
managed by a Board of Directors from the Faculty of the University. 
It is operated for the benefit and convenience of the students. The 
prices to members charged by the "Coop" (as it is popularly called) 
are considerably less than those usually charged. However, non- 
members pay the regular prices. 

In connection with the "Coop" is a University post-office in which 
there are about 700 call-boxes. The U. S. postal officials deliver mail 
here three or four times a day and this is distributed to the indi- 
vidual boxes. 

The Directors have decided to allow Summer School students to 
become members of the Association for the period of the summer 
term on payment of a fee of 25 cents. This will give each mem- 
ber the benefit of the reduced prices and will also permit the use 
of a box in the University post-office. Those who desire to take 
advantage of this may leave directions with their home post-office 
to have their mail forwarded to Athens in care of the Georgia Co- 
operative Association. 

STATE EXAMINATIONS. 

The annual state examinations for Primary, General Elementary. 
High School, and Renewal licenses will be held at the Summer 
School August 2 and 3, under authority of the State Board. Li- 
censes will be issued to those passing the several examinations. 
Every opportunity will be given Cor study and preparation for these 



22 The University Summer School 

examinations. The State Board recommends that every teacher 
should attend a summer school at least one year during the life of 
the license. 

The following suggestions will be helpful to those who wish to 
take the state examinations: 

For Primary License to Teach. The state examination will be 
based on the following subjects: Reading, Writing, Spelling, Arith- 
metic (to percentage), Language Lessons and Composition, Elemen- 
tary Geography and the Manual of Methods. The examination will 
be held August 2, at the Summer School. 

For Renewal of License. The 1918 State Reading Course for 
renewals is made up of the following books: The Georgia Manual; 
Teaching in Rural Schools, Woofter; School Efficiency, Bennett; 
or, licenses may he renewed hy taking standard teacher courses ap- 
proved hy the Superintendent, without standing the renewal exami- 
nations. 

For Elementary License to Teach. The state examination will be 
based upon the following subjects in addition to those of the Pri- 
mary license mentioned above: Arithmetic, Grammar, U. S. History, 
Civics, Geography, Physiology, Agriculture. Sufficient treatment of 
the primary subjects will be given in connection with the more ad- 
vanced work of this department to enable teachers to cover both 
examinations. The examinations will be held August 2 and 3, 
in the Summer School. 

For License Renewal. The courses are the. same as those for 
Primary Renewals. 

For High School License. The law may require satisfactory exam- 
ination upon the books of the Reading Course and upon any three of 
the following high school groups: (1) Mathematics, (2) English, 
(3) Science, (4) Languages, (5) History. 

The books of the 1918 Reading Course are "The Manual;" and 
"Class Management," Hollister; and "How to Teach," by Strayer 
and Norsworthy. 

For License Renewal. Renewal examinations are based upon the 
three books of the Reading Course above given. Requirements in 
selected courses may be offered on the approval of the superintend- 
ent. 

REGISTRATION. 

Students should present themselves for registration on Monday, 
July 1, which day will be given over to registration. The regis- 
tration on this day will be in George Peabody Hall at the University 
and James M. Smith Building at the Normal School. The Superin- 
tendents and members of the faculty will be present for consultation. 



The University Slimmer School 



23 




The "Octagon" Assembly Hall. 




1917 Summer School Physical Training Exercises. 



24 The University Summer School 

Courses should be agreed upon and entered so that classes may be 
attended the next day. 

Students who wish to register for college credit courses will first 
consult Prof. R. S. Pond. Students who wish to register for grad- 
uate courses will first consult Dean W. H. Bocock. 

Students who wish to register for Summer School Diploma courses 
or for special renewal license courses should have their courses ap- 
proved by the Superintendent, who will also be available for general 
consultation. 

Registration for Summer School Diplomas and graduate or college 
credit courses will not be permitted after July 10. 

To be admitted to classes students must present a registration 
card indicating the courses for which they have registered. This 
must be signed by the Registrar. 

Students should, as far as possible, arrange to reach Athens in 
time to start classes Tuesday morning, July 3. The dormitories 
are opened Saturday at noon for the session. 

TEACHERS' BUREAU. 

A Teachers' Bureau is maintained during the Summer School for 
the benefit of teachers desiring a change of position. Many appli- 
cations for teachers are received each year while the Summer School 
is in session, and many Superintendents visit the Summer School 
for the purpose of employing well-qualified teachers. In order that 
the management may keep closely in touch with available teachers 
and be enabled thereby to render prompt service to school officials 
applying for teachers, all well-qualified applicants in attendance are 
invited to register with the Teachers' Bureau in the Superintendent's 
office. There is no registration fee charged. Applicants are expected 
to file testimonials or letters of recommendation. Last year many 
teachers received better positions, with increased salary and the 
fee which might have been paid to a teacher's agency was sufficient 
to cover all expenses at the Summer School. 

RECREATION AND ENTERTAINMENT. 

Recreation is an important part of the best Summer School life. 
While the best teachers are no longer willing to consider a summer 
Chautauqua with much entertainment and little study a substitute 
for genuine Summer School work and recreation, they recognize the 
just merits of making the summer vacation a pleasant as well as 
profitable one. To this end, the University Summer School will 
strive to offer substantial recreation to all those who come. Ath- 
letics and games, swimming and folk-dances, open air band con- 
certs, community recreation, pageants and organized play will con- 
stitute an integral part of the recreation hours. One of the most 



26 The University Summer School 

delightful of pastimes last year was the twilight games and story- 
hours wherein every one could play the games of childhood. On one 
evening as many as 1,000 persons were taking an active part in the 
games. At other times many participated. Lectures and entertain- 
ments of a high order will be offered at appropriate stated intervals. 
The noted Devereux Players will again give their open air plays and 
will please large numbers. Many attractive programs are being 
planned so that the end of the Summer School will find all who 
select their courses well in a fit condition to do their part in the 
momentous work of the next year. 

THE DEMONSTRATION SCHOOL. 

One of the special features of the Summer School will be the 
Demonstration School on the Normal School campus under the di- 
rection of Miss Laura Smith, Supervisor of Elementary Schools of 
the city of Atlanta. Than Miss Smith there is no more efficient 
and successful director in the South and her Manual of Methods for 
the Atlanta schools has gained national recognition. 

RURAL LIFE CONFERENCES. 

A special week of conferences on Rural Life and Education will 
be held during the third week of the Summer School. Each year 
these conferences bring together much of the best talent in the 
state and elsewhere with a view to practical help in the problems of 
the country school, and each year they appear to grow in enthusiasm 
and helpfulness. Superintendent Brittain of Georgia and Superin- 
tendent Joyner of North Carolina will be in attendance. 

CHILD WELFARE EXHIBIT. 

A Child Welfare Exhibit is being arranged and will be shown in 
the Psychological Laboratory rooms, in connection with school ex- 
hibits and other information of interest to teachers. The attempt 
will be made to have this exhibit of distinctive interest to teachers. 
This exhibit will be in charge of Dr. Frances Bradley, of the Natoinal 
Childrens' Bureau at Washington and will be accompanied by her 
lectures and demonstrations. 

RED CROSS WEEK. 

One week is being planned as Red Cross Week. Already Dr. 
Stockton Axson, National Secretary of the American Red Cross, has 
agreed to devote one week to the University of Georgia Summer 
School. He will be remembered as a former Georgian, former pro- 
fessor in Princeton, brother-in-law of President Wilson and one of 
the men of the moment. With him it is hoped such officials of the 
Southeastern Division as may come will attend and help. 



The University Summer School 27 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION, 1918 



The courses of instruction announced for the 1918 Summer School 
follow. Special descriptions and credits offered may be noted in 
connection with each course listed. Credits are of several sorts: 
College credit for University of Georgia degrees; college credit for 
degrees from other institutions; university credit for graduate de- 
grees; credit toward the University Summer School diploma; and 
credit toward renewal of license. Review courses may not count as 
credits but prepare the student for the final credit of* receiving li- 
cense to teach through the official state examinations. In some in- 
stances all review courses combined may. count as one diploma 
credit. A college credit course also carries with it credit toward the 
Summer School diploma, where requirements are fulfilled. 



AGRICULTURE. 

1. Elementary Agriculture. Mr. Fain 

The state textbook will be followed in a general way with such 
references to additional works as may be deemed necessary. Espe- 
cial emphasis will be given to the work to be done by the students 
in the elementary schools. This will include simple experiments 
to be performed at the school, such work as can be done at the 
home of the students, and in the school garden. Excursions will 
be made from time to time to different parts of the College farm, 
and the various laboratories of the Agricultural College will be 
utilized in studying the various laboratory experiments suggested. 
Daily. Home Study: Haligan's "Fundamentals of Agriculture," 
Call and Schafen's "Laboratory Manual of Agriculture." 

la. Elementary Agriculture Review Course. Similar to above 
except on alternate days for economy in time for those who must 
take many subjects in review for the teacher's examination for 
license. 

2. High School Agriculture, General. .Mr. Fain 

Warren's "Elementary Agriculture" will be used as a textbook. 
Especial study will be made of laboratory practice to go with this 
text. The general scheme for this laboratory work will be outlines 
showing how seasonal work can be combined with the text, how the 
home farms and gardens can be used and especial exercises sug- 



28 The University Summer School 

gested to increase the powers of observation in students. , Regular 
excursions over the college farm, dairy, etc., will be required. 

Home Study: "Soils," by Fletcher; "Field Crops," by Wilson & 
Warburton; "Beginnings in Animal Husbandry," by Plumb; "Fruit 
Growing," by S. B. Greer; "Rural School Agriculture," C. W. Davis. 
Read all and pass examination on any two'.. Credit toward diploma. 

3. Landscape Gardening and Floriculture. Mr. McHatton 
This course will be adapted to teachers of high schools and upper 

grammar school grades. It will include a discussion of the funda- 
mental principles of landscape gardening, as well as a study of the 
plants used to obtain the desired effects. The handling, growing, 
propagation of flowers and other ornamental plants will receive 
attention. Special emphasis will be placed upon the question of 
school grounds and home improvement, both in the country and in 
the city. Regular excursions to the various points of landscape and 
floricultural interests in and about the city of Athens will be made. 

The book will be "The Manual of Gardening," by L. H. Bailey. 
Other reference books will be "Landscape Gardening," by Waugh; 
"Landscape Gardening," by. Maynard; "Kemp's Landscape Garden- 
ing," by Waugh; "Principles of Floriculture," by White; and others. 
Home Study will be assigned. (Probably not offered in 1918). 
Credit towards diploma. 

4. Animal Husbandry. Mr. Goodwin 
This course will include a study of the characteristics and adapta- 
tion of the different types of horses, cattle and hogs. Some study 
will also be made of the more important breeds of each class. The 
breeding, feeding and management of live-stock will also be taken 
up in a general way. The laboratory periods will be given over to 
judging and comparative study of live-stock on the College farm, 
the making of butter, separation of milk and testing of milk and its 
products. Home Study will be assigned. Credit towards diploma. 

5. Elementary Soils and Soil Fertility. Mr. Crabb 
This course is designed for those who desire special information 

on soils and soil fertility. The work includes a study of soil forma- 
tion, classification, physical properties and composition of soils. 
Also the study of conditions essential for plant growth, plant food 
elements in the soil and their relation to plant growth. The man- 
agement of different soils for the maintenance of their productivity 
and the use of commercial fertilizers are studied. Class work con- 
sists of lectures, recitations, demonstrations, laboratory experiments 
and field excursions on the Agricultural College farm. Text: "Soils 
and Soil Fertility," by Whitson and Walster; "Field and Laboratory 
Studies of Soils," by McCail. Home Study: Burkett's "Soils." 
Credit towards diploma. 



The University Summer School 29 

6. Elementary Field Crops. Mr. Crabb 

This course is designed to give special information on common 
field crops. A study will be made of their classification, uses, rela- 
tive importance; their growth, and the functions of seed, leaves and 
roots. Attention will be given to the following crops: Grain crops, 
including corn, wheat, oats, rice, sorghum, etc.; forage crops — 
grasses, legumes, alfalfa, etc.; miscellaneous crops — potatoes, sugar 
cane, tobacco, etc.; fibre crops — cotton, etc. A brief study of weeds 
will be made, also of crop rotations. Class work will include lec- 
tures, recitations and laboratory exercises. Text: "Field Crops," 
by Wilson and Warburton; "Field and Laboratory Studies of Crops." 
by McCall. Home Study: Duggar's "Southern Field Crops." Credit 
towards diploma. 

Agronomy 5 and 6. Mr. Crabb 

A study of the origin and physical properties of different soil 
types. Factors is crop production. Methods of soil management 
and studies of commercial fertilizers. Lectures, recitations, labor- 
atory work, field excursions and parallel readings. Three hours cred- 
it. Laboratory fee, $5. 

7. Cotton Grading. Mr. Rast 
A complete course in cotton grading, warehousing, marketing, and 

cotton arithmetic will be offered at the Georgia State College of 
Agriculture this summer. The work of the first week will consist 
of lectures each afternoon. These will be based on the scientific 
aspects of cotton grading, what it will take to constitute a grade, etc. 
Some laboratory work will also be given the first week, but middling 
cotton will be the only grade studied. Since this is the basis of all 
grading it is essential that the student have a thorough knowledge 
of the defects this grade may carry. If middling cotton is learned 
thoroughly all subsequent work in cotton classification will be com- 
paratively easy. 

During the second week the upper grades, or the grades which 
are better than middling will be studied, and handled in the lab- 
oratory in comparison with middling samples. Talks will be given 
from time to time on the best methods of growing and gathering 
cotton to obtain the highest grades. 

The third week will be given to the lower grades with a daily 
review of the upper grades and middling. During this week the 
students will also be required to average lots from a great number of 
bales. Some attention will also be given to the question of buying, 
selling and warehousing. 

During .the fourth week the laboratory will be turned into a cotton 
market where each student will be required to buy and sell a certain 



30 The University Summer School 

number of bales of cotton daily, and to get or give the correct price 
for same. He will be credited on his accuracy in this line of work. 
This practice has proven not only interesting in the extreme but the 
most instructive of any (methods we have ever tried. 
Students will have a great many samples to handle daily, and 
thereby become thoroughly familiar with the appearance and nature 
of the various grades. The whole course is one of work, and the 
student who is not willing to work need hardly expect to complete 
the course. For each student who completes the course, there has 
been provided by the Board of Trustees a certificate of efficiency 
signed by the President of the College and the instructors in the 
course. 

Cotton Industry 9. Mr. Rast 

Summer Cotton Grading School includes a thorough study of the 
different grades and types of cotton bought and sold in Georgia as 
compared with the official grades prepared by the U. S. Bureau of 
Standards. Hundreds of different samples are handled and studied 
each afternoon for five consecutive weeks. 

Modern warehouse construction, cotton insurance, buying and 
selling on both spot and future markets with the necessary book- 
keeping connected is given sufficient consideration to enable the 
student with little additional experience to take charge of a ware- 
house and buy and sell cotton in open market. 

Each student who satisfactorily completes the course will be given 
a certificate of efficiency. When proper entrance requirements are 
met, students will be given one and one-half hours college credit. 

This course may be taken separately or in connection with Cotton 
Industry 10. 

Cotton Industry 10. Mr. Rast 

One conference each day reporting reviews of cotton breeding lit- 
erature and details of experimental work in progress with cotton. 
One two-hour laboratory period each day, making cotton hybrids 
and studying Fl, F2 and F3 hybrids previously made is also re- 
quired. A study of oil content in seed from different varieties and 
strains will be made with a view of increasing this constituent by 
selection. 

This course is especially designed for students who specialize in 
Cotton Industry. Courses 4 and 5 are prerequisite, and it should 
be taken in connection with Cotton Industry 9. The two taken to- 
gether constitute three hours college credit. 

8. School and Home Gardening. Mr! Sell 

There is a great demand at this time for teachers who are able 

to conduct garden work at the school and supervise the home gar- 
den. Such gardens are an essential in eyery school system. 



The University Summer School 31 

The course in School and Home Gardening will include practical 
work in laying off plots, preparing the soil, planting seeds and meth- 
ods of cultivation in the garden. The evolution of the school garden 
will be studied and suggestions will be made to aid the teacher in 
planning the garden work so that the home gardens especially may 
be a success. This course will be given to be of actual assistance 
to teachers. Credit toward diploma. 

Animal Husbandry, 2, 3, 4, and 5. Mr. Goodwin 

The origin, history and development of the present type of horses, 
mules, beef cattle, dairy cattle, sheep and swine are taken up. Four 
hours credit. Laboratory fee, $5.00. 

Horticulture, 1, 2, and 3. Mr. Stuckey 

Fruit growing, pruning, propagation, and truck gardening are 
included in this course. _ Three hours credit. Laboratory fee, $5.00. 

Veterinary Medicine. 1 and 2. Mr. Burson 

This course includes anatomy and physiology of farm animals 
and some work in materia medica. Three hours credit. Laboratory 
fee, $5.00. 

Agricultural Chemistry 2b. Mr. Worsham 

Qualitative and quantitative analyses for agricultural students. 
Qualitative analyses equal to that given in college catalogue under 
la will be required. Laboratory fee, $5.00 for each course. Three 
hours credit each. 

Poultry Husbandry, Poultry 7. Mr. Wood 

A general course in poultry management, covering breeds and 
breeding, housing, feeding, incubation, brooding and marketing. 
Breeds best suited to Georgia and their requirements will be studied 
in detail. Poultry problems in this state will be discussed. Labora- 
tory work consists of practical work among the flocks on the College 
poultry farm. Five lectures and three laboratories per week. 

9. Agricultural Club Work. 

This course will present the most effective way of teaching ele- 
mentary agriculture in rural schools, especially in those of new 
teachers. This most effective way is through boys' and girls' clubs. 
A study of this work will be presented under the following sub- 
courses following consecutively so as to make one complete course 
running throughout the session, one hour each day, with laboratory 
practice as possible. 

(1) Corn, Pig, and Four-Crop Cluhs. The work will cover the 
history of club work, purposes of same, methods of organization 
and instruction, rules, relation to school work, home life, and re- 
sults attained. Practice work will be given. 



32 The University Summer School 

(2) Canning Club and Home Demonstration Work. Two weeks 
in all will be devoted to the two divisions of the work. Daily illus- 
trated lectures will be given and a demonstration period each after- 
noon provided to include practical work in canning, preserving and 
making labor-saving devices. Miss Dowdle and Miss Skinner. 

a. Canning Clubs. From the standpoint of the rural school and 
its relation to club work, the following subjects will be presented: 
Organization of Canning Clubs, agricultural instruction, record keep- 
ing, sewing, canning and preserving, marketing, exhibits, and social 
development. 

b. Home Demonstration Work. Following the development of 
clubs for girls, the organization of the women of a community for 
demonstrations in their homes will be presented. The place of 
cooking, making labor-saving and sanitary devices, dairy and poultry 
work will be considered and the making of such labor-saving devices 
as fireless cooker, iceless refrigerators, etc., will be demonstrated. 

(3) Poultry Clubs. Lectures will cover the general subject of 
Poultry Husbandry such as a brief study of the common varieties 
of chickens, natural and artificial incubation and brooding prin- 
ciples and methods of feeding, housing, and poultry club work. 
Such laboratory periods as can be scheduled will be held at the 
poultry farm in the afternoons. These laboratory periods will cover 
one hour each day. Professor Allen. 

10. Nature Study. Miss Bacon 

This course is planned to help the grade teacher over the hard 
places in developing this work. It aims to give the teacher power 
and resourcefulness in organizing the abundant subject matter to 
be found in every environment into an effective course for the 
pupils. Its chief object is to stimulate wholesome activities in the 
child, in order that these may lead to life-long, vital interests. 
Teachers should bring their copies of Hodge's Nature Study and Life. 

Agricultural Engineering. ■ Mr. Hart, Mr. Welch 

lb. Forge Shop. This course is especially designed for students 
taking the Agricultural Education degree, and leads to the taking up 
of project work in the junior and senior years. One hour's credit, 
freshman. 

2b. Work Shop. This course deals with the sharpening and 
maintenance of woodworking tools and machinery, and leads to the 
manufacture of all household conveniences, also the erection of 
all small and large buildings on the farm. One hour's credit, fresh- 
man. 

3b. Drawing. Both freehand and instrumental work will be given,, 
and are supplemental to the advanced course in farm building. One 
hour's credit, freshman. 



The University Summer School 33 

4b. Farm Machinery and Farm Motors. Farm machinery and 
farm motors will be thoroughly studied, and all of the latest im- 
proved machinery will be available for student instruction. Special 
attention will be given to farm motors, both stationary and tractors, 
and special emphasis will be laid on the power equipment on the 
farm. Three hours credit, sophomore. 

5b. Surveying. All elements in surveying will be given in ter- 
racing, ditching and draining. One hour's credit, junior. 

6b. Farm Buildings and Sanitation. This course will consist of a 
careful study of the designs of all farm buildings, ventilation, water 
supply, drainage and sanitation. Three hours credit, junior. 

7b. Concrete Work. This course deals with the up-to-date appli- 
cation of concrete to all farm problems, such as the making of 
fence posts and the application of concrete in the making of the 
farm sanitary. One hour's credit, senior. 

Agricultural Education. Mr. Wheeler 

(See Education). 

EDUCATION. 

1. History of Education. Mr. Wood 
A study of the development of ideals, conceptions, organization, 

and methods of teaching. The work will begin with the transition 
to modern times and will place emphasis upon the modern periods. 
The doctrines of Rousseau, Pestalozzi, Froebel, Herbart, Spencer, 
Mann, Page, Dewey and other moderns, will be interpreted in a 
practical way to make this course helpful to .teachers of any grade. 
Text: Graves, Students' History of Education. Home Study: Por- 
tions of the same book, and others assigned. Credit toward diploma. 

2. The Georgia Manual and Bennett's 

"School Efficiency. " Mr. Earnest 

These books provided by law for primary and elementary licenses 
will be covered by outline, lecture, and quiz. Teachers will be pre- 
pared for the examinations, but the chief aim will be to improve 
methods in teaching and management. SeveraJ sections. 

3. School Management, Primary-Elemkntary. Mr. Ritchie 
. Elements of governing power as embodied in the teacher. Con- 
ditions of easy control — routine and habit. Mechanical devices in 
regard to seating, signals, passing. A discussion of the principles 
of regularity and punctuality. A study of school hygiene from the 
standpoint of detection and prevention of physical defects, correct 
posture, care of the body, exercise, play games. Due consideration 
will he given the topics of Order, Discipline, and Penalties through 
a discussion of Instincts, Capacity, Interest, and Attention. A study 
of the child from the standpoint of response to reason; of response 




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The University Summer School 35 

to feeling. A discussion of examinations, grading and reports with 
reference to school government. Credit toward diploma. 

Text: Bagley's Classroom Management. Home Study: Dresslar, 
School Hygiene; Ruediger, The Principles of Education. 

4. Primary Reading, (Grades 1-4). Mrs. Alexander 

Mrs. Sinclair, Miss Collier 
State adopted readers, both required and supplementary, will be 
presented in this course. Teachers should bring some of these 
books with them. The teacher will thus become familiar with 
reading texts in use in the state. The examination and study of 
such a series will give a sufficient background for daily use, in any 
grade, and will enable the Primary teacher to teach the beginnings 
of the subject in the light of a knowledge of the whole. 

Various methods of teaching will be presented and discussed, 
model lessons will be given; an exhaustive study of texts will be 
required. 

In connection with the methods presented, a short course in 
story telling will be given. This will include a list of suitable 
stories for Primary grades; stories best adapted to the age and 
conditions of pupils; stories that are universal favorites; methods 
of presenting stories; model stories. 

The dramatization of stories will also be included in the course. 
List of plays suitable for grade presentation; and suggestions as to 
staging, coaching, and costuming will be given. Credit towards di- 
ploma. 

Home Study: Reading in Public Schools, Briggs and Coffman. 

Phonics. The course in Phonics is designed to train teachers in 
actual sounding of the elements of speech; to train their ears to 
discern correct and incorrect sounds; to enable them to teach dia- 
critical marking and sounding in grade work. 

The work will include drills on the sounding of all consonants and 
vowels; the marking of words; the sounding of those words; method 
in presenting the subject of phonics; stories for teaching silent 
letters, vowel sounds, consonant sounds; devices for securing and 
holding attention in such work. 

Spelling. The course in Spelling consists of: Methods to be used 
in teaching spelling; diacritcal marking of words; sounding words; 
proper pronunciation; drills in articulation and enumeration; oral 
drills in spelling; written spelling from dictation. 

5. Elementary Reading and Literature, (Grades 5-7). 

Mrs. Alexander, Mrs. Sinclair, Miss Collier 

This course will deal briefly with various types of literature and 

interesting methods of presentation will be discussed. Reading 



36 • The University Summer School 

matter that will meet the needs and interests of grammar school 
children will be taken up, read, and analyzed. 

Exercises in thought getting and thought giving will be practiced. 

Teachers of Reading must realize that the teacher cannot be 
ignorant and must not be indifferent in the teaching of reading at 
this critical period of the child's life. 

The classifying of various poems and stories suitable for chil- 
dren will receive a great deal of attention. 

Memory gems will be given each day in order that the teacher may 
get a good collection, and can learn to appreciate them herself be- 
fore attempting to. make the children love them. 

Stories will be told — methods of story telling discussed. Stories 
will be dramatized and suggestions for dramatization work given. 

Phonics and phonetic drills and stories will receive a large part 
of the time in this course. Credit toward diploma. 

6. The Course of Study, (Grades 1-4; Principles of 

Teaching). Miss Smith 

A study of the curriculum for Primary grades; subjects included 
in this modern curriculum; principles underlying the selection of 
subject matter for these grades; the correlation of subjects. A 
brief survey of modern methods of teaching. Discussion of such 
problems as the daily program, group-work, desk-work, etc. Obser- 
vation of work in the Demonstration School and class discussions 
of the work observed. 

Texts: Gessel, The Normal Child and Primary Education; and 
Gilbert's, What Children Study and Why. Special discussions of the 
state adopted texts. Credit toward diploma. 

7. Primary Methods, (Grades 1-4). Miss Smith 
An intensive study of language, composition, spelling, history, 

and number from two standpoints — first, the subject matter; second, 
the method of presentation. 

Texts: The. Primary Course of Study, Atlanta Schools; also any 
two of the following: Suzzallo, The Teaching of Spelling; Smith, 
The Teaching of Arithmetic; Cooley, Language Teaching in the 
Grades; Jenkins, The Teaching o>f Reading. Special discussions of 
the state adopted texts. Credit toward diploma. 

8. The Demonstration School. Miss Smith 
Under the supervision of Miss Laura Smith, this school will serve 

as a sort of educational laboratory in which methods of teaching are 
to be tested, and the principles of modern education applied in 
solving the everyday problems of the schoolroom. 

Observation and a limited amount of practice teaching under 
supervision will be arranged for students registered in this depart- 



The University Summer School 37 

ment of the Summer School. One to two periods each week will be 
given to analyzing lessons observed in the Demonstration School and 
to the making of lesson plans. 

Some of the problems to be worked out in connection with the 
Demonstration School are: 

a. The correlation of subject matter. 

b. Group teaching and the management of desk-w T ork. 

c. Teaching children how to study. 

d. Uses to be made of the "play instinct" in the schoolroom, etc. 
The following arrangement will be followed with reference to 

grouping the children: 

9:00 to 10:00 — first grade. 
10:00 to 10:30 — organized play (first, second, and third grades). 
10:30 to 12:00 — second and third grades. 

9. Rural School Problems. Mr. Martin, Mr. Land 

This course is designed to meet the needs of teachers preparing 
for examination upon the state reading course and for all teachers 
desiring practical first-hand information on our most important 
school problems. Woofter's text will be used throughout the course, 
each week taking up problems of this book. This should be taken 
by every teacher who can schedule it. Credit toward Summer 
School diploma. 

Round Table Conferences. State Supervisors 

Special round table conferences will be planned to supplement 
the lectures on rural school problems and these are open to all 
interested teachers. The purpose of these conferences will be to 
help teachers in the solution of their practical everyday problems 
of teaching and administration. Stated hours daily. 

Conferences on Rural Life and Education. 

Mr. Brittain and County Superintendents 
During the week of July 17, the annual Rural Conferences of 
County Superintendents and Leaders will be held at which the 
Georgia superintendents and workers will cooperate in holding daily 
conferences, morning, afternoon, and night. See announcement 
elsewhere. 

15. Vocational Supervision. Mr. Maltby 

This course will be planned to meet as often as may be desired 
to coordinate it with the courses in vocational education being given 
in the Summer School. It will treat of the general principles of 
school administration as applied to vocational education under the 
conditions prescribed by the Smith-Hughes bill. For supervisors, 
principals and teaehers. 



38 The University Summer School 

16. Agricultural Education. Mr. Wheeler 

This course deals with the theory and rise of vocational education 
as applied to agriculture; the educational and sociological aims and 
values of agricultural instruction; the history and development of 
agricultural education in the United States; the relation of agricul- 
tural education to other forms of education;, the organization of the 
secondary course of study to meet the vocational demands. Voca- 
tional credit. 

20. Methods and Materials in Agricultural Education. 

Mr. Wheeler 
This is essentially a laboratory course in agricultural methods. 
The aim is to organize and present agricultural materials in a log- 
ical, interesting, and effective manner for secondary instruction. 
This course consists of laboratory and field work with materials and 
apparatus; outlining secondary agricultural courses for specific 
communities in Georgia, planning projects for these communities, 
and collecting materials for secondary school work. Vocational 
credit. 

10. High School Administration. Mr. Stewart 
A study of the organization of the modern high school, problems 

pertaining to the administration of the same. A discussion of the 
several units offered in the high school and the teaching of the same. 
High school architecture and equipment. This course is designed 
for teachers in the high schools of Georgia. One and one-half hours 
credit. 

Class Study: Hollister's High School and Class Management. 
Home Study: Monroe's Principles of Secondary Education., 

11. School Supervision. Mr. Stewart 
This course is designed for superintendents of local systems, prin- 
cipals of high schools, and teachers in charge of smaller schools. 
Some time will also be given to supervision of county systems. The 
course will be adapted to the needs of those attending and will con- 
sist of lectures, laboratory exercises, conferences, and required read- 
ings. Principals will be aided in preparing their respective courses 
of study, regulations, and organizations. An attempt will be made 
to make those attending familiar with the best modern thought on 
the supervision and administration of a school or schools. It will 
be especially helpful to recent graduates and principals of high 
schools who have also the supervision of the lower grades. The 
many volumes and reports bearing on this subject in the University 
library will be at the service of the class. 

Cubberley's new book, "Public School Administration," will be 
used throughout the course giving unity to the plan of study, at the 



The University Summer School 39 

same time rich and varied experiences will be portrayed from prac- 
tical contact. Credit toward diploma. 

12. Educational Psychology. Mr. Heatwole 

This course is a study of mental processes in order to determine 
the correct principles of education and teaching. The following 
topics will be treated: The nature and meaning of consciousness 
and its relation to human conduct. The distinguishing character- 
istics of mind, soul and body, and their interdependence. The 
main facts of the structure of the nervous system. The mental 
factors that make up the learning process such as instinctive ten- 
dencies, attention, interest, habit, memory, imagination, thinking, 
and feeling. The significance of the long period of infancy, individ- 
ual differences and the characteristics of the adolescent life. All 
these topics will be treated in the light of their implications for 
educational procedure and the economy of learning. 

Text: "Human Behavior," Bagley and Colvin. 

13. Child Study. Mr. Heatwole 
The physical and mental development of the child. Problems 

peculiar to child-life. The physical basis of mental life as it affects 
the child. Detection and treatment of physical and mental defects. 
Educational importance of the early years of life. 

Text: A. E. Tanner, "The Child." Home Study: Kirkpatrick. 
"The Fundamentals of Child Study." Credit toward diploma. 

14. Advanced Methods. Mr. Wood 
A special course for teachers, based on Strayer and Norsworthy's 

"How to Teach," will be offered. This course will have as its pur- 
pose the grounding of teachers in sound principles and may also be 
used to review the text for renewal of license. Credit one hour and 
a half. 

17. The Sociological Basis of Education — A Graduate 

Course. Mr. Heatwole 

This course seeks to determine some fundamental concepts of 
education in terms of sociology. The following topics will indicate 
the line of study: Various conceptions of sociology; relation of 
sociology to other sciences; origins of society; theory of social 
forces; forms and agencies of social control; the individual and so- 
ciety; modes of experience and individual development; education aa 
a social function; factors in total education; education as growth; 
democratic conception of education; the social nature of knowing; 
education and social progress; the state and education; the social 
nature of the curriculum; comparative values of subjects; growing 
as the ultimate good. 



40 The University Summer School 

Prerequisites: 1. A course in elementary psychology. 2. A 
course in the principles of sociology. 

Readings: Social Principles of Education, Betts; Democracy and 
Education, Dewey; Social Organization, Cooley; Introduction to 
Educational Sociology, Smith; Sociology in its Psychological As- 
pects, Ellwood; Principles of Education, Ruediger; What is Educa- 
tion?, Moore; Social Control, Ross; Principles of Sociology, Giddings. 

This course is one of a series of three, given in consecutive sum- 
mers, constituting a major. Two of them constitute a minor course. 

18. Principles of Rural Life and Education — A Graduate 

Course. Mr. Odum 

(a) The Principles of Rural Sociology. A study of rural life and 
society: Bailey, Carver, Gillette, Foght, and others, with local 
studies. 

(b) Fundamentals of Rural Progress. A constructive program 
of rural progress. An original outline and program will be fol- 
lowed and developed. 

(c) Practical problems. An important problem of rural life or 
the rural school will be selected for research and application of prin- 
ciples and theories studied. 

Prerequisite: Education 5-6. 

The adjustment of this minor course, heretofore given only in the 
regular session, to the work of one or more summer sessions will be 
begun in the summer of 1918. Open to qualified Seniors. 

ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE. 

1. Language Lessons, Elementary. Mr. Brown 
This section is intended for teachers of the third, fourth, and fifth 

grades. It is a class in method of teaching language to beginners. 
The text used by these grades in the schools of Georgia will serve 
as a guide in the selection of material and in the assigning of les- 
sons. Leiper's "Language Work in Elementary Schools" will be 
used as the text in method. Model lessons will be worked out in 
the class, demonstrating the best ways to use the text, what supple- 
mentary material to use and how to present it, and the best ways 
of arousing and holding the interest of the pupils. The scope of 
the course embraces the subjects of oral and written composition, 
spelling, dictation, and memorizing literature. Credit toward di- 
ploma. 

Textbooks: "The Modern Course in English, Book I," Sanford. 
Brown and Smith; and "Language Work in Elementary Schools," 
Leiper. Home Reading: "The Teaching of English," Leiper. 

2. Composition and Grammar. Mr. Brown 
This course is planned for the (teachers of the sixth and seventh 



The University Summer School -il 

grades and such eighth grades as teach elementary English. The 
work given will be partly on subject matter and partly on method. 
The adopted text in English for the sixth and seventh grades will 
furnish a basis for the discussions on alternate days, and Klapper's 
"The Teaching of English" the other days of the week. Formal 
composition, the correction of papers, the values of formal grammar, 
the nomenclature, and various devices for making composition and 
grammar interesting to pupils will be discussed. Lessons will also 
be given on the more difficult parts of grammar, especially the verb 
and the analysis of the sentence. Textbook: "The Modern Course 
in English, Book II." Home Reading: "The Teaching of English." 
Chubb. Credit toward diploma. 

3. Teachers' License Course. Mr. Brown 
As the name implies this course is intended for those who are 

preparing for the state examination at the end of the term. The 
work will consist of lessons from "The Manual of Methods," Book 
II, of the "Modern Course in English." These lessons will treat 
altogether of the subject matter of technical grammar, especial 
stress being laid upon the difficult points in the new nomenclature 
and classification of words. This section meets three times a week. 
Textbook: Section 3, "The Modern Course in English. Book II." and 
"The Manual of Methods for Georgia Teachers." 

4. Teaching High School Composition. Miss Lyndon 
How to conduct the composition course most efficiently is the 

subject of this course. Problems of aims, assignments, correction, 
development 'of the power of self-criticism, and various subsidiary 
questions in organizing and administering the work will be dis- 
cussed. Students are requested to purchase Paul Klapper's "The 
Teaching of English." Credit toward diploma. 

5. High School Literature. Mr. Sanford 
This course will be based on the College Entrance Requirements 

and similar lists. It will consider the purposes to be kept in view 
in studying literature in high school, the best way to plan and pre- 
sent for class^study various kinds of reading, and some of the recent 
movements in the teaching of literature. It will attempt to answer 
the question, "How can I become a better teacher of literature?" 
Students are requested to purchase Arthur H. R. Fairchild's "The 
Teaching of Poetry in High Schools." One and one-half hours credit. 

13. Shakespeare. Mr. Walker 

Midsummer Night's Dream, Julius Caesar, Macbeth. Hamlet and 
The Merchant«of Venice will be studied. Lectures; written reports. 
Twelve other plays of Shakespeare will be used as collateral reading. 
One and one-half hours credit. College credH course. 



42 The University Summer School 

14. Composition and Rhetoric. Mr. Walker 

A study of fundamental rhetorical principles will be combined 
with considerable practice in writing.. One and one-half hours 
credit. 

6. English Grammar, High and Elementary. Mr. Sanford 
This course is designed primarily for teachers of the eighth and 

ninth grades, or the high school classes. The work of the course 
is based on the grammar recently adopted by . the State Board of 
Education for use in the high schools. The work will consist of an 
extended discussion of the more familiar idiomatic uses of the dif- 
ferent parts of speech, explaining those, when necessary, by refer- 
ence to idioms that were in force in the early stages of our language. 
The difference between what we call "good English" and "bad Eng- 
lish" will be explained. The practical side, not the theoretical side, 
of English grammar will be stressed during the entire course. Daily 
throughout the session. Credit toAvard diploma. 

7. Present Tendencies of American Fiction. Mr. Sanford 
The purpose of this course is to give the student a general knowl- 
edge of American fiction: (a) types, (b) excellence in a limited 
field, (c) wholesome outlook upon life. Special emphasis is given 
in this course to Georgia writers: Lanier, Harris, Harben, etc. This 
is a general culture course for which credit is given on the Summer 
School diploma. Daily. Credit toward diploma. 

8. High School License Review (Grammar and Rhetoric). 

Mr. Sanford 
This course will cover a systematic review of the principles 
of English grammar, and of rhetoric, and will be based upon the 
state adopted texts. The object of this course is to prepare the 
teacher for the high school examination in English grammar and 
rhetoric. 

In addition to the adopted text-book on grammar, the "Georgia 
Manual of Methods" will also be studied. 

High School License Review (American and English Literature) 
course will cover in a general way both English and American liter- 
ature with a view to preparing the teacher to pass the high school 
examination on those two subjects. These courses are planned 
primarily to prepare the teacher for license to teach English in the 
high school. 

9. Shakespeare. , Mr. Steed 
This course will deal primarily with the plays selected by the 

.Committee on College Entrance Requirements for careful study and 



The University Summer School 43 

for required reading. Detailed study will be made of the plays re- 
quired for careful study, and as much time as the course permits 
will be given to the plays for required reading. Students contem- 
plating taking this course may bring with them the following plays: 

Careful Study: Macbeth, Julius Caesar, Hamlet. Credit toward 
diploma. 

Required Reading: As You Like It; Twelfth Night; Henry V.; 
Merchant of Venice; Richard III. Daily. 

10. Lecture Readings. Mr. Steed 
A series of interpretative readings of masterpieces from the 

drama, the short story, the dramatic monologue, intended to supple- 
ment work done in other courses by affording additional illustration 
of the principles of literary structure. No collateral study will be 
required and no textbook will be used. Each reading will be open 
to any teacher who may find time to drop in at the meeting hour of 
the class. Alternate days. Credit toward diploma. 

11. The Novel. Mr. Steed 
This course will undertake a study of the novel as a type of 

literature, following the plan pursued in Perry's "A Study of Prose 
Fiction." After illustrating the several phases of the subject with 
typical short stories (Mathews' "The Short Story"), the class will 
read and analyze several representative novels; and suggestions will 
be made for the study of fiction in the high school. 

The following novels will probably be studied: 

Stevenson's "Prince Otto," Allen's "The Choir Invisible," Hardy's 
"The Return of the Native," George Eliot's "Silas Marner," Norris's 
"The Octopus." Daily. Credit toward diploma. 

Home Study: Perry's "A Study of Prose Fiction." Additional 
representative novels. 

12. The Study op Poetry. Mr. Park 
Lectures on Poetics. The reading and interpreting of standard 

English poems, representing the various types of poetry. Special 
study of the lyric. Credit toward diploma. 

En lish Literature — A Graduate Course. Mr. Park 

The English Drama from the beginning through the reign of Eliz- 
abeth, based on Ward's "English Dramatic Literature;" Brooke's 
Tudor Drama; Bates's English Religious Drama; Manley's Speci- 
mens of Pre-Shakespearean Drama; and plays by Udall, Steven- 
son, Sackville and Norton, Kyd, Lyly, Peele, Greene, Nash, Marlowe, 
Shakespeare, Jonson and others. A study will be made of the de- 
velopment of the English language and of dramatic technique. 

One-third of a major course. (Two such courses, somewhat re- 
duced in extent, constitute a minor). 



44 The University Summer School 

Special Lectures. Mr. Axson 

During his stay at the University Summer School, Dr. Axson will 
give one or more of his noted literary lectures. 

20. Greek Literature Mr. Bocock 

An outline of the History of Greek Literature may be given by 
Professor Bocock. It will include readings from some of the trans- 
lations of classic Greek literature. 

Textbook: Capps, "From Homer to Theocritus." 

LITERARY AND DRAMATIC EXPRESSION. 

• 

Perhaps no field of educational endeavor offers greater opportu- 
nity than that of literary and dramatic expression. Its emphasis 
needs no explanation. Its specific educational values and its general 
culture may be limited only by the quality of the interpretation 
given. Special emphasis, therefore, will be given to all aspects of 
literary and dramatic interpretation in the effort to contribute to 
right ideals and passions of the people; to high standards of dra- 
matic expression and appreciation; to educational and cultural 
ideals; to dramatic education for children; and to the community 
values. The University Summer School takes peculiar pride in pre- 
senting an unusual array of attractions that are both substantially 
entertaining and instructive. These will be of special interest not 
only to teachers but to all others interested in drama, pageantry, 
story-telling, folk-^games and other forms of literary and dramatic 
interpretation. 

1. Elementary Reading. Miss Cobb 
Body — physical training, pantomime. Voice— position, breath- 
ing, tone placing. Interpretation — "Evolution of Expression," Vols. 
I and II; dramatic interpretation reading in the grades. The course 
will include lecture work and practical demonstration of principles 
applied to the body, the voice and the printed page. The work will 
be viewed from two viewpoints, the artistic and the pedagogical. 
The needs of the public school teacher in the teaching of reading 
will be considered. 

2. Advanced Expression. Miss Cobb 
Body — Pantomime, responsive drills, gesture, voice, forming the 

elements of speech, (a study of vowels and consonants in the rela- 
tionship of parts, including practice work in articulation and enun- 
ciation) tone color, tone quality, phrasing, grouping relating to in- 
terpretation. Credit toward diploma. 

Interpretation — "Evolution of Expression," Vols. Ill and IV; dra- 
matic interpretation; platform deportment, a study of varied liter- 
ary forms. 



The University Summer School 45 

Special needs of individuals will be studied and the work adapted 
to special needs of the class. The course will include the work of 
dramatization in the grades and high school. Staging of plays will 
be considered and also dramatic work as related to the problem of 
recreation and playgrounds. 

3. Public Speaking. Miss Cobb 

This course in public speaking is designed to meet the needs of 
the high school and college student in declamation and debate. It 
Is, therefore, also specially suited to the teacher of these subjects or 
t» teachers who want to add this service to their schools. The work 
will also be helpful to experienced platform speakers. 

4. Story Telling. Miss Dorough 
The dramatic instinct in education will be kept in mind. The 

principles of story telling. Dramatization as related to story telling. 
Stories will be told in class by instructor and pupils; story hour on 
the campus at twilight and other hours. 

Children's Story Hour. Miss Dorough 

A special feature will be made of the Athens Childrens' Story 

Hour in which Dr. Turner will tell Uncle Remus stories and Miss 
Dorough various other stories. 

5. Play Hour. Miss Pratz 
On stated evenings each week there will be conducted play hours, 

designed to furnish recreation for the student and to give instruction 
in plays and games suitable for adult and children community life. 
(See also Physical Education). 

6. Pageant. Miss Cobb 
There will be a special pageant at the close of the Summer School. 

The student body will be invited to participate and the preparation 
will begin weeks before its presentation. 

7. Special Instruction on Request. Miss Cobb 
To include platform art, pantomime, voice, interpretation of 

drama, readings. For particulars, see Miss Cobb and Miss DuPree. 

8. The Art of Public Speaking. President Southwick 
This is an inspirational lecture given one evening in July, 

and will be given by the president of the Emerson School of Oratory. 

9. Repertoire of Comedies. The Devereux Players 
An unusual attraction of the Summer School will be the matinee 

and evening performances, July 15 and 16, of "Candida," by Bernard 
Shaw; "The Romancers," by Rostand; and "Doctor by Compulsion," 
by Moliere. 



46 The University Summer School 

FOREIGN LANGUAGES. 

At its last meeting in December, 1917, the Modern Language As- 
sociation of America appointed an executive committee of five to 
emphasize the extension of the teaching of French and Spanish in 
all high and preparatory schools and to aid in planning courses and 
supplying teachers. This committee named in each state an execu- 
tive committee to carry forward the work. The chairman of the 
Georgia committee, Professor J. Lustrat, will have charge of the 
courses in the Summer School. French II by Professor Lustrat, and 
Spanish 2 by Professor Ramirez will be devoted to methods of teach- 
ing French and Spanish. Open to teachers, to meet this special 
demand. 

1. French I. Mr. Lustrat 
Beginners: Drill on pronunciation. Rapid study of the most 

elementary rules of French grammar and syntax. 

Study of verbs, regular and irregular. 

The purpose of this course is not to give to the student a thorough 
knowledge of grammar and syntax, which could not be acquired in 
such a short time, but rather to enable him to continue his study 
by himself. Credit toward Summer School diploma. 

2. French II. Mr. Lustrat 
The work of the second year will consist of: 

1. A thorough study of grammar, syntax and verbs. 

2. Translation from English into French. 

3. Writing of letters and easy essays in French. 

4. Reading of modern textbooks by standard French writers. 

5. Parallel reading. 

Credit toward Summer School diploma. 

6. Spoken War French. Mr. Lustrat 

A special course in Spoken War French will be offered to meet a 
growing demand. It will consist in lectures in French by Mr. Lus- 
trat and special exercises for the course. 

3. French X. Mr. Lustrat 
French X is a course for beginners who are conditioned in French 

and wish to substitute French and German for Greek in college 
credits. The course consists of careful drill in pronunciation, the 
rudiments of grammar and syntax, the study of regular and irregu- 
lar verbs, dictation, easy exercise of translation from English into 
French, conversation and reading of easy prose. Three hours credit. 

4. French la. Mr. Lustrat 
French la is an elementary course offered as one of the Junior 

Language options. In this course the various inflections, forms of 
words, verbs, regular and irregular, and construction of sentences 



The University Summer School 47 

are taught. Practice in conversation French, reading, translation 
and writing of French letters. Three hours credit. 

5. Spanish 1. Mr. Ramirez 

Spanish 1 is a course for beginners and consists of careful drill 
in pronunciation, rudiments of grammar and syntax, study of 
verbs, translations and conversation, with reading of easy prose. 
Credit toward Summer School diploma. 
Spanish 2. Mr. Ramirez 

Spanish 2 may be, either a continuation of Spanish 1 or an ad- 
vanced course in the nature of special pedagogical Spanish or 
special applications of Spanish to particular problems of teaching, 
if students so desire. Credit toward Summer School diploma. 

7. German X or la. Mr. DuBose 

* 

German la is an elementary course offered as one of the Junior 

Language options. It may be combined under certain conditions 

with German X for those conditioned in German. Open to teachers. 
Three hours credit. 

8. High School Greek. Mr. Bocock 
For students who wish to complete the high school course and 

college entrance requirements, and for teachers who wish to review 
the essentials of elementary instruction. The course will include a. 
treatment of important inflexions and the fundamental principles of 
syntax, and selected portions of Xenophon's Anabasis will be read. 
Credit toward Summer School diploma. 

9. First Year Latin. Mr. Hooper 
The course is planned for teachers who wish to review the work 

of the first year. Special attention is given to pronunciation, and 
the points to be stressed during the work of this year. The text 
used is Pearson's "Essentials of Latin," adopted by the Board for 
use in the high schools. Credit toward Summer School diploma. 

10. Caesar. Mr. Turner 
For teachers who wish to review the reading of the second year. 

One book is read during the meetings of the class; those who desire 
full credit will complete the reading of four books as "Home Study." 
Credit toward Summer School diploma. 

11. Latin, (High School License Review). Mr. Hooper 
A course for preparation for the examination but which will in- 
clude discussions of problems and methods of teaching. 

12. Latin — A Graduate Course in Roman Philosophy. 

Mr. Hooper 

The five books of Cicero's de Finibns Boiiorum et Maloruin. and 



48 The University Summer School 

the three books of the de Officiis will be supplemented by a reading 
of selected chapters in the history of philosophy treating of the 
leading schools of Greek thought and their influence on Roman 
ijmiosophy; and by a study of the life of Cicero. Much of the read- 
ing will be done in private, and twelve exercises in translating 
English into Latin will be required. 

A minor course. Prerequisite courses: Latin 1, 2, 3, 4, or equiv- 
alents. 

13. French — A Graduate Course. Mr. Lustrat 

The classroom work consists of the translation of twenty pages 
of English into French, composition, conversation, lectures on rhet- 
oric and grammatical difficulties, and the reading of Balzac's Eugenie 
Grandet and Hugo's Ruy Bias. The private reading is as follows: 
Loti's Pecheur d'lslande, Daudet's Tartarin de Tarascon, Corneille's 
Polyeucte, Moliere's Le Tartuffe, Racine's Andromaque, Coppee's 
Pour la Couronne, Zola's La Debacle, Voltaire's "Prose" (a book of 
selections), Rostand's La Princesse Lointaine. Reports on this 
reading will be made~in French. A minor course. Prerequisite: 
French 2 or 2a. 

HISTORY AND SOCIAL SCIENCES. 

1. Modern European History. Mr. Jack 
This course will take up the thread of European History at the 

French Revolution and trace the rise of the present political arrange- 
ments in the leading countries. Especial emphasis will be laid on 
the recent development of the German Empire, and the causes of 
the War of 1914. Holt's "Modern Europe" will be used as a text. 
The course is primarily for high school teachers, though it is also 
open to college students. One and one-half hours credit. 

2. Georgia History. Mr. Brooks 
A lecture course based on Brooks's "History of Georgia." The 

text has recently been rewritten with the view of better adapting it 
to use in the grades. This course is primarily for grade teachers, 
but it is open to college students. One hour credit. 

3. United States History. Mr. McPherson 
This course is planned for teachers of History in the grades. 

Besides a review of the subject matter, attention will be given to 
methods of study and presentation, with use of maps'; outlines, and 
other historical helps. Credit toward Summer School diploma. 
The state texts should be brought from home. 

4. License Review Course in History. Mr. Jack, Mr. Payne 

Similar to above but coming on alternate days. For those who 
wish to stand examinations. 



The University Summer School 49 

5. History of the South. Mr. Jack 
A survey of the social, economic, and political development of the 

South, in which particular attention will be devoted to slavery, the 
plantation system, and the consequent political theories; to section- 
alism and secession; to the period of reconstruction; and to present 
Southern problems. Lectures, reports on special topics, collateral 
reading. Credit toward Summer School diploma. 

6. Advanced U. S. History, (High School). Mr. McPherson 
A survey of historical forces and broader movements resulting in 

the evolution of the United States. Lectures will deal also with the 
economic and social growth of the nation. Recitations will bear 
largely on constitutional and political development. 

Students should come provided with some good high school texts. 
Library work. 

Home Study: West's "American History and Government." 

7. High School License Review. Mr. Payne 
This course is designed to be a study in historical methods, which 

will be illustrated by topics selected from Ancient, English, and 
American history. Outlines of a general nature will be presented 
in an attempt to explain the trend and development of political in- 
stitutions. This course should be helpful for those desiring a gen- 
eral review of these respective fields of history, and also for those 
contemplating taking the state examination for high school teach- 
er's license. Credit toward Summer School diploma. 

The texts adopted by the state are suggested: Botsford's "History 
of the Ancient World;" Coman and Kendall's "Short History of 
England;" Cousins and Hill's "American History." 

History — A Graduate Course. Mr. Payne 

The French Revolution and Napoleon I; an advanced course in 
European history from 1789 to 1815, studied by topics and based 
on some of the standard authorities for this period. Emphasis will 
be placed upon the constitutional experiments of the French Rev- 
olution, and the problems raised by the Napoleonic wars. Some time 
will be given to comparisons of this period with the present Euro- 
pean war. 

A minor course. Prerequisite: At least one year of college work 
in Modern European History. 

8. American Government. Mr. McPherson 
A general course, dealing with the foundation of American polit- 
ical philosophy, the organization of the government, the expansion 
and development of the American system, and the practical work- 
ings of the government, national, state, and local. Attention will 
also be given to governmental organization in Georgia. 



50 The University Summer School 

9. South American and Spanish Customs. Mr. Ramirez 

A course designed to give an insight into the customs, life, and 
civilization of some of the South American peoples; intended 
specially for students of Spanish; short readings in Spanish on South 
American topics; Spanish newspapers and magazines; typical Span- 
ish and Latin-American songs; maps, pictures, social customs illus- 
trated; illustrated lectures. 

1. Economic Geography and Physiography. Mr. Dozier 
This course is intended to trace the growth of the principal in- 
dustries of the various countries of the world. Particular attention 
is given, however, to those of the United States. A study is made 
of the influence of physiography and climate on the location of in- 
dustry and the habits of mankind. Some time is also given to the 
question of the conservation of natural resources. The textbook 
used is J. Russel Smith's "Industrial and Commercial Geography." 
One and one-half hours' credit. 

2. Elementary Economics. Mr. Dozier 
In this course the laws of the production, distribution, and con- 
sumption of wealth are studied. In addition, in so far as time al- 
lows, special topics such as money, banking, and credit, international 
trade and the tariff question, taxation and public expenditures are 
considered. The textbook used is Ely's "Outlines of Economics." 
One and one-half hours credit. 

3. Money and Banking. Mr. Dozier 
In this course the theory of money and banking is studied in 

connection with the history of the growth of money and the develop- 
ment of the bank as a financial institution. Particular attention is 
given to the monetary experience of the United States. The text- 
book used is Moulton's "Money and Banking." One and one-half 
hours credit. 

HOME ECONOMICS. 

The courses in Home Economics are planned with reference to 
meeting present needs, and looking to the addition of courses in 
future sessions to be part of a well graded and progressive series. 
Where the student does satisfactory work and meets the require- 
ment of home study, credit will be given both toward diploma of 
the Summer School and the degree course. Courses 1, 2, 3, and 4 
may give a maximum credit* of one and one-half hours each. 

Free use of libraries will be made, those of the State Normal 
School, State College of Agriculture and University campus being 
available. Educational exhibits in Home Demonstration Work will 
be made and studied. Other illustrative material will be used. 

During the summer of 1918 the courses offered are presented 
with these aims in view: 



The University Summer School 51 

(1) To give preparation suited to the needs of Georgia teachers. 

(2) To furnish an accurate background of some scientific facts 
concerning nutrition including those resulting from recent investi- 
gations. 

(3) To develop skill in the selection and preparation of foods. 

(4) To carry out the instructions of the United States Food Ad- 
ministration and the United States Department of Agriculture with 
reference to teaching effective utilization of local foods, preservation 
of perishable foods, the elimination' of waste and saving of those 
staples which must be reserved for shipment abroad. 

Under the crisis brought about by the present war it is imperative 
that every one be informed as fully as possible concerning the food 
situation. Not only teachers of Home Economics but all educational 
leaders need to know the changes in food habits which must be 
made as a patriotic service. To meet this need a course is prepared 
for the benefit of both men and women who are leaders in counties 
and rural communities. 

All students taking work in cookery are asked to come .provided 
with the following articles: Two all-white aprons made princess 
style, or with bib; four holders, of denim or drilling (white or 
blue), six inches square; four hand towels, three-fourths of a yard 
long. 

All students taking sewing are asked to have the following ar- 
ticles: Thimble, scissors, tape measure, needles, emery, apron, work- 
bag or box. Students taking Red Cross sewing are asked to have in 
addition, large white aprons of lawn or similar material, made all- 
over style, or like those used in cookery. 

1. Foods and Cooking. Miscs Proctor 
The laboratory work will include the study and preparation of 

breads, beverages, eggs, milk and its products, meats, vegetables, 

and fruit desserts. Groups of students will plan and serve meals. 

The menu will be considered in its dietetic, economic, and aesthetic 

aspects. 

The course will have two main purposes: 

(1) To teach the application of the fundamental principles of 
cookery in such a way as to be of practical benefit to the individual; 
and 

(2) To suggest methods of adapting and presenting the subject 
in rural schools and in special classes. Fee, ,$2.00 to cover ma- 
terials used. 

Students will find it helpful to take the theory work iii Course 6, 
Nutrition, in connection with the laboratory course. 

2. Home Demonstration Work. Miss Creswell 
One hour daily of lecture and demonstrations planned not only 



52 The University Summer School 

for teachers and county agents but for superintendents, principals 
and others who want to cooperate with the Home Demonstration 
Agent in carrying out the program for the present year. 

The aims of this course are to meet the present needs in food 
conservation by teaching the proper utilization of local food stuffs, 
the preservation of surplus fruits and vegetables, economies in care 
and handling of food, the substitutions and adaptations necessary to 
save wheat, fat, meat, and sugar. The dietary relationships of foods 
and food habits together with certain psychological factors, will be 
discussed, and changes to effect the proper saving and to increase 
efficiency in adults and to provide for growth of children will be 
outlined. The laboratory work in Course 8 forms an excellent sup- 
plement to this course. 

21. Elementary Sewing. Miss Hill 
The aims of this course are to teach the fundamental principles 

of sewing, to relate the activities of school and home, to develop 

a spirit of unselfish service. 

The course includes training in hand and machine sewing, and 
the use of simple patterns. 

The making of articles comprising a cookery uniform (holder, 
towel, cap, and apron) will form a part of the practical work; these 
are selected as typical problems for sewing classes. The Canning 
Club cap and apron are chosen as the standard. 

In the daily program, suggestions will be given in regard to the 
manner of presenting subjects, planning lessons, and arranging 
courses of study. Two periods daily. Fee, $1.00. Text, "Clothing 
and Health," Kinne & Cooley. 

22. Advdnced Sewing. Miss Hill 
This course is designed to meet the needs of those planning to 

engage in advanced Club work, teach in High Schools, or Agricul- 
tural Schools. Home economics teachers, to meet the opportunity 
for service, should study the national clothing problems of today, 
and this course is planned with that end in view. 

The course embraces both hand and machine sewing, in the mak- 
ing of useful articles for the home, simple underwear, and dress. 
More thorough study of the sewing machine will be required, its 
mechanism, use, and care. Patterns easy of construction will be 
drafted to measure, and compared with commercial patterns. 
Drafted patterns will be used in making underwear; commercial 
pattern used in making Canning Club dresses. The care and repair 
of clothing will be emphasized. Economy in purchase and use of 
material will be stressed. 

The aims of the course are to develop neatness, accuracy, and 
skill; to give the student a view of the econom4c side of the sub- 



The University Summer School 53 

ject; to instill the spirit of thrift, economy, and patriotic service. 
Two Periods Daily — Fee $1.00. 

6. Sewing for the Red Cross. Miss Hill 

This course is arranged for the benefit of teachers who will have 
charge of the Junior Red Cross units in the public schools; and 
includes both theoretical and practical work. Hand and machine 
sewing will be employed. The practical work will consist of (1) 
the making of a few simple articles for hospital supplies, suitable 
for children to make: (2) articles for older girls and students in 
High School classes, comprising hospital supplies, children's cloth- 
ing, hospital garments. A few typical articles will be chosen for 
class work. Samples of other articles will be shown and discussed. 

The "Story of the Red Cross" will form a part of the course. 
Talks will be given to the class on the organization of Junior Red 
Cross Auxiliaries, and the carrying on of the practical work. Red 
Cross Sewing will be under the direction of Madame Lustrat, who is 
the Director of Woman's Work of the Athens Chapter. One Period 
Daily. Fee, 50 cents. 

4. Nutrition. Miss Proctor 

A study of the nutritive value and function of carbohydrates, 
fats, proteins, and mineral matter, their proportion and combination 
in a meal, the energy, protein, and mineral requirements of the 
body as modified by age, occupation and other conditions. 

3. Home Demonstration Work. Mrs. Wood 

A course of laboratory work in food preparation and conserva- 
tion supplemental to Home Demonstration Work. 

This course will be closely connected with the Club Work and 
the relation between the work of the school and the home will be 
constantly stressed. Actual practice will be given in handling and 
packing standard 4-H Brand products, and in the household pro- 
cesses and industries necessary to war service in the home. 

Finished products will be arranged attractively to illustrate the 
educative value of exhibits, and at the end of the course will become 
the property of the student who made them. 

An outline of the work is as follows: 

1. Canning — in tin and in glass. 

2. Drying — fruits and vegetables in home made and commercial 
dryers. 

3. Brining, pickling, and vinegar making. 

4. Bread making — with combinations of materials as wheat flour 
substitutes. 

5. Butter making and the making of cottage cheese. 



54 The University Summer School 

6. Planning meals, and their preparation so as to conserve time, 
labor and materials. 

7. School lunches. 

8. Packing, labelling and storing products for future use in the 
home and for marketing the surplus. Two Periods per Day. Fee, 
$2.00. 

18. Home Designing. Mr. Hart 

This course is offered for the students who specialize in Home 
Economics, and take up the designing of homes, with the expressed 
idea in view of comfort and conveniences at reasonable cost. One 
hour ercdit. 

MATHEMATICS. 

1. Arithmetic. Mr. Hollings worth 
This course is designed especially for teachers of the lower grades 

and for those who expect to take the state examinations. 

Special emphasis will be placed upon regular class-room work 
in both oral and written exercises, with incidental reference to mod- 
ern methods and the latest tendencies in the teaching of the subject. 

The course will include abundant drills in Numeration and Nota- 
tion of integers and decimals, and in the fundamental operations in 
common and decimal fractions, denominate numbers, mensuration of 
plane surfaces, business forms, practical problems, etc. 

At least three sections of the class will be scheduled. Daily reci- 
tations. 

2. Arithmetic. Mr. Moon 
The purpose of this course is to meet the needs of teachers who 

desire a more thorough knowledge and mastery of the essential 
principles and operations of elementary and more advanced arith- 
metic together with the pedagogy of the subject. Lessons and dis- 
cussions covering fractions, compound numbers, longitude and time, 
percentage, commercial discount, profit and loss, commission and 
brokerage, interest, stocks, bonds, taxation, mensuration, progres- 
sions, and the metric system, will be given. These topics will be 
studied with reference to their relations and interdependence, their 
practical use in modern life, and the modern tendencies in arith- 
metic; the proper methods of teaching these topics being made 
prominent. Recitation every day. Credit toward Summer School 
diploma. 

Home Study: The Teaching of Primary Arithmetic, Suzzalo; The 
Teaching of Arithmetic, Stamper; any Standard Text in Arithmetic. 

2a. Arithmetic. A condensed review of Arithmetic for examina- 
tion or other purposes calling for a brief course. Recitation on 
alternate days. 



The University Summer School 55 

3. Methods in Arithmetic. Mr. Moon 

The place and importance of Arithmetic in the modern course 
of study in schools; the present day tendencies in Arithmetic; spe- 
cial attention to the industrial phases of the subject; how the differ- 
ent topics of Arithmetic may be best taught; special study given to 
the difficulties usually met in teaching certain topics and how to 
overcome them; formulas for graduated drill in difficult parts; 
demonstrations with devices and aids; the correlation of Arithmetic 
with other subjects. Credit toward Summer School diploma. 

3. Algebra. Mr. Pond 
A course designed for a review of factoring, equations, fractions, 

and for the study of powers and roots, quadrations, progressions, 
and binomial theorem. Attention will be given to methods of teach- 
ing and historical references. One and one-half hours credit. 

4. Plane Geometry I. Mr. Pond 
This course will cover Books I, II and may be taken by begin- 
ners. Originals will be stressed. Historical data and references 
in connection with the methods of teaching will be combined with 
the practical applications to problems in other branches of Mathe- 
matic. One and one-half hours credit. 

5. Plane Geometry II. 

This course is similar to Course 5 but will cover Books III, IV, 
and V. One and one-half hours credit. 

6. Solid Geometry. 

A course covering the topics usually included in the standard 
texts. (Unless at least three register for this course it will not 
be given). One and one-half hours credit. 

7. High School License, Review. Mr. Stephens 
This course is designed to meet the needs of those preparing to 

stand the state examinations. The first week will be devoted to 
Arithmetic, the next two weeks to Algebra, and the last two weeks 
to Plane Geometry. This is a review course and not for beginners. 
Both subject matter and methods will be discussed. 

8. Plane Trigonometry. Mr. Stephens 

A standard course covering the usual subjects with solutions of 
triangles and manipulation of formulas. One hour credit. 
Text: Hun & Mclnnes' Trigonometry. 

9. Elementary Analyms, (Mathematics 2 Mr. Pond 

A study of Co-ordinates; plotting of Algebra and Transcendental 
curves; discussion of the straight line and circle analytically; func- 
tional relations. 

Six hours per week for five weeks. One and one-half hours credit. 



d6 The University Summer School 

10. Introduction to Calculus, (Mathematics 3). Mr. Pond 
Advanced Algebra — (Mathematics 4). 

The first half of this course will be an introduction to Calculus, 
while the second half will take up the following topics: Complex 
Numbers, Determinants, Partial Fractions, Series, Theory of Equa- 
tions. 

Nine hours per week for 8 weeks. Three hours credit. 

Mathematics — A Graduate Course. Mr. Stephens 

One of the following courses will be given if at least two students 
elect it. Two of the courses constitute a minor; three, with a thesis, 
constitute a major. Prerequisites: Mathematics 5 (Advanced Cal- 
culus). 

1. Differential Equations. An elementary course in ordinary and 
partial differential equations, with special reference to the equations 
occurring in the physical sciences. Text: Cohen or Murray. 

2. Vector Analysis. An elementary course in vectors which de- 
velops a system of coordinates and illustrates their use in certain 
mathematical and physical problems. Reference text: Coffin. 

3. Projective Geometry. A course in pure geometry based upon 
one of the following texts with the others as references: Holgate's, 
Reve, Cremona, Veblen and Young. 

4. Theoretical Mechanics. An analytical treatment of certain 
problems in statics and dynamics with the aid of the Calculus. Many 
problems will be used. Text: Ziwet and Field, or Jeans. 

5. Theory of Functions. An introductory course to the theory 
of functions of a real and a complex variable. Reference works: 
Harkness and Morley, Durege, Goursat. . 

PHYSICAL TRAINING. 

That the teacher of Physical Education has a large responsibility 
and opportunity is no longer doubted. That this opportunity comes 
more through the social, moral and spiritual aspects of the work 
than through the so-called physical is also conceded. Thus the 
place which physical education should hold in the school system is 
easily emphasized. Not only in the school system but in the com- 
munity at large does the role of games and recreation play a most 
important part. It is, therefore, especially important that correct 
physical education and correct athletic coaching be emphasized in 
all constructive program. 

During the 1918 University Summer School for Teachers special 
emphasis will be placed upon physical education. 



The University Summer School 57 

Fees. Although the variety of courses is large and the scope 
of the work wide, there will be no fees charged for courses in 
physical education, except a small fee for swimming. 

Facilities. The gymnasium at the University and at the State 
Normal School will be at the disposal of men and women. The 
swimming pool will be under the supervision of one of the directors 
of physical education and convenient hours will be arranged. A drill 
room for teaching elementary school games will be available for reg- 
ular class room work. The campus and athletic fields of the Uni- 
versity will also be at the disposal of the teachers, while tennis 
courts and the Country Club golf links may be used by those desiring 
this type of athletics. 

Exhibitions. At the close of the Summer School, the several de- 
partments will give specimen exhibitions of work suitable for any 
community: folk dances and games, school games and playground 
programs, physical exercise drills, wand and dumb-bell drills. There 
will be opportunity also for exhibitions in swimming and private con- 
sultation with the instructors. 

Physical Education Courses are planned especially for teachers 
wishing to prepare themselves to conduct similar work in grade 
and high schools, or advanced classes. Carefully outlined courses 
in gymnasium work are arranged, including Folk Dances and games 
to meet the needs of playground and schoolroom. The courses are 
intended to be attractive as well as physically beneficial. 

Loose clothing permitting freedom of movement and heelless 
shoes constitute the ideal dress for this work. 

1. Grades I-IV. Miss Pratz 

Open to all students. 

The course includes practice in Correct Posture: best sitting and 
standing positions; for the first grade; Story Plays; Fireman; Go- 
ing Nutting, for second grade, and in Grades III and IV. Folk 
Dances, Ace of Diamonds, Finnish Reel, Gymnastics, involving more 
skill, endurance; games more vigorous; Jolly is the Miller, Relays, 
Flag. 

2. Grades V-VIII. Mies Pratz 
Open to all students. 

This course includes: 

1. Formal Swedish Day's Order of Gymnastics, including correc- 
tive exercises. 

2. Folk Dances, Vineyard Frolic, Reap the Flag, Sailor's Hornye. 

3. Games: Dodge Ball, Three Deep. 



58 The University Summer School 

3. Hi h School. Miss Pratz 

Open to all students. 

1. Formal Gymnastics. 

2. Athletics. 

3. Dancing. 

1. Athletic, Leo Friedman's Sun Dance; Ostend. 

2. Folk, Irish Lect., Highland Schottische. 

4. Games, Volley Ball, Corner Ball, Relay, etc. 

•4. Advanced Physical Education. Miss Pratz 

Open to all students with a previous knowledge and training in 
this work. This course will include carefully arranged and chosen 
work, involving more difficult phases of Physical Education. 

5. Elementary Gymnastics. Miss Charlton 
Games, Folk and Aesthetic Dancing. 

6. Intermediate — For Intermediate and Private 

Classes. Miss Charlton 

Gymnastics: Wands, Dumb-Bells, Indian Clubs. Games: Folk 
and Aesthetic Dancing. Basket Ball. 

7. Advanced — For Students who Have Had Previous 

Training. Miss Charlton 

Gymnastics: Wands and Indian Clubs. Tactics, Aesthetic and 
Classic Dancing. Basket Ball (Women's Rules). 

8. Play Hour. Miss Pratz 
Open to all students, men and women. On certain evenings of 

each week there will be conducted on the lawn a play hour. No 
registration is necessary for this work. The play hour is designed 
to furnish recreation for the student and to give instruction in 
plays and games suitable for adult community life as well as that 
of the children. 

9. Swimming. Miss Pratz 
The swimming pool will be open for women on all days at suitable 

hours. General instruction will be given in the different strokes 
and in diving. Definite regulations guard the safety of the students. 
The pool will be open at stated periods as indicated above. A maid 
will be in attendance. 

SCIENCE. 

1. Hygiene and Sanitation, Physiology. Mr. Campbell 

Two sections will be conducted in this subject, each meeting three 

times weekly. The work will be based on the state adopted text, 

Ritchie and Caldwell's Primer of Hygiene and Sanitation, and the 



The University Summer School 59 

object will be to give as much assistance as possible to grade teach- 
ers who are preparing to stand the state examinations, or who wish 
additional instruction in teaching this subject. Lectures, slides, 
simple dissections, models, will illustrate the text. Credit toward 
Summer School diploma. 

2. General Biology. Mr. Campbell 

This course will continue through the entire summer session, and 
will be based on the state adopted text, Bailey and Coleman. As 
much laboratory work will be brought into the course as possible, 
and every effort will be made to help the student to acquire as high 
a degree of efficiency as possible in preparation for teaching High 
School Biology. Open to beginners as well as to those who have 
had previous training in Biology. Daily. Home Study to be as- 
signed. Credit toward Summer School diploma. 

Zoology — College Course. Mr. Campbell 

This course is intended to cover fully the exact ground included 
in Zoology 3 in the University, and students completing it will re- 
ceive full credit either toward a university degree or for entrance 
to the Medical School. Students will not be admitted to this course 
unless they present a minimum of fourteen entrance units which 
have been accepted by the entrance committee of the University 
or other colleges in which they may wish to use the credit. 

Any students who undertake this work must recognize that it will 
occupy nearly all of their working time, and that at most they can 
undertake but one other course. The necessity is emphasized of 
being present on the opening day, provided with dissecting instru- 
ments, drawing materials, and the necessary books. 

As in the college course, a fee of $2.50 is charged each student 
to cover materials actually consumed. Three hours credit. 

1. High School Physics for Teachers — (Electricity, 

sound and light). Mr. Hendren and Mr. Cantrell 

This course is especially designed to meet the needs of the high 
school teacher of Physics who wishes to review the fundamental 
principles with a view to mastering the best methods of presenting 
them clearly. The applicant should have previously taken a good 
High School Course. The method which is presented is to group 
the discussions and recitation work around a series of well designed 
demonstration and laboratory experiments in order to give the stu- 
dent a concrete grasp of fundamental phenomena. The division of 
time between recitation and individual laboratory work will be that 
adopted in the best schools — three single periods of recitation to 
two double periods in laboratory work — and an effort will be made 
to show how the laboratory work and recitation work should be co- 



60 



The University Summer School 



ordinated in a good course. It is realized that the average Georgia 
high school has very little equipment for properly teaching Physics 
and this fact will be kept in mind in the conduct of the course. 

The time required for the course will be one period of class work 
or two periods of laboratory work each day. In this course half the 
subject matter of a standard high school course will be covered, the 
other half of the subject matter covering mechanics, molecular 
physics and heat may be taken in connection with Physics 3. Credit 
toward diploma. 

2. Physics Laboratory. Mr. Hendren and Mr. Cantrell 
A laboratory course only, offered for teachers who wish to famil- 
iarize themselves with the details and methods of treatment of a 
standard list of individual laboratory experiments. The list of ex- 
periments to be performed by each student will be selected with 
reference to his individual needs and may be of either high school or 
college grade. Time required — two hours each afternoon, five 
afternoons per week. Credit toward Summer School diploma. 

3. General Science. Mr. Hendren and Mr. Cantrell 
A course designed for high school teachers who wish to prepare to 

teach a course in General Science in the first or second year of the 
high school course. Only those topics will be taken up which are 
simple and will appeal to the average boy or girl's natural interest 
in phenomena around them. This course is also offered for the 
general Summer School student who wishes to learn something of 
the simpler and more interesting facts of nature. Time required — 
six hours per week recitation and discussion. For those who desire 
it three periods per week of laboratory work will be offered. 

-i. Physics (1 or 2). Mr. Hendren and Mr. Cantrell 

An elementary course in college physics equivalent to Physics 1 
or 2 as offered in regular session. Eleven hours per week recita- 
tion and ten hours per week laboratory for eight weeks. Three 
hours credit. 

Any of the above courses can be taken for credit on the Summer 
School diploma. Witn additional outside reading or laboratory 
work they can be counted as Home Study courses. 

1. Elementary Chemistry. Mr. White 

An introduction to the study of Chemistry, involving thorough 
study of typical elements and compounds, with a view to under- 
standing the nature of chemical energy, the characteristics of chem- 
ical phenomena and the fundamental laws of chemical action. Lec- 
tures (illustrated by experiments) and recitations. No textbook 
used but suitable reference books will be placed at the disposal of 
students. Credit toward Summer School diploma. 



The University Summer School 61 

A course of laboratory instruction and experiments to accompany 
the above. No text. Syllabus provided. 
Home Study: MacPherson and Henderson. 

2. Chemistry in the Home. Mr. White 
Lecture course on the chemistry of food, including agricultural 

chemistry, the chemistry of nutrition, pure foods and adulterations. 
Lectures and rcci'ations. No textbook required. 

Home Study: Thorpe, Industrial Chemistry; Sherman, Chemistry 
of Food and Nutrition. Credit toward. Summer School diploma. 

3. Chemistry 2a. Mr. White 
College Course in inorganic chemistry 3 hours per day of class 

room and laboratory work. This is the first year course of chemistry 
required of students in the Medical Courses. Supplementary work 
may be required. 

Text: Alexander Smith's "General Chemistry." Four hours 
credit. 

4. Agricultural Chemistry. Mr. Worsham 
(See Agriculture). 

1. Primary Geography. Miss Zeigler and Miss Johnson 

This course is planned to offer the principles and methods neces- 
sary for the teacher to know in presenting geography to the first 
four grades in our schools. Work in Home Geography will be out- 
lined and discussed in this cla.rs, local studies will be inado as far as 
time permits, and the field of general geography will be rapidly re- 
viewed. Bring the state adopted text, Frye. for general use. 

2. Advanced Geography. Miss Zeigler and Miss Johnson 

The work in Advanced Geography will cover the Held of the sec- 
ond book in the state adopted texts. A study will be made of the 
United States, its physiography, industries and political divisions. 
Relationship to European countries will be stressed and a general 
review of world geography will be given. As much time as prac- 
tical will be spent in studying the geography of Georgia. Bring 
the state adopted text. 

3. Advanced Economic Geography — (See Social Sciences.) 

DRAWING AND HANDICRAFTS. 

1. Elementary Drawing and Painting. Miss Holliday 

The purpose of this course is to present practical methods for 
elementary grades, and includes: 

Nature Study, Drawing simple objects, Illustration, Perspective, 
Color. 



62 



The University Summer School 



2. Advanced Drawing and Painting. Miss Holliday 
This is a study of methods and mediums suitable for upper gram- 
mar grades, and high school. It includes: 

Advanced color, Still life, Life, Artistic Anatomy, Outdoor Sketch- 
ing, Cast drawing. Credit toward Summer School diploma. 

3. Decoratdve Design. Miss Holliday 
This course will be the study of the principles of design and the 

application of them in the school room. Also special attention will 
be given to the designing of posters to be used in the school, ad- 
vertising war campaigns. 

Principles of design, Color schemes, Lettering, Decoration ap- 
plied to objects useful in schoolroom, Posters, Street car cards. 

4. Primary Drawing. Miss Taylor 
A course for the first four grades. Practical lessons and correla- 
tion with methods of teaching. 

5. Handicrafts for Primary Grades. Miss Taylor 
Paper folding, and cutting, construction of furniture for doll's 

house, clay modeling, weaving, raffia work, and simple basketry. 

Self-expression through hand work is the right of every child. 
This course is planned to supply the basis for work of this kind in 
the primary grades. Credit toward Summer School diploma. 

Reference Books: "A Year-Book for Primary Grades," Graves 
and Watkins; "Story Telling with the Scissors," Beckwith; "Pri- 
mary Handwork," Ledyard and Breckenfeld; "The Way of the 
Clay," Milton Bradley; "Correlated Handwork," Trybom and Kel- 
ler; "Cardboard Construction," Hammel. 



PENMANSHIP. 

Feeling that teachers generally are interested in methods of 
teaching practical penmanship and are anxious to master this sub- 
ject, classes in the Palmer Method with adaptations to the state 
adopted books, will be conducted each day. Considerable time will 
be devoted to: 

Methods of teaching muscular moveYnent writing as related to 
all grades. 

The eight essential steps in the Palmer Method. 

Writing for primary, intermediate and advanced classes. 

Model classes. 

Blackboard lessons. 

Advanced writing for teachers. 

The problem of the rural teacher. 

Examination and issuing of the Palmer Method Teachers' Cer- 
tificate. 



The University Summer School 63 

1. Primary Penmanship. Miss Banks 

This course will give teachers practice in the forearm move- 
ments with a view of training them to write properly. These 
principles will be applied to primary grade work, giving" meth- 
ods of teaching writing to small children. The Palmer Method will 
be used with adaptations to the state adopted books. Drill in black- 
board writing wlil be given. 

2. Elementary Penmanship. Miss Banks 

Efforts will be made to give teachers skill in writing, using the 
general principles of the Palmer Method of freehand movements. 
Teachers must first learn to write properly before they can suc- 
cessfully teach writing. Methods in grade work will be exemplified 
in the class-room work. Additional practice hours in blackboard 
and pen writing may be arranged. One credit toward Summer 
School diploma. 

MUSIC. 

1. Primary Music — Primary Division. Mr. Cunningham 

The first steps in singing and sight reading for the first four 
grades; suggestions on teaching; suggestions for Primary grades; 
suggestions for city and rural school teachers. 

2. Public School Music — Elementary Division. 

Mr. Cunningham 

This course is for teachers of the 5th, 6th, and 7th grades. Work 
of each year will be outlined, and each fundamental principle as it 
occurs will be taken up for detail study. Problems which confront 
teachers and supervisors will be thoroughly discussed. 

3. Public School Music — Arts and Crafts Division. 

Mr. Cunningham 

This course is designed primarily for grade teachers and in- 
cludes not only methods but a musical training. A teacher who 
completes the work satisfactorily will have received thorough train- 
ing on sight reading, ear training, and the elements of music, and 
will be able to qualify in states where an examination is required. 

The work of each year will be outlined and each fundamental 
principle as it occurs will be taken up for detailed study. Prob- 
lems which confront the teacher and supervisor will be thor- 
oughly discussed. The methods employed are those used in the 
school room and will demonstrate the material and methods used 
in teaching music in the public school from the kindergarten to 
the high school. 



64 The University Summer School 

4. Chorus. Mr. Cunningham 

There will be a chorus of mixed voices, which every one of fair 
musical ability is invited to join. It is expected that this organiza- 
tion will give a public performance at the close of the summer ses- 
sion. (All students who desire credit in music must belong to this 
chorus. 

MANUAL. TRAINING. 

1. Wood Work. Mr. Hart 
This will be a course in the use of tools and a graded series in the 

making of many things of wood. There will be some training in the 
handling of elementary tools, their sharpening and use, with exer- 
cises in the use of the square, thumb gauge, saws, chisels, and planes. 
Credit toward Summer School diploma. 

2. Force Work. Mr. Hart 
A course treating the manufacture of iron and steel, tool-making 

and tempering, and the making of things of iron. 

Correlated with the above work, where needed, instruction will 
be given in drawing and in making working models. Credit toward 
Summer School diploma. 

3. Agricultural Engineering. Mr. Hart 
Modification of courses will be shaped to suit the demand in Agri- 
cultural Engineering lb of teachers who want help along the lines. 
No college credit for these courses as modified. 

See also Agricultural Engineering. 

LAW 

Mr. Nix. 

The courses in Law in the summer session are designed to assist 
those who do not have the requisite credits in Law to entitle them 
to enroll regularly in the senior class of the School of Law, or who 
desire to shorten the actual time required to complete the six year 
course of study for Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Law degrees. 

A fee of thirty ($30) dollars is charged of all students who regis- 
ter for courses in Law in the summer session. 

Not more than three courses can be taken in the Summer School, 
and the instructor must be satisfied as to the student's preparation 
to undertake these courses. The subjects offered are Agency, Muni- 
cipal Corporations, Insurance and Constitutional Law. (Three to 
be chosen). 

Further information concerning this work can be had from H. A. 
Nix, Secretary Law School Faculty, Athens, Ga. 

For fuller description of the courses see the college catalogue. 



The University Summer School 65 

GRADUATION FROM THE UNIVERSITY 
SUMMER SCHOOL FOR TEACHERS 

The Demand for the Work: The increasing number of alumni 
of the University of Georgia Summer School for Teachers and 
the growing demand for Teacher's Diploma with the title, Gradu- 
ate of the University Summer School, have emphasized this aspect 
of the Summer School work as both important and popular. In 
response to this demand and to many inquiries, the following in- 
formation is given to facilitate the selection of courses and the 
completion of work already begun. And while special emphasis 
is placed in this Bulletin upon Home Study, the general require- 
ments are explained so that the way to graduation may be made 
clear. 

What the Diploma Is: The diploma of graduation of the Univer- 
sity Summer School is one of the services offered by the University 
Summer School for Teachers. The Trustees of the University of 
Georgia have granted the Summer School the right to award di- 
plomas of graduation and these are formally awarded by the Chan- 
cellor of the University at the closing of commencement exercises 
of each summer session. At the same time the State Department 
of Education has recognized the Teacher's Diploma as a type of 
professional training which should grant the holder a professional 
license to teach. Thus a graduate of the University Summer School 
for Teachers, while becoming an alumnus of the institution, au- 
tomatically receives a Teacher's Diploma and a First Grade 
license to teach in the schools of Georgia. It should be remembered 
however, that this is not the only way to receive such a license; 
for it may be received (1) by standing the regular State examina- 
tions (These are also held at the end of the University Summer 
School at Athens). (2) by graduating from an approved college 
with the necessary courses in Education (3) by graduating from 
an approved normal school with the necessary courses in Edu- 
cation (4) by graduating from the University Summer School for 
Teachers. Thus this last course is preferred by many teachers 
who want more in their training than the mere routine examina- 
tions and it offers the desired training and certificates for those who 
may not be graduates of approved colleges or normal schools. 

Advantage of Diploma. The advantages offered by a course 
of study leading to the Diploma are several: 

It offers opportunity to become a graduate of the University of 
Georgia Summer School for Teachers by attending a number of 
Summer sessions without interrupting the regular year's work of 
teaching. 

It offers opportunity to obtain a permanent Professional Teach- 



66 The University Summer School 

ers Certificate or license to teach in the common and public schools 
of Georgia. 

It offers opportunity to carry on advanced work in studies not 
previously taken in school or college. 

It rewards persistency in the performance of consistent, yet 
pleasant, study at home in connection with summer enrollment at 
the University. 

With these values is added the opportunity to come in contact 
with large numbers of the best teachers in Georgia; with specialists 
not only from Georgia but from all parts of the country; and the 
opportunity to combine study and recreation to a profitable degree. 

General Requirements for the Diploma. There are certain general 
requirements which the candidate must meet in order to quality 
for the diploma. These general requirements apply to both types 
of diplomas and are as follows: 

Graduation from an approved high school or college or the equiv- 
alent therefor. 

Completion of at least three summer sessions in residence to- 
gether with the required work designated. 

This work to consist of at least ten courses of study. 

Of these ten courses not more than four may be counted for cred- 
its in any one session. 

Special Requirements for the Diploma. The Teacher's diploma 
for Professional License to teach — that is, graduation from the 
University Summer School for Teachers — may give either a general 
Elementary Certificate or a High School Certificate, in accordance 
with the wishes and electives of the student. Both are issued on 
approval of the State Department of Education under standard reg- 
ulation and inspection, and differ only in subject matter required. 
The differences are cited below: 

The General Elementary Certificate. The State regulation grant- 
ing the elementary certificate is as follows: "A graduate of the 
University Summer School of the state shall be eligible for a Pro- 
fessional Elementary Certificate, the same to be granted after a 
plan similar to that provided for a graduate of an approved normal 
school for such a certificate. This will be valid for three years in 
elementary schools coming under the direction of said board, and 
renewable as provided for Professional Elementary Certificates." 

The selection of studies to meet the above requirements will con- 
form to the following schedule: 



Tlte University Summer School 



67 



GROUP I. 
Required 

Principles of 
Teaching (General 
Elementary meth- 
ods). 

Psychology o r 
Child Study. 

School Manage- 
ment. 

History of Educa- 



GROUP II. 

Optional 

Any two advanc- 
ed Courses not pre- 
viously covered in 
High School or Col- 
lege. 



GROUP III. 

Optional 

Any other four 
additional courses 
valuable in Elemen- 
tary work. 



All of Group I, and at least three from 
Groups II and III must have home study. 



tion. 

All optional courses to be approved by the Superintendent. 

The High School Certificate. The state regulation granting the 
High School Certificate is as follows: "If the course completed by 
the graduate of the University Summer School include four sub- 
jects of College grade, or acceptable courses not previously included 
in the high school course of the graduate, the certificate granted 
shall be valid also for three years in High School grades of schools 
coming under the direction of said board and renewals for three 
year periods." The selection of studies to meet the above require- 
ments will conform to the following schedule: 



GROUP I. 
Required 

High School ad- 
ministration or Su- 
pervision. 

Educational Psy- 
chology. 

School Manage- 
ment. 

History of Educa- 
tion. 



GROUP II. 

Optional 

Any four other 
advanced courses 
not previously cov- 
ered in High School 
or College. 



GROUP III. 

Optional 

Any other two 
courses selected 
from High School 
subjects, suitable to 
high school teach- 
ing. 

All of Group I and at least three from 
Groups II and III must have bom? study. 



All optional courses must be approved by the Superintendent. 

HOME STUDY ASSIGNMENTS. 

An examination of the Summer School Bulletin shows a large 
number of courses, of wide variety, from which to select the optional 
studies. In most cases home study is assigned so that the Candida t 1 
for the diploma may find little difficulty in choosing the required 
subjects at the same time that he or she specializes in the desir ; a 
work. 



68 



The University Summer School 

GUIDE INDEX 



Administration, Board of _____ 3 

Agricultural Club Work 31-32 

Agricultural Engineering _____ 32 

Agriculture 27-33 

Algebra _55 

American Fiction _______ -42 

American Government ______ 49 

Arithmetic __________ 54-55 

Arts and Crafts 61-62 

Blackboard Sketching 61 

Biology 58-59 

Calculus _____________ 56 

Calisthenics, Gymnastics. Games 56-57 
Chemistry __________ 60-61 

Child Study 39 

Chorus _____________64 

Civics ______________ 49 

College Credit 14 

Demonstration School _______ 36 

Drawing and Handicrafts _ _ _ 61-62 
Dormitories __________ 19 

Economics _ _ _ 50 

Education _________ 33-40 

English 40-44 

Expression _________ 44-45 

Examinations _________ 21-22 

Faculty. List of ________ 4-11 

Floriculture and Landscape 

Gardening _________ 2S 

Foods and Cookery _______ 51 

Foreign Languages ______ 46-47 

French 48 

General Information ______ 12-26 

General Science __________60 

Georgia Manual _________ 33 

Geography ____________ 61 

•graphic Influences ______ 61 

Geometry ____________ 5.") 

German ______________ 47 

Glee Clubs 04 

Graduate School _________ 15 

Graduation Requirement _____ 66 

ek _____________ 44 

High School Administration _ _ _ 38 
1 1 i _r h School Literature _____ 41 
History of Education _______ 36 

History 48-50 

Home Economics for Rural 

hools ____________ 54 



Household Arts _______ 50-54 

Hygiene and Sanitation, 

License Review ________ 58 

Information, General _____ 12-26 

Latin _____________ 47 

Language and Grammar _____ 43 

Law _____________64 

Literary Criticism ________ 45 

Literature __________ 42-45 

Manual Training ________ 64 

Mathematics __________ 54 

Music 63-64 

Nature Study. Primary and Ele. _ 32 

Officers _____________3 

Prizes _____________ 67 

Penmanship __________ 62-3 

Physical Education ______ 56-58 

Physics _____60 

Physiology and Hygiene. Ele. _ 61 
Playground Work ________ 57 

Preparatory Courses _______ 16 

Primary Methods _36 

Principles of Teaching, Ele. _ _ _ 36 
Psychology 30-39 

Registration __________ 22-24 

Reading. Phonics, Spelling _ _ _ 35 
Rural Life and Education 37 

School Gardening _ 30-31 

School Management _______ 36 

School Supervision _______ 35 

Science 53-61 

Sewing 52-53 

Shakespeare _________ 41-42 

Smith-Hughes Vocational Work _ LB 
South American Customs _____ ~" 

Social Sciences __________ 50 

Spanish _____________ 47 

Swimming __________ 58 

Teachers' Bureau ________ _4 

Teaching of Composition _____ 41 

The Novel -43 

Trigonometry __________ 55 

Vocational Supervision ______ 37 

Vocational Agriculture ______ 38 

Zoology ______-__-_-- 59 






The University Summer School 

To Those Interested in Attending the University 

Summer School 

IT WILL HE WELL: 

To consider carefully the possibilities and opportunities which the 
teaching profession offers at this time. It is important to stand 
together in the determination to do our part and to expect a 
commensurate recognition. 

To read the Bulletin carefully. It contains the information you 
wish, for the most part and will answer most inquiries. If not 
do not hesitate to write for further information. 

To make special inquiry of the ticket agent for any special railroad 
rates that are offered. Do not wait until you are ready to pur- 
chase your ticket. Special rates have been authorized for June 
29, 30, July 1, 2, 15, 16, 22, 29, August 6. 

To reserve your room early so that you may thus facilitate all 
arrangements. If for any good reason you cannot come, you 
will be released from reservation without fee of any sort. Xo 
deposit is required for reservation at Normal School, but to in- 
sure reservation at the University the fee of $4.00 should be 
sent with application. See pages 18, 19 and 20. 

To fill out the blank below if you plan to attend. This will con- 
fer a favor upon the Summer School management and aid in 
making the stay of all pleasant and profitable. 

Then, to plan your trip carefully, bringing all necessary equip- 
ment to remain the full time and enjoy the summer to the 
utmost. 

Superintendent Howard W. Odum, 
University Summer School, 
Athens, Ga. 
Dear Sir: 

It is my present intention to attend the 1918 University Summer 
School. If for any reason I cannot attend, it is understood that this 
notice is not binding:. I am specially interested in the following 
courses: 



Full Xame. 
Address 






/OLUME XIX 



AUGUST, 1919 



NUMBER 7 



BULLETIN OF THE 

UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 







'£o 



UA 



GENERAL CATALOGUE 
1919-1920 



Entered at the Post Office at Athens, Ga., as Second Class Matter, August 31. 1905, 
under Act of Congress of July 16th, 1904. Issued Monthly by the University. 

SERIAL NUMBER 301 



ANNOUNCEMENT OF THE 



University of Georgia 



For the Session of 1919-1920 



With a Register of Officers and Students for 
the Session of 1918-1919. 



Chartered A. D. 1785 



CALENDAR 1919-1920 



June 30, Monday: 
August 2, Saturday 
September 13: 
September 15: 
September 15-18: 
September 17: 
November 27: 
December 23: 
January 2: 
January 2: 
January 19: 
February 21: 



February 22: 
March 20: 
March 22: 
May 20: 
June 7: 
June 10: 
Juno 10-12: 
June 11, Friday: 
June 12, Saturday: 
June 13, Sunday: 
June 14, Monday: 



June 15, Tuesday: 



Juno 16, Wednesday 



Opening of the Summer School. 

Close of the Summer School. 

Meeting of the Faculty. 

First day of Registration. 

Examinations for Entrance. 

Opening of the First Term. 

Thanksgiving Day. 

Close of the First Term. 

Opening of the Second Term. 

Opening of the Short Courses. 

Birthday of General R. E. Lee. 

Exercises in commemoration of the 119th 
Anniversary of the Demosthenian Society 
and the 100th Anniversary of the Phi 
Kappa Society. 

Washington's Birthday. 

Close of the Second Term. 

Opening of the Third Term. 

Last date for submission of Prize Essays. 

Meeting of the Board of Visitors. 

Annual Session of the Board of Trustees. 

Examinations for entrance. 

4:00 P. M. f Military exercises and drill. 

8:30 P. M., Sophomore declamation contest. 

11:00 A. M., Baccalaureate sermon. 

10:30 A. M., Exercises of the undergraduates 
representing the branches of the Univer- 
sity. 

8:30 P. M., Champion debate between the Phi 
Kappa and Demosthenian Societies. 

10:30 A. M., Business meeting of the Alumni 

Society. 
12 M., Oration before the Alumni Society. 
4:30 P. M., Junior orations and delivery of 

Sophomore cup. 

Commencement Day. Close of the 120th 
annual session. 



HISTORICAL 



The University of Georgia was chartered "by the General Assembly 
of the State, January 27, 1785. The charter is entitled "An act for 
the more full and complete establishment of a public seat of learn- 
ing in this State," and its preamble, to use the language of. a dis- 
tinguished president of the institution, "would do honor t^ ?ny 
legislature, and willstand a monument to the wisdom and patriotism 
of those who framed and of those who adopted it." r 

The independence of Georgia, as a State, had just been acknowl- 
edged, and, says the preamble, "It should be among the first objects 
of those who wish well to the national prosperity to encourage and 
support the principles of religion and morality, and early to place 
the youth under the forming hand of society, that, by instruction, 
they may be moulded to the love of virtue and good order." 

Founded with the purpose thus indicated, the University was 
possessed only of "an unproductive and, for the most part, unin- 
habited tract of land," and it was not until July 6th. 1801, that 
George Walton, Abraham Baldwin, John Milledge, and Hugh Lawson, 
acting as a committee of the Senatus Academicus. selected the 
historic site on which the parent institution at Athens now stands. 
During that year the University was opened. 

The general scheme of organization and the course of study, after 
the /fashion of the English colleges of that time, provided for the 
single collegiate degree of "Bachelor of Arts." Literature, with 
the so-called disciplinary studies, constituted the entire curriculum. 
For Science, as it is recognized today, no provision was made. 

For more than half a century the history of the University was 
the history of Georgia. Many of those who afterwards added to. the 
distinction of the State in peace and in war received their training 
here during this period. 

But no college thus designed could keep pace with the growth 
and diffusion of knowledge. The expanding intelligence of the nine- 
teenth century demanded wider areas of culture and knowledge. 
Science added new fields to human thought. With new knowledge 
came the impelling force which planted scientific and technical 
schools throughout the world. In July, 1862, the Congress of the 
United States granted to each of the States a munificent donation 
of public lands for the purpose of establishing a college in which 
science and its application to agriculture and the mechanic arts 
should be taught. The funds arising from the sale of Georgia's quota 
of the land scrip were transferred by the State to the Trustees of 
the University of Georgia. May, 1872, and the Trustees at once 



UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 5 

established the Georgia State College of Agriculture and the 
Mechanic Arts, as a coordinate department of the institution at 
Athens. In accordance with the act of Congress, the "leading ob- 
ject" in this college is, "without excluding other scientific and 
classical studies, and including military tactics, to teach such 
branches of learning as are related to agriculture and the mechanic 
arts." 

After this step had been taken toward broadening the scope of 
the University's activity, other developments followed rapidly. 

In August, 1867, the Lumpkin Law School, at Athens (incorpora- 
ted 1859), was merged into and became the Law Department of the 
University. In October, 1872, the North Georgia Agricultural Col- 
lege became a department of the University through a contract 
made by the local trustees, and in July, 1873, by arrangement with 
the local trustees of the Georgia Medical College (founded in 1829), 
at Augusta, this institution became the Medical Department of the 
University. 

By the Constitution of Georgia (adopted 1877), the appropriation 
of public funds for education other than "the elementary branches 
of an English education" was permitted to the University only. The 
following institutions have been established by legislative enact- 
ments as departments or "branches" of the University and placed 
»nder general control of its Board of Trustees. Each is maintained 
in whole or in part by annual appropriations from the State Treas- 
ury. The Georgia School of Technology, at Atlanta, established 
1885; the Georgia Normal and Industrial College for Girls, at Mil- 
ledgeville, established 1889; the Georgia Industrial College for 
Colored Youths, near Savannah, established 1890; the State Normal 
School, near Athens, established 1895; the South Georgia Normal 
College, at Valdosta, established 1906. 

The growth of the University at Athens may be seen from the 
number of departments which have been established there in recent 
years; the School of Pharmacy, established in 1903; the Summer 
School, authorized by an act of the General Assembly in 1897, and 
put on a permanent foundation by an appropriation of the General 
Assembly in 1904; the School of Forestry, established in 1906 
through the generous aid of Mr. George Foster Peabody; the School 
of Education, established in 1908; the School of Commerce, estab- 
lished in 1912. 

In the summer of 1906, the Legislature established the Georgia 
State College of Agriculture and directed the Governor to appoint 
Trustees charged with its management. At the same session of 
the Legislature an industrial and agricultural school was established 
in each of the eleven congressional districts of the State as a branch 
of this college and under the general supervision of its board of 



6 UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

trustees. These are located at Statesboro, Tifton, Americus, Carroll- 
ton, Monroe, Barnesville, Powder Springs, Madison, Clarkesville, 
Granite Hill, and Cochran. 

By resolution of the Board of Trustees, women will be admitted 
to the College of Agriculture and the Mechanic Arts and to the 
Peabody School of Education, beginning with the session of 1919- 
1920. 

SUPPORT 

The University is supported partly by taxation of the people of 
the State, partly by the income from federal grants, and partly by 
income from private gifts. 

The federal government has made three grants for the support 
of the College of Agriculture and the Mechanic Arts; the original 
land grant of 1868; the grant of 18.87 for the support of agricultural 
experiment stations in connection with the College of Agriculture, 
and the supplementary grant of 1890. 

In 1895 the State appropriated $29,000 for the erection and 
equipment of Science Hall. Since that time it has appropriated 
money for five other buildings, adding greatly to the efficiency of 
the institution. For maintenance the State pays the sum of $60,000 
annually, and has added an annual appropriation of $7,500 for the 
Summer School. In addition, the sum of $60,000 is appropriated 
annually for the maintenance of the State College of Agriculture; 
with $40,000 for Extension Work, and $2,500 for Farmers' Insti- 
tutes; also the sum of $88,109.14 for the year 1918-19, to meet the 
Federal appropriation to Georgia under the terms and provisions of 
the act of Congress, approved May 8th. 1914. 

The most considerable gifts that have come to the University are: 

The original donation of 35,000 acres of public lands by the State. 

The donation of 660 acres of land to the University by Governor 
John Milledge, on which a part of the city of Athens now stands. 

The Moore College building, costing $25,000, the gift of the city 
of Athens. 

The Charles F. McCay fund, available about 1970, estimated to 
amount ultimately to several million dollars. 

The Charles McDonald Brown fund of $50,000, the gift of Gov- 
ernor Joseph E. Brown, for aid of students. This fund now amounts 
to $205,824.70. 

The William Terrell fund of $20,000 for the support of a chair of 
Agricultural Chemistry. 

The Library building, costing $50,000, the gift of George Foster 
Peabody, of New York. 

The Alumni fund, amounting to nearly $60,000. 



UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 7 

A fund of approximately $30,000, contributed by friends of the 
University (190 6) for the purchase of land for enlarging the campus, 
and an equal amount contributed subsequently. 

The Denmark fund of $4,000, given by the late Brantley A. 
Denmark in memory of his son, William Starke Denmark. 

A gift of $25,000 from the city of Athens (1908) for the develop- 
ment of the greater campus. 

A gift of $40,000 from the Peabody Fund, for the erection of a 
building, to be known as the "George Peabody Hall," for the School 
of Education. 

A gift of $12,500 from the Phelps-Stokes Fund, for the permanent 
endowment of a Fellowship. 

A gift of $500 by Dr. M. M. Hull for the establishment of the 
A. L. Hull Scholarship. 

A gift of $600 by Mr. Preston Arkwright ('90) for the same 
purpose and under the same conditions as those of the Charles 
McDonald Brown Fund. 

A gift of $1,000 by the family of Mr. Bert Michael (1912) for 
the establishment of a scholarship in the Junior class. 

A gift of $500 by Messrs. Eugene Dodd ('93) and Harry Dodd 
('97) for the same purpose and under the same conditions as those 
of the Charles McDonald Brown Fund. 

A gift of $5,200 by Justice Joseph Henry Lumpkin ('75) for the 
establishment of the Joseph Henry Lumpkin Scholarship Ftind, for 
the same purpose and under the same conditions as those of the 
Charles McDonald Brown Fund. 

A gift by the Hon. Charles H. Brand of an annual scholarship of 
$150 during his life, with provision for its perpetuity. 

A gift by Mr. F. A. Lipscomb of an annual scholarship of $200. 
with provision for its perpetuity, in honor of his father, who was 
Professor in the University from 1869 until his death in 1873. 



GOVERNMENT 

By act of the General Assembly, approved August 23, 1889, the 
government of the University is vested in a Board of Trustees, 
appointed by the Governor for a term of eight years, and confirmed 
by the Senate. The Board consists of one member from each Con- 
gressional District of the State, four from the State at large, and 
two from the city of Athens; and the following are ex-officio mem- 
bers: the Governor of Georgia, the Chairman of the Board of Trus- 
tees of the North Georgia Agricultural College, the Chairman of the 
Board of Trustees of the School of Technology, the President of the 
Board of Directors of the Georgia Normal and Industrial College, the 
President of the Commissioners of the Industrial College for Colored 



8 UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

Youths, the Chairman of the Board of Trustees of the College of 
Agriculture, the Chairman of the Board of Trustees of the State 
Normal School, the President of the Board of Directors of the 
Medical College, the President of the Board of Trustees of the South 
Georgia Normal College. 

The immediate control and management of each of the depart- 
ments of the University situated elsewhere than at Athens is en- 
trusted (subject to general control by the University Trustees) to 
a "Local Board" or "Commission," of which the number of members, 
mode of appointment, and terms of office vary. 

The University Trustees meet in stated session on the Thursday 
preceding the Commencement Sunday, and at other times at their 
plea-sure. 



The present organization of the Board is as follows: 

HIS EXCELLENCY GOV. HUGH M. DORSEY, Atlanta, 
Ex-officio. 

GEORGE F. GOBER, Marietta, 

From the State at Large Term expires Aug. 13, 192 3. 

HENRY D. McDANIEL, Monroe, 

From the State at Large Term expires Aug. 13, 1925. 

WILLIAM E. SIMMONS, Lawrenceville, 

From the State at Large Term expires Aug. 13, 1919. 

HAMILTON McWHORTER, Athens, 

From the State at Large Term expires Aug. 13, 1921. 

SAMUEL B. ADAMS, Savannah, 

1st Congressional District Term expires Aug. 13, 1921. 

BYRON B. BOWER, Bainbridge, 

2nd Congressional District Term expires Aug. 13, 1921. 

J. E. HAYS, Montezuma, 

3rd Congressional District Term expires Aug. 13, 1921. 

HENRY R. GOETCHIUS, Columbus, 

4th Congressional District Term expires Aug. 13, 1919. 

CLARK HOWELL, Atlanta, 

5th Congressional District Term expires Aug. 13, 1919. 

LOYD CLEVELAND, Griffin, 

6th Congressional District Term expires Aug. 13, 1919. 

JOSEPH M. BROWN, Marietta, 

7th Congressional District Term expires Aug. 13, 1925. 

ANDREW J. COBB, Athens, 

8th Congressional District Term expires Aug. 13, 1919. 



UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 



Term expires Aug. 13, 1923. 
Term expires Aug. 13, 1923. 
Term expires Aug. 13, 192 3. 
Term expires Aug. 13, 1919. 
Term expires Aug. 13, 1923. 
Term expires Aug. 23, 19 25. 



HOWARD THOMPSON, Gainesville, 

9th Congressional District 
BOWDRE PHINIZY, Augusta, 
10th Congressional District 

JOHN W. BENNETT, Waycross, 
11th Congressional District 

DUDLEY M. HUGHES, Danville, 
12th Congressional District 

HUGH J. ROWE, Athens, 
Resident Trustee 

HARRY HODGSON, Athens, 

Resident Trustee 
GEORGE FOSTER PEABODY, New York, Life Trustee, 

By special act of the General Assembly. 
NATHANIEL E. HARRIS, Macon, 

Chairman of the Board of Trustees of the School of Technology, 

Ex-officio. 

THEODORE E. ATKINSON, Newnan, 

President of the Board of Directors of the Georgia Normal and 
Industrial College. Ex-officio. 

PETER W. MELDRIM, Savannah, 

President of the Board of Commissioners of the Industrial 
College for Colored Youths. Ex-officio. 

W. B. McCANTS, Winder, 

President of the Board of Trustees of the North Georgia Agri- 
cultural College. Ex-officio. 

B. S. MILLER, Columbus, 

Chairman of the Board of Trustees of the State Normal School. 
Ex-officio. 

JAMES J. CONNER, Cartersville, 

Chairman of the Board of Trustees of the College of Agricul- 
ture. Ex-officio. 

ENOCH H. CALLAWAY, Augusta, 

President of the Board of Directors of the Medical College. 
Ex-officio. 

WILLIAM E. THOMAS, Valdosta, 

President of the Board of Trustees of the South Georgia Normal 

College. Ex-officio. 

HENRY D. McDANIEL Chairman 

THOMAS W. REED Secretary and Treasurer 

PRUDENTIAL COMMITEE — 

Messrs. McWhorter, Hodgson, Rowe, Cobb. 



10 UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

FINANCE COMMITTEE — 

Messrs. Simmons, Rowe, Bower, Brown, Hayes. 
COMMITTEE ON HONORARY DEGREES — 

Messrs. Adams, Conner, and the Chancellor. 

COMMITTTEE ON BROWN FUND — 

Messrs. McWhorter, Brown, Bennett, Thompson, Cleveland. 

PROPERTY COMMITTEE — 

Messrs. Gober, Hodgson, Cleveland, Phinizy, Atkinson. 
INSURANCE COMMITTEE — 

Messrs. Simmons, McWhorter, Cobb. 

LIBRARY COMMITTEE — 

Messrs. Cleveland, Miller, Hodgson, McCants, Thomas. 



UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 11 

THE UNIVERSITY AT ATHENS 



I. Franklin College. The College of Arts). Chartered 178a, 

offering the Degree of Bachelor of Arts, and including: 

1. General Courses in the Liberal Arts. 

2. Special Courses. 

II. The Georgia State College of Agriculture and the Mechanic Arts. 

Offering the Degree of Bachelor of Science, and including the 
following: 

(a) In the College of Science and Engineering: 

1. The General Science Course. 

2. The Civil Engineering Course. 

3. The Electrical Engineering Course. 

(b) In the College of Agriculture: 

4. The Full Agricultural Course. 

5. The Forest Engineering Course. 

6. The Veterinary Medicine Course. 

7. The Course in Home Economics. 

8. The One-Year Agricultural Course. 

9. The Winter Course in Agriculture. 

10. The Experiment Station (at Experiment). 

11. The Farmers' Institutes, and Extension Service. 

III. The School of Education. — Offering the Degree of Bachelor of 
Education. 

IV. The School of Commerce. — Offering the Degree of Bachelor of 

Science in Commerce. 

V. The Graduate School. — Offering the following Degrees: 

1. Master of Arts. 

2. Master of Science. 

3. Civil Engineer. 

VI. The Law Department. — Offering the Degree of Bachelor of 

Laws. A three years' course. 

VII. The School of Pharmacy. — Offering the Degree of Graduate 
in Pharmacy. A two years' course. 

VIII. The University Summer School. 

Five Weeks' Session, offering a diploma of graduation and 
courses in 

1. Common School Branches. 

2. Pedagogy and Related Subjects. 

3. High School Studies. 

4. Selected Studies. 

5. College Credit Courses. 

6. Graduate Courses. 



12 UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

THE UNIVERSITY FACULTY 



DAVID CRENSHAW BARROW, LL.D., Chancellor. 
JAMES BEITHOLD BERRY, B.S.F. M.S., 

Professor of Plant Pathology and Forestry. 
HOMER VAN VALKENBURGH BLACK, Ph.D., 

Associate Professor of Chemistry. 
WILLIS HENRY BOCOCK, A.M., LL.D., 

Dean of the Graduate School, and MilLedge Professor of Ancient 
Languages. 
WALTER CLINTON BURKHART, D.V.M., 

Junior Professor of Veterinary Medicine. 
ROBERT PRESTON BROOKS, Ph.D., 

DeRenne Professor of Georgia History. 
DUNCAN BURNET, 

Librarian. 
WILLIAM MILLS BURSON, D.V.M., 

Professor of Veterinary Medicine. 
HORACE W. CALDWELL, B.S.A., D.V.M., 

Junior Professor of Veterinary Medicine. 
JAMES WILLIAM CANTRELL, A.B., 

Special Instructor in Physics. 
ANDREW JACKSON COBB, A.B., B.L., 

Lecturer on Constitutional Law and Legal Procedure. 
WILLIAM OLIN COLLINS, B.S.A., 

Instructor in Agricultural Chemistry. 
WALTER GROVER CORNETT, LL.B., 

Adjunct Professor of Law. 
GEORGE ARTHUR CRABB, B.S.A., 

Junior Professor of Agronomy, in charge of Soils. 
MARY E. CRESWELL, 

Director of Home Economics. 
♦WILLIAM ALEXANDER CUNNINGHAM, B.L., 

Instructor in Physical Education. . 
URIAH HARROLD DAVENPORT, B.S., 

Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering. 
♦WILLIAM S. DILTS, B.S., 

Instructor in Poultry Husbandry. 
HOWARD DOUGLAS DOZIER, A.M,. 

Associate Professor of Economics. 
♦AUSTIN SOUTHWICK EDWARDS, Ph.D., 

Associate Professor of Psychology. 



♦ In the Government service. 



UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 13 

JOHN RICHARD FAIN, B.S., 

Professor of Agronomy. 
WESLEY CRITZ GEORGE, Ph.D.. 

Adjunct Professor of Zoology. 
L. HENRY GORK. Captain Infantry, U. S. A., 

Assistant Professor of Military Science and Tactics. 
ERNEST LEE GRIGGS, (Graduate V. M. I.) 

Associate Professor of Civil Engineering and Drawing. 
LEROY COLLIER HART. B.S.E.E., A.E., 

Professor of Agricultural Engineering. 
HARLOW WILLIAMSON HARVEY, B.S.A., 

Junior Professor of Horticulture. 
CORNELIUS JACOB HEATWOLE, A.M., 

Professor of Education. 
LINVILLE LAURENTINE HENDREN, Ph.D.. 

Professor of Physics and Astronomy. 
WILLIAM DAVIS HOOPER, A.M.. 

Professor of Latin. 
HOWELL ARTHUR INGHRAM, B.S.C.. 

Instructor in Accounting. 
MILTON PRESTON JARNAGIN, B.S.A.. 

Professor of Animal Husbandry. 
JOSEPH LUSTRAT, Bach, es Lett.. 

Professor of Romance Languages. 
THOMAS HUBBARD McHATTON. D.Sc.. 

Professor of Horticulture. 
JOHN HANSON THOMAS McPHERSON. Ph.D.. 

Professor of History and Political Science. 
ROBERT LIGON McWhorter, A.M., 

Adjunct Professor of Latin and Greek. 
HENRY TOWNS MADDUX, A.B., B.S.A.. 

Editor, College of Agriculture. 
ROBERT D. MALTBY. B.S., 

State Supervisor of Vocational Agriculture. 
JOHN MORRIS, A.M., 

Professor of Germanic Languages. 
SYLVANUS MORRIS, B.L.. LL.D., 

Dean of the Law Department, and Professor of Law 
ROBERT EMORY PARK. A.M., Litt.D.. 

Professor of English. 
WILLIAM OSCAR PAYNE, A.M.. 

Associate Professor of History and Political Science. 
♦EARL EWART PEACOCK, M.B.A., 

Instructor in Accounting and Industry. 



* In the Government service. 



14 UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

ERNA E. PROCTOR, 

Junior Professor of Foods and Cookery. 
ROBERT SPENCER POND, Ph.D., 

Adjunct Professor of Mathematics. 
RAFAEL W. RAMIREZ, A.B., 

Adjunct Professor of Romance Languages. 
LOY EDMUND RAST, B.S., 

Junior Professor of Agronomy, in charge of Cotton Industry 
ROSALIE V. RATHBONE, B.S., 

Junior Professor of Textiles and Clothing. 
JOHN MOORE READE, Ph.D., 

Professor of Botany. 
THOMAS WALTER REED, A.M., 

Registrar. 
SANFORD MYRICK SALYER, A.M., 

Associate Professor of English. 
STEADMAN VINCENT SANFORD, A.B., Litt.D., 

Professor of English Language. 
JULIUS EUGENE SEVERIN, D.V.M., 

Junior Professor of Veterinary Medicine. 
LAFAYETTE MILES SHEFFER, B.S., 

Junior Professor of Agricultural Education. 
MAUDE SMITH, 

Instructor in Poultry Husbandry. 
CHARLES MERCER SNELLING, A.M., Sc.D., 

President of Franklin College. Dean of the University, and 
Professor of Mathematics. 
ANDREW McNAIRN SOULE, D.Sc, LL.D., 

President of the College of Agriculture and the Mechanic Arts, 
and Dean of the College of Agriculture. 
ROBERT POWELL STEPHENS, Ph.D., 

Assistant Professor of Mathematics. 
JOSEPH SPENCER STEWART, Ped.D., 

Professor of Secondary Education. 
CHARLES MORTON STRAHAN, C. and M.E., Sc.D., 

Professor of Civil Engineering. 
CHARLES BERT GORTON SWETLAND, Ph.G., 

Instructor in Chemistry. 
MILTON BOYCE THWEATT, Captain Infantry, U. S. A.. 

Professor of Military Science and Tactics. 
STEPHEN C. UPSON, LL.B., 

Adjunct Professor of Law. 
*ROOSEVELT PRUYN WALKER, M.A., 

Adjunct Professor of English. 



* In the Government service. 



UNIVERSITY OP' GEORGIA 15 

EARLE GEORGE WELCH, B.S.A.E., 

Junior Professor of Agricultural Engineering. 
JOHN TAYLOR WHEELER, B.S., 

Professor of Agricultural Education. 
HENRY CLAY W T HITE, Ph.D., Sc.D., D.C.L., LL.D., 

Professor of Chemistry, and Terrell Professor of Agricultural 

Chemistry. 
CECIL NORTON WILDER, B.S.A., 

Instructor in Agricultural Chemistry. 
♦GEORGE LIVINGSTON WILLIAMS, A.M., 

Adjunct Professor of Finance. 
ROBERT GUMMING WILSON, Ph.G., 

Professor of Pharmacy. 
JAMES HERBERT W T OOD, B.S.A., 

Adjunct Professor of Poultry Husbandry. 
THOMAS JACKSON WOOFTER, A.M., Ph.D., 

Dean of the School of Education, Professor of Philosophy and 
Education. 
WILLIAM ARCHER WORSHAM, JR., A.M., 

Professor of Agricultural Chemistry. 
WILLIAM THOMAS WRIGHT, M.S., 

Adjunct Professor of Physics. 
T. GEORGE YAXIS, B,S., M.S.A., 

Junior Professor of Animal Husbandry. 



THOMAS SCOTT HOLLAND, A.B., 
Tutor in Romance Languages. 



DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURAL EXTENSION 

♦WILLIAM H. ALLEN, B.S., Field Agent in Poultry Clubs. 

fMRS. EDITH M. ANDREWS, District Supervisor of Home Eco- 
nomics. 

THOMAS L. ASBURY, B.S.A.. District Supervisor of County Agents. 

ROBERT E. BLACKBURN, B.S.A., 
Field Agent in Horticulture. 

LAURA BLACKSHEAR, Illustrator. 

tBESSIE BOGGESS, Assistant State Supervisor of Home Economics. 

tMRS. E. G. BOND, District Supervisor of Home Economics. 

fESTELLE BOZEMAN, District Supervisor of Home Economics. 

tNEWTON C. BRACKETT, B.S.A.. Specialist in Smut Eradication. 

WILLIAM BRADFORD, A.B., M.D., Assistant State Supervisor of 
Agricultural Clubs. 



♦ In the Government service. 

t In cooperation with the U. S. Department of Agriculture. 



16 UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

tEARL S. BRASHIER, D.V.M., Hog Cholera Specialist. 

WILLIAM E. BROACH, B.S.A., Field Agent in Agricultural En- 
gineering. '• 

fHARRY LOWRANCE BROWN, B.S.A., Scientific Assistant in Ani- 
mal Husbandry. 

tWALTER S. BROWN, B.S.A., District Supervisor of County Agents. 

tCHARLES S. BRYANT, B.S.A., District Supervisor of County 
Agents. 

fAMES PHILANDER CAMPBELLL, B.S.A., Director of Extension. 

LEONIDAS MYERS CARTER, B.S., Junior Professor of Soil Chem- 
istry. 

tROSS RENFROE CHILDS, B.S.A., M.S. A., Scientific Assistant in 
Agronomy. 

tWILLIAM J. CLARKE, Extension Sheep Specialist. 

t GEORGIA CREWS, District Supervisor of Home Economics. 

t GEORGE VIVIAN CUNNINGHAM, Assistant State Supervisor &t 
County Agents. 

L. VINCENT DAVIS, B.S.A., Field Agent in Agronomy. 

tLOIS PAULINE DOWDLE, Assistant State Supervisor of Home 
Economics. 

t JAMES ELKANAH DOWNING, Assistant State Supervisor of Pig 
Clubs. 

tHARRISON B. EMERSON, B.S.A., Field Agent in Beef Cattle. 

JOHN WILLIAM FIROR, B.S., Junior Professor of Horticulture. 

fMILTON CLEVELAND GAY, B.S.A., Field Agent in Marketing. 

tJOHN KYRGESS GILES, B.S.A., State Supervisor of Agricultural 
Clubs. 

tROSS McKINNEY GRIDLEY, B.S.A., Field Agent in Animal Hus- 
bandry. 

tRAY C. HARRIS, B.S.A., Field Agent in Farm Drainage. 

t ROBERT P. HOWARD, B.S.A., District Supervisor of County 
Agents. 

♦WILLIAM HARVEY HOWELL, B.S.A., Extension Dairy Husband- 
man. 

fDeF. HUNGERFORD, Scientific Assistant in Farm Management. 

f JAMES A. JOHNSON, B.S.A., District Supervisor of County Agents. 

tGUY RUDOLPH JONES, B.S.A., Field Agent in Agricultural En- 
gineering. 

tCHARLES E. KELLOGG, B.S., M.S. A., Assistant Field Agent in 
Beef Cattle. 

tKATIE D. LANIER, District Supervisor of Home Economics. 

DAVID D. LONG, B.S.A., Soil Expert in State Survey. 



t In cooperation with the U. S. Department of Agriculture . 
MARION WAYNE LOWRY, B.S.A., M.A., Junior Professor of Soil 
Chemistry. 



UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 17 

+ LEO H. MARLETT, B.S.A., Field Agent in Cheese Factories. 

CHARLES A. MARTIN, B.S.A.. Field Agent in Animal Husbandry. 

MRS. LEILA R. MIZE, District Supervisor of Home Economics. 

t SAMUEL E. McCLENDON, Field Agent in Horticulture. 

EVA L. McGEE, Field Agent in Dairying. 

fWALKER R. NISBET, B.S., Assistant Field Agent in Beef Cattle. 

tJAMES G. OLIVER, Assistant State Supervisor of County Agents. 

tJAMES VERNON PHILLIPS, B.S., Senior Drainage Engineer. 

fCHARLES A. PYLE, D.V.M., Field Veterinarian. 

tELMO RAGSDALE, B.S.A., District Supervisor of County Agents. 

tGERALD ROSCOE SKINNER, B.S.A., Scientific Assistant in Dairy 
Husbandry. 

WILLIAM ALEXANDER SMITH. Field Agent in Bee Husbandry. 

tSILAS HENRY STARR, B.S.A., Junior Professor of Farm Manage- 
ment. 

tE. R. STRAHAN, B.S.A., District Supervisor of County Agents. 

PAUL TABOR, B.S.A., Field Agent in Agronomy. 

tCARL WALLACE, Extension Service Husbandman. 

FRANK WARD, B.S.A., Field Agent in Cotton Industry. 

*EDISON COLLINS WESTBROOK, B.S.A., Field Agent in Agron- 
omy. 

tROBERT FRED WHELCHEL, B.S.A., Supervisor of Extension 
Schools. 

tMRS. HOYLE S. WILSON, District Supervisor of Home Economics. 

tMRS. BESSIE STANLEY WOODS, Assistant State Supervisor of 
Home Economics. 

tLOUIS A. ZIMM, B.S.. M.F., Extension Forester. 

Student Assistants 
JOHN WILLIAM ABNEY, Commerce. 
THOMAS MEINTZER NEIBLING. Civil Engineering. 
SHAN CHUAN WANG, Botany. 

Library Start" 

ANNIE CARLTON, Reference Librarian. 
ETHEL K. MILLER, Cataloguer. 

— , Assistant. 

WALLACE P. ZACHRY, Student Assistant. 
ROBERT D. O'CALLAGHAN, Student Assistant. 
J. GASTON GAY, Student Assistant. 
CHARLES SANFORD, Student Assistant. 



* In the Government service. 

+ In cooperation with the U. S. Department of Agriculture. 



18 UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

Other Officers 

SARA COBB BAXTER, Secretary to the Chancellor. 

JULIUS TOWNSEND DUDLEY, Secretary to the President of Frank- 
lin College. 

ETHEL REESE, Secretary to the President of the College of Agri- 
culture and the Mechanic Arts. 

NELLE M. REESE, Librarian, College of Agriculture. 

PHARES OBADIAH VANATTER, Superintendent of Field Experi- 
ments. 

AMBROSE PENN WINSTON, Foreman of the College Farm. 

CHARLES B. SWEET, Superintendent of College Greenhouse and 
Grounds. 

S. R. KIRK, Foreman of Forge Shop. 






UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 19 

FACULTY COMMITTEES, 1919-1920 



Absences: Park, Salyer, McWhorter, Dozier, Thweatt. 

Alumni Bulletin: Strahan, S. Morris, McWhorter. 

Alumni Catalogue: Reed, Stewart, Payne, Worsham. 

Alumni Position: Woofter, Park, Stewart, Jarnagin. 

Athletics: J. Morris, Jarnagin, Hendren, Worsham. 

Bulletin: Brooks, Sanford, Maddux, Worsham. 

Chapter Houses and Dormitories : Park, Strahan, Lustrat, Snelling. 

Courses as Given: Snelling, Soule, Hendren. 

Curriculum: McPherson, Hooper, Bocock, White, Snelling, Woof- 
ter, Soule, J. Morris, Fain, Hendren, Creswell. 

Delinquent Students: Snelling, Soule, Bocock, Park, Strahan, J. 
Morris, Fain, Payne. 

Entrance Examinations and Accredited Schools: Hooper, Stewart, 
Fain, Stephens. 

Extension: Soule, Stewart, J. Phil Campbell, Hendren. 

Forms and Ceremonies: S. Morris, McHatton, Sanford. 

Graduate Courses: Bocock, Fain, Park, Lustrat, Snelling, Soule, 
McPherson. 

Grounds and Buildings: Griggs, McHatton. 

Gymnasium: Sanford, Snelling, Worsham, Payne, Jarnagin. 

Items: Stewart, Reed, Maddux, Sanford, Brooks. 

Library: Burnet, Reade, Brooks, Reed. 

Medical Department: White, Jarnagin, Wilson, Lustrat, Hendren, 
Reade. 

Night Meetings: Stewart, Brooks, Sanford. 

Promotion and Publicity: Stewart, Davenport, Maddux, Reed. 

Publications: Park, Sanford, Maddux, Brooks. 

Register and Announcement: Hooper, Stewart, Wilson, Stephens, 
Maddux. 

Rhodes Scholarship: Bocock, Brooks. 

Schedule: Lustrat, Stephens, Fain, Sanford. 

Self Help: Fain, Stephens, Snelling, Park, Sanford. 

Social Life of Students: Park, W'orsham, Sanford, Snelling. 

Summer Term: Pond, Woofter, Hendren. Pain. 

Registrar: Reed. 

Secretary: Hooper. 

Faculty Chairman of Athletics: Sanford. 



20 UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

BUILDINGS AND GROUNDS 



The University Campus comprises an area of 132 acres located 
in the heart of the city of Athens. In addition to this and contiguous 
to it lies the University Farm, extending from Lumpkin Street to 
the Oconee River, comprising 830 acres. 

The buildings on the University Campus are: 

1. Old College (1801, remodeled 1908). Dormitory, accommo- 
dating fifty students. 

2. Road Laboratory (formerly Philosophical Hall, 1807). Road 
Extension Laboratory. 

3. New College (1823. rebuilt in 1832, after destruction by fire). 
Dormitory, accommodating seventy students. The first floor is occu- 
pied by the Armory and the offices of the Commandant of Cadets 

4. Demosthenian Hall (1824). The Demosthenian Literary So- 
ciety. 

5. The Chapel (1831). Used for morning prayers and also as an 
assembly hall. 

6. Phi Kappa Hall (1834). The Phi Kappa Literary Society. 

7. Moore College (1874). The Schools of Physics, Civil Engin- 
eering, and Electrical Engineering. 

8. Denmark Hall (1901). Cooperative Dining Hall, accommodat- 
ing two hundred students. 

9. Candler Hall (1901). Dormitory, accommodating eighty-four 
students. 

10. Academic Building. Remodeled (1904) by combining the 
old Library (1859) with the Ivy Building (1831). Administrative 
offices, and the Schools of Mathematics, Greek, Latin, History, Eng- 
lish, English Language. Germanic Languages, Romance Languages, 
and Law. 

12. Ten-ell Hall (1904). Built to replace "Science Hall," totally 
destroyed by fire in 1903. Named in honor of Dr. William Ter- 
rell, of Hancock County, Georgia, who, in 1854, endowed the pro- 
fessorship of Agricultural Chemistry in the University. The Schools 
of Chemistry and Pharmacy. 

13. LeConte Hall (1905). Named in honor of Dr. John LeConte, 
Professor of Physics, 1846-1855, and Dr. Joseph LeConte, Professor 
of Geology, 1852-1856. The Schools of Biology and Botany. 

14. Crawford W. Long Infirmary (1907, enlarged 1914 and 
1916). Named in honor of Dr. Crawford W. Long, of the class of 
1835, the discoverer of anesthesia. 

15. The New Agricultural Hall (1907). The State College of 
Agriculture. 

16. Farm Mechanics Laboratory (1912). 



UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 21 

17. George Peabody Hall (.1913). The School of Education. 

1 8 . Veterinary Hospital (1915). 

19. The Octagon (1916). General assembly hall. 

20. The Lumpkin Law School Building (acquired 1919). 

EQUIPMENT 

The Chemical Laboratories are in Terrell Hall. There are five main labora- 
tories with an aggregate of 278 individual desks and lockers, assigned to 
General, Organic and Physical Chemistry and Qualitative and Quanti- 
tative Analysis; three smaller laboratories for advanced work; an assay 
room; balance rooms; stock rooms; a departmental library and reading 
room, furnished with current chemical journals: four lecture rooms, (seat- 
ing capacities of 150, 80, 80 and 32) and offices of the instructors. The build- 
ing is steam-heated and the laboratories are well lighted and ventilated and 
equipped with water, gas, electricity and fume closets. A sufficient and appro- 
priate stock of apparatus and chemicals for student and demonstration uses 
is annually replenished. 

The Physical Laboratories are located in Moore College. The laboratories for 
beginners are on the first floor, and consist of two rooms, 35x35 feet each, with 
desks and tables for thirty students. The equipment of these laboratories has 
been greatly increased by the recent purchase of modern apparatus for experi- 
mental work in Mechanics. Sound. Heat, and Light. The laboratory for electri- 
cal measurements is on the first floor, and is 20x45 feet. It is supplied with 
alternating and three-phase. 60-cycle. 120-volt currents from the city mains, 
and with alternating and direct currents from dynamos and storage batteries. 
The equipment of this laboratory is modern. Two rooms, 35x35 and 20x35, 
respectively, are well filled with illustrative and experimental apparatus. Two 
large lecture rooms, with seating capacities for forty and eighty students, re- 
spectively, are situated on the second floor. All laboratories and lecture rooms 
are supplied with gas, water, and direct, alternating, and polyphase electric 
currents. 

For description of the shops and the Dynamo Laboratory, see Electrical 
Engineering Laboratories, below. 

The Civil Engineering Laboratory, in Moore College, includes a drawing 
room (50x35) accommodating sixty students, instrument room, and model room. 
Tbe stock of models, charts, diagrams, and other illustrative materials is large 
and complete: the engineering instruments are of the most approved makes, 
and include all those necessary for ordinary engineering operations; a large 
Riehle testing machine is in place for testing the strength of materials. 

Tbe Biological (Zoological) Laboratories occupy the basement and first floor 
of LeConte Hall together with a Museum oil the second floor. The lecture room 
is large and conveniently arranged, and is equipped with stereo pticon and large 
collection of slides illustrating most of the lines of work undertaken. There 
arc special laboratories for General Zoology, Anatomy. Histology. Physiology, 
and in addition a dark-room and a photographic room equipped with modern 
apparatus for micro-photography. All of these laboratories are supplied with 
the most essential appliances for the work done therein, and the equipment is 
being increased as rapidly as funds will permit. The museum, while not larg< 
has been selected with reference to the courses to be illustrated, and is of great 
service in connection with all of these courses. 

The Botanical Laboratories are on the second floor of LeConte Ball. Here 
are provided a general laboratory, well lighted, commodious, and furnished for 
the work of beginners; a laboratory for Plant Pathology and Bacteriol 
equipped with culture room, sterilizers, incubator, microtomes, and other spe- 
cial apparatus: a laboratory for Plant Physiology and Photography, which is 



22 UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

a glass house on the roof provided with special physiological apparatus an«l 
equipped for photo-micrography: an Herbarium; a lecture room, and a small 
store-room. 

The Psychological Laboratory occupies eight rooms on the first floor of 
George Peabody Hall and is equipped with the latest psychological instruments 
for qualitative and quantitative studies of such mental phenomena as the 
senses, the feelings, attention, memory, etc. Every room can be brought into 
connection with every other room by a system of electric wiring. All room* 
are supplied with alternating electric current and gas. and most of them witk 
city water and sinks. One room can be used for a photographic dark-room, 
while two others are devoted especially to research work. 

The Electrical Engineering Laboratories. The Dynamo Laboratory of the 
Electrical Engineering Department is in the basement of the Moore College 
and is equipped with a 10 H. 1\ steam engine and boiler; an 8 H. I'. gas 
engine; a 10 H. P. 220-volt. three-phase electric motor; a 7% K. W.. double 
current generator; a 5 K. W., direct current generator, all belted to a commoB 
shaft; two Thompson-Houston arc light generators; one Brust arc light gen- 
erator; one Foos "Electric Special" gasoline engine of 4 H. P. output, operating 
a o K. W. direct current generator: one 2 H. P. 110- volt, three-phase induction 
motor; one 1 H. P. 110 volt, three-phase induction motor; one 1 H. I*. gas 
engine; two small experimental dynamos: one small self-exciting alternator; 
one 15 H. P. series, constant potentials, railway motor; 12 chloride accumula- 
tors; a plug switchboard to which all laboratory and lecture desk leads are 
connected ; two lamp banks of fifty lamps each : one water cooled Prony Brake 
of 10 H. 1'. capacity ; stationary and portable ammeters, voltmeters, and watt- 
meters of various types; one tachometer and several speed counters; two D. C. 
arc lamps; one A. C. flaming arc lamp; water rheostats, resistance frames, etc. 
Three-phase 110- and 220-volt circuits from the city mains are available at 
all times. 

The workshop on the second floor contains wood and metal working lathes, 
rip and cut-saw. milling machine, grindstone, emery wheel, etc., in addition to 
a full equipment of bench and shop tools for ten men. This machinery is 
driven by a three-phase induction motor from the city mains. 

The water power plants of the Athens Railway and Electric Co.. at Mitchell's 
Bridge and Barnett Shoals, their steam turbine plant and substation in the 
city, their car barn and shop, and the general system of distribution and 
utilization are, through the courtesy of the Superintendent, available for study 
and inspection. 

The Agricultural Laboratories are fully described under the statement of 
the College of Agriculture. 

The Pharmaceutical Laboratories are in Terrell Hall, and are supplied with 
all necessary equipment for giving thorough instruction in Pharmacy. 



UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 23 



THE UNIVERSITY LIBRARY 



The University Library is housed in a handsome building, the gilt 
of Mr. George Foster Peabody. The total number of volumes is 
somewhat over forty thousand, many of the older works being of 
considerable historical and antiquarian interest. Especially may be 
mentioned volumes of early American travel, files of early Georgia 
newspapers and of early English and American periodicals. 

The library has had a varied career of over a century. It was- 
founded by a resolution of the 27th of November, 1800, ordering the 
purchase of certain books "for the use of the students when not 
engaged in their academical studies;" was the cause of an attempted 
state lottery in 180 6; had quarters in "Philosophical Hall" — now 
the Road Laboratory — during 1821-23; was largely destroyed in the 
New College fire of 1830; occupied the "Ivy Building" for the next 
thirty years, the "Old Library" for the following forty-five, until in 
19 05 the present building was completed. 

As far as funds will allow, the University library attempts to meet 
not only the needs of faculty and students in the various fields of 
instruction and special study, but to build up its collection on the 
broadest cultural basis. About 1,000 volumes are added each year, 
and the library subscribes for a representative list of nearly 200 
periodicals and papers. A number of others are received as gifts. 
The library is a depository for the publications of the United States 
Government and receives by gift the publications of numerous state 
bureaus, learned societies, etc. Its collection of pamphlets numbers 
over fifteen thousand. 

The Dewey Decimal Classification is followed, modified and ampli- 
fied in an attempt to meet modern university needs. The dictionary 
and classified subject catalogues now contain cards for all works 
added in the last ten years, and for practically all modern works 
shelved in the general library. Over fifteen thousand pamphlets are 
classified and available, having either cards, or subject references 
in the dictionary catalogue. Each year bibliographies containing 
some thousands of references to books, periodicals, and pamphlets, 
are prepared on intercollegiate, inter-society and class debates, prize 
and other essays on themes, subjects of current interest, etc. 

Hours of Opening 

Week days, 9:00 A.M. -1:50 P.M.; 3:10-6:30; 7:30-10:30 P.M. 
Sundays, 3:00-6:00 P.M. 



24 UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 



ADMISSION 



Entrance to the University may be secured by two methods: (a) 
by examination, (b) by certificate. 

Entrance by Examination 

1. Examinations are held at the University in June and September 
of each year. These are in writing, and two hours are allowed to 
ea-ch unit upon which examination is offered. Examinations will be 
offered in each of the entrance subjects as requested, according to 
a schedule, on June 10, 11, 12, and on September 15, 16, 17, 18. 
All students planning to enter by examination must arrange to be 
present upon these dates, since other dates can be arranged only 
by special action of the faculty. 

Entrance by Certificate 

2. Each applicant for entrance by certificate must remember that 
there are two things required of him. He must have had the work 
required by the University for entrance. He must present a satis- 
factory certificate to that effect. The certificate to be satisfactory 
must have the following qualities: 

a. It must be official. It must be made out and signed by the 
superintendent or principal of the school. 

b. It must be explicit. The University has adopted the uniform 
certificate of the Commission on Accredited Schools of the Associa- 
tion of Colleges and Secondary Schools of the Southern States, 
which is also uniform with that of the North Central Association. 
Diplomas need not be presented. 

3. It must be complete. Many errors occur in the copying of 
school records. Sometimes it happens that the omissions are serious 
enough to prevent a student's entrance. The applicant must remem- 
ber that the University will not credit him with anything not certi- 
fied on his certificate and he must see that the certificate is correct 
before it is sent for credit. Blank certificates are sent to all the 
Georgia Accredited High Schools in time to have the certificates 
filled out before the close of school. This is the time for the grad- 
uate to see that his certificate is on file in the school office. 

d. Certificates will not be accepted which cover less than one 
year's attendance in the school issuing the certificate. Before cer- 
tifying to the work done in his school, the principal should satisfy 
himself of the previous high school training of the pupil, if a part 
was done in another school. Subjects in which an examination has 
been passed for admission to the school, or for which regular cer- 
tificates from recognized schools were received, may be included in 



UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 25 

the certificate, provided the official records from such school or of 
the examinations are given. Work done in the grammar grades or 
high school reviews of such work cannot count as units of high 
school training. 

By the end of March of each year notice will be sent to the prin- 
cipal showing the college standing of all students who are admit- 
ted by certificate to the colleges which have adopted the University 
system. 

e. The certificate should be mailed directly to the University of 
Georgia, care of the Entrance Committee, by the school official 
authorized to sign it. 

f. It must come from an approved source as indicated below. 

Classes of certificates accepted for entrance to 

a degree course 

3. The following certificates will be accepted at their face value to 
be estimated in standard unit terms, toward entrance to degree 
courses, and no others will be honored except as provided in later 
paragraphs: 

a. High School Certificates. In Georgia, a certificate which shows 
that the candidate is a graduate of a secondary school which has 
been fully accredited by the University upon the recommendation of 
the Professor of Secondary Education. Graduates of partially ac- 
credited (three-year) schools cannot receive more than twelve units 
credit on certificate. In New York, a Regent's certificate. In 
other states, a certificate from a school that has been accredited 
by the Southern Commission or the North Central Association 
or from a school which has been accredited by the state university 
of the particular state. An applicant presenting a certificate from 
a school outside the state and no ton the Southern or North Central 
lists must supply the Entrance Committee with official evidence that 
the school is entitled to the certificate privilege at the state univer- 
sity of the state in which the school is located. 

b. Certificates from preparatory schools recognized as above and 
from normal schools of approved standing. 

c. Certificates from College Entrance Examining Boards, such ae 
that of the Middle States and Maryland. 

Exceptions in Special Cases 

4. In the School of Pharmacy, from any high school, showing two 
years of work the certificate will be accepted at its face value to- 
wards admission to this School only. 

In the case of a student who has completed at some other college 
a full year of collegiate work, the Entrance Committee will honor 
a high school certificate through that college, even though it is not 
from an accredited school, if it meets the University standards. 



26 UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

CONDITIONS 

5. Entrance conditions in Greek, French, Spanish, and German 
may be made up in the University in classes provided for that pur- 
pose, provided the applicant submits fourteen units for entrance. No 
other conditions are provided for. The University maintains h© 
preparatory department. Applicants should not come to the Uni- 
versity in September expecting to prepare for entrance. 

UNITS 

6. The requirements for admission are stated in terms of units. 
A unit represents a year's study in any subject in a secondary 

school, constituting approximately a quarter of a full year's work. 
This statement is designed to afford a standard of measurement for 
work done in secondary schools. It takes the four-year high school 
course as a basis and assumes that the length of the school year 
will be approximately thirty-six weeks, that a period is at least forty 
minutes, and that the study is pursued for four or five periods a 
week; but, under ordinary circumstances, a satisfactory year's work 
in any subject cannot be accomplished in less than one hundred 
and twenty sixty-minute hours, or their equivalent. Schools organ- 
ized on a different basis can, nevertheless, estimate their work in 
terms of this unit. Less than forty minutes for recitations will re- 
duce the unit value. The subject may cover more than one year 
according to the pleasure of the teacher in arranging courses. The 
time element counts on the certificate as well as the quantity of 
work. As a general rule, four units a year is as much as the aver- 
age pupil can prepare adequately. Two hours in manual training 
or other laboratory or industrial work are equivalent to one hour 
in the class room. 

Units Recognized by the University 

7. Each subject named below is valued at a specific number of 
units if the proper time has been devoted to its preparation, but 
its value cannot rise above that number of units although additional 
time may have been given to it. 

English 1, 2, 3, or 4 units 

American History or American History and Civil Government 1 unit 
Ancient History (Greek and Roman) and Medieval History 

to 814 A. D 1 unit 

Medieval and Modern History from 814 A.D. to the present 1 unit 

(For the present, General History may be counted as 

a unit, but not in addition to Ancient or Medieval and 

Modern History). 

English History 1 unit 

Algebra (to quadratics) 1 unit 

Algebra (quadratics and beyond) *£ or 1 unit 

Geometry (Plane) 1 unit 

Geometry (Solid) *£ unit 



UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 27 

Trigonometry V2 unit 

Latin 1, 2, 3, or 4 units 

Greek 1, 2 or 3 units 

German 1 or 2 units 

French 1 or 2 units 

Spanish 1 or 2 units 

(Not less than one unit of any foreign language will be accepted). 

General Science 1 unit 

Physics x /z or 1 unit 

Chemistry 1 unit 

Physical Geography % or 1 unit 

Zoology i£ or 1 unit 

Botany % or 1 unit 

Physical Geography y 2 or 1 unit 

7 "\ 1( zv I ^ or *-k e present any two of these may be 

Botariv S counted together as 1 unit 

Biology 1 unit 

Agriculture 1 to 3 units 

Free-hand Drawing ^ The Entrance Committee may, after 
Manual Training investigating each claim, grant a 

Commercial Subjects ) total credit not exceeding 3 units 



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UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 29 

ENTRANCE AVITH ADVANCED STANDING 

8. Students entering from another college or university must pre- 
sent (1) a letter of honorable dismissal; (2) an official and full 
statement of the ccollege work already accomplished, accompanying 
the same with a marked catalogue of the institution in which it was 
done; (3) an official certificate satisfying the entrance requirements 
of the college or department of the University which the student 
may wish to enter. The Entrance Committee can not take the fact 
that a student was admitted to some other college as sufficient 
ground for admitting him to courses here. In asking for his college 
record, therefore, he should also ask for a copy of his entrance units. 

9. In case credit is desired in drawing, etc., plates and drawings 
must be submitted before the amount of credit can be determined. 

10. Such advanced students must enter the University not later 
than the beginning of the Senior year. In determining their posi- 
tion in the University, however, the value of the work done at such 
college as well as the work offered for entrance at that college, will 
be measured by University standards. 

11. Work from academies or other secondary schools will not be 
acceepted beyond the beginning of the Freshman class without exam- 
ination. Drawings, laboratory note-books, etc., where a necessary 
part of the school work for advanced credit, must also be submitted. 
When the school is officially accredited for one or two years of Junior 
college work certificates will be accepted. 

12. Work offered in fulfillment of the entrance requirements may 
not be counted for advanced standing. A student admitted to ad- 
vanced standing with a low record at previous institutions or who 
fails to maintain his advanced work may be required to repeat a 
course in the discretion of the professor. 

SPECIAL STUDENTS 

13. Sometimes a person of mature years, not a candidate for a de- 
gree, but with a definite aim or for purposes of general culture, de- 
sires to take a course in the University without meeting the full en- 
trance requirements. Such special students may be admitted under 
the following conditions: (a) they must be not less than twenty years 
of age; (b) they must give evidence of adequate preparation for 
the courses sought, to the individual professors in charge; (c) their 
names are printed separately in the catalogue. Students not less 
than eighteen years of age may be accepted as special students in 
the School of Forestry, upon the recommendation of the professor 
in charge. 

14. An application for admission as a special student should be ad- 
dressed to the Entrance Committee. It should state (1) the appli- 
cant's age, (2) his preparation. (3) a brief outline of the course or 



3© UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

courses he wishes to pursue, (4) and the consent of the departments 
in which he wishes to register. 

15. Should a student admitted as a special student become a can- 
didate for a degree, he will be required to satisfy the full fourteen 
units of entrance requirement. 

SHORT COURSES 

16. Students taking the short courses in Agriculture, Horticul- 
ture, and Dairying are exempt from the entrance requirements. 

These courses include the one-year Agricultural course, the short 
Cotton School course, and similar courses, that may be offered from 
time to time. 

ADMISSION TO THE GRADUATE SCHOOL 

17. Admission to the Graduate School is granted to graduates of 
colleges of good standing. Other persons of suitable age and attain- 
ments may also be admitted by special permission of the Committee 
on Graduate Courses. Admission to the Graduate School does not 
imply admission to candidacy for a degree. Application for admis- 
sion should be made by correspondence or at the office of the Dean. 

A student who is any wise doubtful as to his eligibility for admis- 
sion to the Graduate School, previous to his coming to Athens, should 
correspond with the Dean of the Graduate School. Full details 
should be forwarded of the candidate's previous course of study, in- 
cluding a catalogue of the institution in which the under-graduate 
work was done. 

METHODS OF ENTRANCE 

18. Note. All applicants must have been successfully vaccinated 
or must be vaccinated before they register. 

19. Entrance Following Examination. Those who plan to enter 
by examination will receive entrance cards from the Entrance Com- 
mittee in the Faculty Room, Academic Building, as soon they have 
made the necessary units. 

20. Entrance in Advance. Applicants planning to enter by cer- 
tificate will be saved much trouble and annoyance and possibly delay 
by having their certificates mailed by the principal of the school in 
advance to the Entrance Committee as soon as they have decided 
to make application. All preliminary adjustments can be made by 
correspondence, at the close of which the successful applicant will 
need merely to present his entrance card to the Dean of the College 
or department in which he wishes to enroll. 

21. Entrance on Registration Days. All new students, whether 
they have filed certificates or wish to take the examinations, will 
report to the Entrance Committee in the Faculty Room, Academic 
Building. As soon as the entrance requirements are met, entrance 



UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 31 

eards will be issued, which the applicant will present to the proper 
Dean for registration. Applicants are not admitted on "probation" 
or "trial," or on "the promise of certificates later," or on "diplomas" 
or general "letters of commendation." They must stand the exam- 
inations or submit the official certificates. Applicants from a dis- 
tance should, before coming to the University, await assurance that 
their credentials will be accepted and are sufficient for admission. 

DEFINITIONS OF ENTRANCE UNITS 

2 2. The following information is published for the benefit of 
school officers, high school teachers and others who desire informa- 
tion regarding the character and extent of work which should con- 
stitute the units that are accepted for admission to the University of 
Georgia. The definitions of units are those that have been recom- 
mended by he Commission on Accredited Schools of the Southern 
States and the North Central Association of Colleges and Secondary 
Schools, and approved by the University, which is a member of the 
Southern Association. These definitions are published for the pur- 
pose of being helpful and suggestive rather than with the object 
of restricting the work of secondary teachers in any undesirable 
manner. 

ENGLISH 

(3 units, but may be rated at 4 units where exceptionally good 
work is done under best conditions). 

23. Preparation in English has two main objects: (1) command 
of correct and clear English, spoken and written; (2) ability to read 
with accuracy, intelligence, and application. 

The first object requires instruction in grammar and composition. 
English grammar should be reviewed in the secondary school; and 
correct spelling and grammatical accuracy should be rigorously ex- 
acted in connection with all written work during the four years. 
The principles of English composition governing punctuation, the 
use of words, paragraphs, and the different kinds of whole composi- 
tion, including letter-writing, should be thoroughly mastered; and 
practice in composition, oral as well as written, should extend 
throughout the secondary school period. Written exercises may well 
comprise narrative, description, and easy exposition and argument 
based upon simple outlines. It is advisable that subjects for this 
work be taken from the student's personal experience, general knowl- 
edge, and studies other than English, as well as from his reading 
in literature. Finally, special instruction in language and composi- 
tion should be accompanied by concerted effort of teachers in all 
branches to cultivate in the student the habit of using good English 
in his recitations and various exercises, whether oral or written. 



32 UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

For Study, 1915-1919 

24. One book is to be selected from each of the four groups: 

I. Drama. Shakespeare's Julius Caesar, Macbeth, Hamlet. 

II. Poetry. Milton's L'Allegro, II Penseroso, and either Comus, 
or Lycidas; Tennyson's The Coming of Arthur, The Passing of Ar- 
thur, and The Holy Grail. Selections from Wordsworth, Keats, and 
Shelley. 

III. Oratory. Burke's Speech on Conciliation with America; Ma- 
caulay's Speeches on Copyright; and Lincoln's Cooper Union Speech; 
Washington's Farewell Address; Webster's Bunker Hill Oration. 

IV. Essays. Carlyle's Essay on Burns; Selection of Burns' 
Poems; Macaulay's Life of Johnson; Emerson's Essay on Manners. 

For Reading, 1918-1919 

2 5. At least two books are to be selected from each of the five 
groups, except as otherwise provided under Group I. 

I. Classics in Translation. The Old Testament, comprising at 
least the chief narrative episodes in Genesis, Exodus, Joshua, Judges, 
Samuel, Kings, and Daniel, together with the books of Ruth and 
Esther. The Odyssey, with the omission, if desired, of Books I, II, 
III, IV, V, XV, XVI, XVII, Bryant's Translation, The Iliad, with the 
omission, if desired, of Books XI, XII, XIV, XV, XVII, XXI; Bry- 
ant's Translation, complete. The Aeneid. For any selection from 
this group a selection from any other group may be substituted. 

II. Shakespeare. Midsummer Night's Dream; Merchant of Venice; 
As You Like It; Twelfth Night; The Tempest; Romeo and Juliet; 
King John; Richard II; Richard III; Henry V; Coriolanus; Julius 
Caesar, Macbeth, Hamlet, if not chosen for study. 

III. Prose Fiction. Malory's Morte d'Arthur; Bunyan's Pilgrim's 
Progress, Part I; Swift's Gulliver's Travels (voyages to Lilliput and 
to Brodbingnag) ; Defoe's Robinson Crusoe, Part I; Goldsmith's 
Vicar of Wakefield; Scott: any one novel (e. g. Ivanhoe, Quentin 
Durward). Scott's Waverly Novels; Jane Ausin: any one novel; 
Maria Edgeworth's Castle Rackrent, The Absentee; Frances Bur- 
ney's (Madame d'Arblay) Elvina; Dickens: any one novel (e. g. 
A Tale of Two Cities). Thackeray: any one novel (e. g. Henry Es- 
mond). George Eliot: any one novel (e. g. Silas Marner) ; Mrs. 
Gaskell's Cranford; Kingsley's Westward Ho! or Hereward the 
Wake; Reade's The Cloister and the Hearth; Blackmore's Lorna 
Doone; Hughes's Tom Brown's School Days; Stevenson: any one of 
the novels; Cooper: any one novel (e. g. The Spy; The Last of the 
Mohicans). Poe's Selected Tales; Hawthorne: any of the novels 
(e. g. The House of the Seven Gables; The Marble Faun). 

VI. Essays, Biographies, Etc. Addison and Steele's The Sir Roger 
de Coverly Papers, or Selections from Tatler and Spectator; Bos- 
well's Selections from the Life of Johnson; Franklin's Autobiogra- 



UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 33 

phy; Irving's Selections from the Sketch Book, or the Life of Gold- 
smith; Southey's Life of Nelson; Lamb's Selection from the Essays 
of Elia; Lockhart's Selections from the Life of Scott. Thackeray's 
Lectures on Swift, Addison, and Steele (in English Humorists). 
Macaulay: one of the following essays: Lord Clive; Warren Hast- 
ings; Milton; Addison; Goldsmith; Frederic the Great; Madame 
d'Arblay; Trevelyan's Selections from Life of Macaulay; Ruskin's 
Sesame and Lilies, or Selections; Dana's Two Years Before the Mast; 
Lincoln: Selections, including at least the two Inaugurals, the 
Speeches in Independence Hall and at Gettysburg, the Last Public 
Address, and Letter to Horace Greeley; together with a brief memoir 
or estimate of Lincoln; Parkman's The Oregon Trail; Thoreau's 
Walden; Lowell's Selected Essays; Holmes's The Autocrat of the 
Breakfast Table; Stevenson's Inland Voyage and Travels with a 
Donkey; Huxley's Autobiography and Selections from Lay Sermons, 
including the addresses on Improving Natural Knowledge, A Liberal 
Education, and A Piece of Chalk; Essays by Bacon, Lamb, De 
Quincey, Emerson, Hazlitt; A collection of letters by various stand- 
ard writers. 

V. Poetry. Selected poems by Dryden, Gray. Cowper, Burns, 
Collins. Selected Poems by Wordsworth, Keats, Shelley, if not 
chosen for study. Goldsmith's The Traveller, and The Deserted Vil- 
lage; Pope's The Rape of the Lock; A Collection of English and 
Scottish Ballads, as, for example, Robin Hood Ballads, The Battle 
of Otterburne, King Estmere, Young Beichan, Bewick and Grahame. 
Sir Patrick Spens, and a selection from later ballads; Coleridge's 
The Ancient Mariner, Christabel and Kubla Khan; Byron's Childe 
Harold, Canto III; or Childe Harold, Canto IV, and the Prisoner of 
Chillon; Scott's The Lady of the Lake, or Marmion; Macaulay's The 
Lays of Ancient Rome; The Battle of Naseby; The Armada; Ivry; 
Tennyson's The Princess; or Gareth and Lynette. Lancelot and 
Elaine, The Passing of Arthur; Browning's Cavalier Tunes, The Lost 
Leader, How They Brought the Good News from Ghent to Aix, Home 
Thoughts from Abroad, Home Thoughts from the Sea, Incident of 
the French Camp, Herve Riel, Pheidippides, My Last Duchess, Up at 
a Villa — Down in the City. The Italian in England, The Patriot. "De 
Gustibus," The Pied Piper, Instans Tyrannus. Arnold's Sohrab and 
Rustum, and The Forsaken Merman; Selections from American 
Poetry -with special attention to Poe, Lowell, Longfellow and 
Whittier. 

For the completion of the above uniform requirements in English, 
as outlined by the National Conference, three units of credit will be 
allowed; and four units will be granted to those students only who 
after at least four full years have successfully completed an addi- 
tional amount of work equal to one-third of the above requirements. 



34 UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

HISTORY 

26. a. Ancient History (1 unit). Special attention to Greek and 
Roman history, but including also a short introductory study of the 
more ancient nations and the chief events of the early middle ages 
down to the death of Charles the Great (814 A. D.) 

h. European History from the death of Charles the Great to the 
present time (1 unit). 

(J. English History (1 unit). 

e. American History and Civil Government (1 unit). The study 
of a more recent High School text in each and not a Grammar School 
History. 

General History may be counted as a unit, but not in addition to 
ancient or medieval and modern history. 

MATHEMATICS 

27. Algebra to quadratics (1 unit). 
Plane Geometry (1 unit). 

Algebra, quadratics and beyond ( % or 1 unit). 
Solid Geometry (y 2 unit). 
Plane Trigonometry (y 2 unit). 

LATIN 

2 8. Elementary Latin Book (1 unit). 

Caesar (1 unit). Any four books of the Gallic War, with study 
of the grammar and prose composition based upon the text read. 
Equivalent reading in other standard authors allowed, but not to 
exceed two books. 

Cicero. Any six orations from the following list, but preferably 
the first six mentioned: 

The four orations against Catiline, Archias, the Manilian Law, 
Marcellus, Roscius, Milo, Sestius, the fourteenth Philippic. 

Vergil. The first six books of the Aeneid. 

The equivalent of at least one period a week in prose composition 
based on Cicero. 

Note: In place of a part of Cicero, an equivalent of Sallust's 
Catiline, and in place of a part of Vergil, an equivalent of Ovid will 
be accepted for the third unit made up of reading from Cicero and 
Vergil. 

GREEK 

29. 1. Introductory Lessons: Xenophon's Anabasis (20 to 30 
pages). 

2. Xenophon's Anabasis (continued), either alone or with other 
attic prose (75 to 120 pages). Practice in reading at sight, system- 
atic study of grammar, thorough grammatical review, and practice 



UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 3 5 

in writing Greek, both based on study of Books I and II of the 
Anabasis. 

Note: The University entrance requirement for Greek is 1 % 
units: Course 1, outlined above, and three books of the Anabasis. 

Ample provision is made at the University for students whose 
preparation in Greek is deficient. These classes must be taken by 
candidates for the degree of Bachelor of Arts who have had no 
instruction in Greek (unlss German and French are to be substi- 
tuted for Greek) and by students whose preparation has been lack- 
ing in thoroughness and accuracy, before proceeding to the reg- 
ular requirements of the curriculum. Candidates for this degree 
are, therefore , urged to secure before entering college full prepara- 
tion for the regular Freshman class in Greek (Course 1). Summer 
School courses may also be taken to advantage. 

GERMAN 

30. 1. The work of the first year should aim at: (a) Correct pro- 
nunciation; (b) Thorough grounding in the elements of grammar; 

(c) A certain facility in understanding and speaking the language; 

(d) A quantum of accurate translation from German to English. 

In order to attain these ends, we recommend the following 
methods: 

(a) Constant drill in pronunciation by reading aloud in chorus 
or singly. This exercise, reinforced by the oral practice, or collo- 
quium, should never be omitted. 

(b) About fifteen lessons of a modern direct-method book, with 
daily written exercises. 

(c) Carefully worked-out colloquial lessons, following a pre- 
arranged scheme, designed to teach the vocabulary of everyday life. 
To insure spontaneity, it is recommended that no text book appear, 
but that, as far as possible, the objects be pointed out or drawn on 
the board, and careful notes be taken by the pupils under the super- 
vision of the teacher. To insure system, the teacher must follow 
either a method of his own or a method book. We recommend 
Manfred's Ein Praktischer Anfang, Methode Berlitz (Erstes Buch), 
Walter-Krause's Beginner's German, Newson's First German Book. 
The colloquium should also include memorizing of poems and sing- 
ing of songs, and should occupy at least one-third of the time of 
every lesson. 

(d) Daily written translation of a portion of the assignment for 
reading. The first year's text must be made to order, very simple, 
interesting, if possible, and must present a thoroughly practical 
vocabulary; 100 pages will suffice, though more may be read. Sug- 
gestions: Stern's Studien und Plaudereien, Guerber's Marchen und 
Erzahlungen, Allen's Herein. 



36 UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

2. The second unit's work is simply a continuation of the meth- 
ods and exercises recommended for the first year. The grammar 
should be nearly completed, and about 150 pages of short stories 
or narratives of travel in Germany should be translated in the man- 
ner above suggested. Texts recommended: L'Arrabbiata, Germels- 
hausen, Der zerbrochene Krug, Immensee, Stille Wasser, Der Besuch 
im Karzer, Holzwarth's Gruss aus Deutschland, Bacon's Im Vater- 
land, Walter-Krause's First Reader, or any standard graduated 
Reader. 

If these instructions are faithfully followed, it may be hoped 
that the candidate will possess: (a) A correct, fluent pronunciation; 
(b) a genuine knowledge of forms and a thorough grasp of the im- 
portant rules of grammar; (c) a command of a pretty wide vocab- 
ulary of reallen; and (d) a real ability, within well-defined limits, 
to understand and speak the language. 

Note: If time can be spared for the purpose, we also strongly 
recommend that the beginner be taught German script; to which end 
copy-books may be employed. 

FRENCH 

31. 1. During the first year the work should comprise: (a) Care- 
ful drill in pronunciation; (b) the rudiments of grammar, including 
the inflection of the regular and the more common irregular verbs, 
the plural of nouns, the inflection of adjectives, participles, and pro- 
nouns; the use of personal pronouns, common adverbs, prepositions, 
and conjunctions; the order of words in the sentence, and the ele- 
mentary rules of syntax; (c) abundant easy exercises, designed not 
only to fix in the memory the forms and principles of grammar, but 
also to cultivate readiness in the reproduction of natural forms of 
expression; (d) the reading of from 100 to 175 duodecimo pages of 
graduated text, with constant practice in translating into French 
easy variations of the sentences read (the teacher giving the Eng- 
lish), and in reproducing from memory sentences previously read; 
(e) writing French from dictation. 

2. During the second year the work should comprise: (a) the 
reading of from 250 to 400 pages of easy modern prose in the form 
of stories, plays, or historical or biographical sketches; (b) constant 
practice, as in the previous year, in translating into French easy 
variations upon the text read; (c) frequent abstracts, sometimes 
oral and sometimes written, of portions of the text already read; 
(d) writing French from dictation; (e) continued drill upon the 
rudiments of grammar, with constant application in the construc- 
tion of sentences; (f) mastery of the forms and use of pronouns, 
pronominal adjectives, of all but the rare irregular verb forms, and 
of the simpler uses of the conditional and subjun/itive. 



UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 3 7 

Suitable texts for the second year are: About's Le Roi des mon- 
tagnes, Bruno's Le Tour de la France, Daudet's easier short tales, 
La Bedollier's La Mere Michel et son chat, Erckmann-Chatrian's 
stories, Foa's Contes biographiques and Le Petit Robinson de Paris, 
Foncin's Le Pays de France, Labiche and Martin's La Poudre aux 
Yeux and Le Voyage de M. Perrichon, Legouve and Labiche's La 
Cigale chez les fourmis, Malot's Sans Famille, Mairet's La Tache du 
petit Pierre, Merimee's Colomba, extracts from Michelet's Sarcery's 
Le Siege de Paris, Verne's stories. 

SPANISH 

32. Work similar in amount and character to that outlined above 
for French. 

GENERAL SCIENCE (one unit) 

33. The work of this course should consist of a study of those 
natural phenomena, without respect to any one of the sub-divisions 
of natural science, which touch most directly upon the student's 
daily life and experience. It should be given in the first year and 
a half of the high school course. 

For a full unit's credit both recitation and individual laboratory 
work should be done. For the recitation work one of the modern 
text-books in General Science should be used, of type and grade of 
Clark's General Science, Eikenberry and Caldwell's General Science, 
or Snyder's First Year Science. For the laboratory work the student 
should be required to make a series of simple observations and ex- 
periments from which he can obtain answers to many of the ques- 
tions which every child puts to himself concerning the things around 
him. A careful record should be kept of all observations and ex- 
periments made, with the conclusions drawn. The laboratory man- 
ual should be of a grade suggested by the above text-books. 

PHYSICS (one unit) 

34. 1. The unit in Physics consists of at least 120 hours of as- 
signed work. Two periods of laboratory work count as one of as- 
signed work. 

2. The work consists of three closely related parts, namely, class 
work, lecture-demonstration work, and laboratory work. At least 
one-fourth of the time should be devoted to laboratory work. 

Note: Where students have the proper training in class work and 
lecture-demonstration, but cannot have access to a laboratory for 
individual experiments, a half unit will be allowed. 

CHEMISTRY (one unit) 

35. The course should consist of at least three recitations and two 
hours of laboratory work weekly throughout the year. 



38 UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

PHYSICAL GEOGRAPHY (one unit). 

3 6. The equivalent of work as presented in recent texts, with 
about forty laboratory lessons. 

BOTANY' (one unit) 

37. The course should be based on one of the modern High 
School text-books. Special emphasis should be laid on the laboratory 
work which should consist of work in both the structure and phys- 
iology of plants. 

PHYSIOLOGY (one-half unit) 

38. The course should be based on one of the modern High School 
text-ibooks. Little importance is attached to laboratory work in 
Anatomy in connection with this course, and on account of the im- 
possibility of offering any real laboratory work in Physiology in 
a High School, none is expected. The teacher should be specially 
careful to see that the student has a real understanding of the action 
of the various organs both individually and in relation to each other, 
rather than the ability to recite pages of a text. 

ZOOLOGY' (one unit, one-half unit) 

39. A study of modern text and laboratory study of ten types for 
one unit, or five types for one-half unit. The study should come best 
in the second year of the high school and should consist of two class- 
room exercises and at least two laboratory double periods. 

AGRICULTURE 

40. To receive college entrance credit, a one year's course should 
consist of three recitation periods and two double laboratory periods 
per week extending through one school year. 

Where one year's work only is offered, the course in Agriculture 
is to be a general course, covering the fundamentals of soil, plants, 
animals, farm management and rural economics. 

COMMERCIAL GEOGRAPHY (one-half unit) 

41. One-half unit devoted to a comparative study of the industry 
and commerce of the leading nations, with emphasis on the industry 
and commerce of the United States. 

MANUAL TRAINING 

4 2. 1. (a) Free Hand Drawing, y 2 to 1 unit. 

(b) Mechanical Drawing, V 2 to 1 y 2 units (conditioned upon an 
equal amount of Geometry with it). 

(c) Shopwork, y 2 to 5 V> units, approximately distributed as fol- 
lows, and the total accepted from any student being not more than 
twice the value of the Mechanical Drawing accepted from him. 
Benchwork in Wood, y 2 unit, Cabinet work 1 unit, Wood Turning 



UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 39 

y 2 unit, Pattern Making y 2 unit, Forging 1 unit, Machine work in 
Metal 1 unit, Foundry work 1 unit. The time required for each unit 
is to be not less than 240 sixty minute hours; all Shopwork, except 
Benchwork in Wood, to have periods of not less than sixty minutes 
each. 

2. The colleges accept these units for the present after special 
investigation as to the merits of the work done. 

3. The total accepted may equal one unit for A.B. Courses, or 
three units for B.S. and Engineering Courses. 

BOOKKEEPING AND BUSINESS ARITHMETIC (one unit) 

43. The minimum time for one unit should be 240 hours, of sixty 
minutes. 

No credit should be allowed unless the work is done neatly, accu- 
rately, and at a satisfactory rate of speed. All work should be done 
in the class room under the eye of the instructor. Definitions of 
double entry terms, with rules for debit and credit, kinds and uses 
of books. Conduct of a set including the journal, ca-sh book, sales 
book; closing of books. Single entry set: changing from single to 
double entry. Text-book, with exercises so arranged that no two 
students will do exactly the same work. 

STENOGRAPHY AND TYPEWRITING (one unit) 

44. Shorthand. It is recommended that a minimum of one and 
one-half years be given to the study of Shorthand. Pupils com- 
pleting the course should be able to write in shorthand prose dic- 
tated at the rate of 60 words a minute, and be able to translate the 
notes correctly on the following day. For this one and one-half units 
should be allowed. 

Typewriting. To typewriting one year should be given. If at the 
end of the year the pupil can typewrite without error forty words a 
minute, a credit of one-half a unit should be given. 

Bookkeeping. The course in bookkeeping should be the simple 
form in single and double entry bookkeeping, and should continue 
for one year, for which a credit of one unit should be given. 

Commercial or Business Arithmetic. The course should cover one 
year, for which a credit of not more than one unit should be given. 

BUSINESS LAW (one-half unit) 
4 5. Text-book supplemented by some study of cases, (by way of 
illustration), discussions and practice in drawing legal papers such 
as abstracts, notes, bill of exchange, bill of sale, bill of lading, power 
of attorney, deed, mortgage, lease, notice of protest, etc. 

LOOREDITED SCHOOLS 

The following constitute the standards with reference to which 
schools are classified: 



40 UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

46. No school shall be fully accredited which does not require for 
graduation the completion of a four-year high school course of study 
embracing fifteen units as defined by the University. More than 
twenty periods per week of prepared work should be discouraged. 

47. The minimum scholastic attainment of three-fourths of all 
secondary school teachers of academic subjects in any accredited 
school shall be equivalent to graduation from a standard college. 
It is strongly advised that this attainment include, or be supple- 
mented by, special study of the content and pedagogy of the subject 
taught. 

48. The number of daily periods of class-work instruction given 
by any teacher should not exceed six per day; and no school will be 
accredited in which more than seven full recitations per day are 
conducted by any teacher. Superintendents and principals should 
be given sufficient time to visit various grades or departments for 
the purpose of supervision. There should be at least three teachers 
devoting full time to grade work, and at least two teachers who 
devote their entire time to the high school. 

49. The school year should be at least thirty-six weeks in length 
and no school will be fully accredited in which the time is limited to 
a shorter period. 

50. The laboratory should be supplied with apparatus, tables, 
water, and other appliances necessary to enable a student to perform 
all required experiments. At least forty minutes a week should be 
devoted to individual laboratory work in each of the sciences offered 
for admission. The laboratory period should be double the length 
of the recitation period, and in physical and biological sciences in- 
cluding agriculture there should be two laboratory periods per 
week. Double periods count for one. 

51. The library should consist of carefully selected books of ref- 
erence and supplementary readings upon the various departments of 
high school work. This library should be located in the most con- 
venient place for use, and a card index prepared for the best results. 

52. The location and construction of the buildings, the lighting, 
heating, and ventilation of the rooms, the nature of the lavatories, 
corridors, water supply, school furniture, apparatus and methods of 
cleaning shall be such as to insure hygienic conditions for both 
pupils and teachers. 

53. The efficiency of instruction, the acquired habits of thought 
and speech, the general intellectual and moral tone of a school are 
paramount factors and, therefore, only schools that rank well in 
these particulars, as evidenced by rigid, thorough-going, sympathetic 
inspection, shall be considered eligible for the list. 

54. The University will decline to consider any school for full 
credit whose teaching force consists of fewer than three teachers of 



UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 41 

academic subjects giving their full time to high school instruction. 

55. No school shall be considered unless the regular annual blank 
furnished for the purpose shall have been filled out and placed on 
file with the inspector. 

56. All schools whose records show an excessive number of pupils 
per teacher, as based on the average number enrolled, even though 
they may technically meet all other requirements, will be rejected. 
The University recognizes thirty as maximum.' 

57. The time for which schools are accredited shall be for one to 
three years. In every case the character of the work done by a 
school must be the determining factor in accrediting. By personal 
visits of the inspector, by detailed reports from the principals, and 
by the records made by the students in colleges, the character of a 
school's work shall be, from time to time, determined. A school 
shall be removed from the accredited list for failure to maintain the 
above standards. 

BOARD AND LODGING 

DORMITORIES 

There are three dormitories, Old College, for Juniors and Seniors; 
New College and Candler Hall for lower classmen. 

58. Rooms in the dormitories are lighted by electricity and are 
furnished with chairs, bed, table, and washstand. The student fur- 
nishes all the other articles and his own fuel. The University gives 
dormitory quarters to students rent free. A charge of $4.00 per 
month per man is made for each room occupied to cover the expenses 
of janitors, water, and lights. This charge is payable in two install- 
ments, $14.00 at the beginning of the session, and $22.00 on Janu- 
ary 1st. A deposit fee of $2.00 is required of every student before 
assignment is made. This fee is a charge against damage to the 
property, and the balance is returned at the end of the year. 

The dormitories are in charge of a committee from the Faculty. 
The rules and regulations prescribed by this committee are enforced 
through Proctors placed over each division of the dormitories. 

Those desiring dormitory rooms should apply in person or by 
letter to Mr. T. W. Reed, Treasurer, Athens, Georgia. No assign- 
ment will be made until the required deposit fee is paid. Applica- 
tions should be made early, as only about two hundred can be 
accommodated. 

DENMARK DINING HAlii 

59. The Hall, which is in charge of a competent matron, and 
under the immediate supervision of a member of the Faculty, fur- 
nishes board on the cooperative plan to more than two hundred stu- 
dents. During the session 1918-19 the cost was $16.00 per month 



4 2 UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

Regular financial statements are rendered by the professor in charge, 
and audited by a committee of the students. No reservations are 
made in advance. The students are given seats in the order of ar- 
rival at the Hall and the payment of fees. 

EXPENSES 

60. Residents of Georgia pay no tuition fees except in the Law and 
Pharmacy courses. Students who are residents of other states are 
charged a tuition fee of $50.00 per annum in academic courses, ex- 
cept in Agriculture. A fee of $12.00 is required of all students, to 
cover infirmary (including medical attention), gymnasium, and 
student activities. The following estimate of expenses includes all 
necessary items except clothing and railroad fare: 

61. Expenses of Students when Rooming in a Dormitory and Board- 
ing at Denmark Dining Hall 

Matriculation fee (paid on entrance), except in Agriculture $ 10.00 

Library fee (paid on entrance), except in Agriculture 5.00 

Initiation fee to literary society (paid on entrance) 2.00 

Board (paid monthly, in advance, $16.00) 144.00 

Books and stationery (estimated) 10.00 

Laundry (estimated at $1.25 per month) 11.25 

Room rent, lights and attendance ($4.00 per month) 36.00 

Deposit fees in Dormitory and Dining Hall 5.00 

Fee for Infirmary, etc 12.00 



$235.25 

Engineering students must have a set of drawing instruments. 
• 6 2. A student, the first year, can scarcely meet his necessary 
expense on less than $250 for the scholastic year; usually it will 
exceed this amount. 

Note: In order to meet all the necessary expenses of registration, 
books, uniform and other expenditures incident to securing a room 
and board, a student should come prepared to expend about fifty 
or sixty dollars during the first ten days. After that period his board 
and room rent will constitute the major part of his expenses. 

63. Students in the one-year Agricultural Course, the Winter 
Course, and the full Agricultural Course are exempt from matricula- 
tion and library fees. 

The figures given above are for the first year. They are based 
upon the actual experiences of students. Expenses can be brought 
under the estimate by strict economy. Second-hand books can be 
purchased at the Cooperative Store, and elsewhere. In these and 
other ways money can be saved. 



UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 43 

SPECIAL FEES 

64. Special fees, sufficient to cover the material consumed, are 
attached to the following courses: 

Chemistry 1, 2, 3, 5, 6*, 7 $ 2.50 

Chemistry 8, 9 10.00 

Zoology 2.50 

Physical Laboratory 2.50 

Botany 1, 2. 3a, 4 2 50 

Botany 5, 6, 9 3.50 

PRIVATE BOARD AND LODGING 

65. The charges for private rooms vary with the character of the 
furnishings, from $5.00 to $12.00 a month for two occupants. This 
is a very popular way of lodging. The students board at the Den- 
mark Dining Hall, or they can secure private table board for $3.00 
to $6.00 a week. A number of families in the city offer board and 
lodging at from $15.00 to $27.50 a month. The University cannot 
agree to engage rooms in private families. A list of those desiring 
boarders or having furnished rooms to rent, will be given on appli- 
cation, but the student must make his own arrangements. 

The officers of the University Y. M. C. A. also render every assist- 
ance possible to those desiring advice and help in such matters. 
There need be no anxiety, therefore, in regard to securing accom- 
modations. 

INCIDENTAL EXPENSES 

66. The incidental expenses of a student are what he makes them, 
and parents are urged to take into their own hands the control of a 
matter which no college regulation can successfully reach. 

SCHOLARSHIPS 
Charles McDonald Brown Scholarship Fund 

67. This endowment was established in 1881, by the Hon. Joseph 
E. Brown, ex-Governor of Georgia, in memory of his son, of the class 
of 1878, for the purpose of aiding young men in defraying the 
expenses of their education. The interest on this fund is lent to 
worthy young men on condition that they obligate themselves to 
return it with four per cent interest. Young men who enter the 
ministry are required to return but one-half of the amount borrowed, 
with interest. 

The colleges participating in the benefits of this fund are: the 
colleges at Athens, (including the Law Department), the Medical 
College at Augusta, and the North Georgia Agricultural College at 
Dahlonega. 

A special circular of information concerning the fund and blank 
forms of application will be supplied on request. Applications for 



44 UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

loans from this fund must be made on these forms and must be in 
the hands of the Chancellor by April 1st. The grants are made in 
June by the Board of Trustees. Only $100.00 a year, in nine 
monthly installments, is allowed a borrowing'student. 

68. The Honor Graduate of an Accredited High School, on pre- 
sentation of an official certificate by the Principal, is awarded a 
scholarship at the University for one year in the Academic courses. 
This exempts him from the payment of matriculation fees. 

69. The Hodgson Scholarship. One hundred dollars per year for 
ten years (expiring in 1918), given by the Empire State Chemical 
Company, to be lent on the same terms as the Charles McDonald 
Brown Scholarship Fund. 

70. The Bert Michael Scholarship. Sixty dollars per year, the in- 
come of a fund given by the family of the late Bert Michael, of the 
class of 1912, to be given to a member of the Junior class, selected 
by a committee of the Faculty. 

71. The Arkwright Fund. The income of a fund given by Preston 
S. Arkwright, to be lent on the same terms as the Charles McDonald 
Brown Scholarship Fund. 

72. The Joseph Henry Lumpkin Scholarship Fund. The income 
of a fund given by Joseph Henry Lumpkin, to be lent on the same 
terms as the Charles McDonald Brown Scholarship Fund. 

7 3. The Dodd Fund. The income of a fund given by Eugene and 
Harry Dodd, to be lent on the same terms as the Charles McDonald 
Brown Scholarship Fund. 

74. The Brand Fund. The sum of $150.00 per year during the 
life of Hon. C. H. Brand, with provision for perpetuity. 

75. The Lipscomb Fund. The sum of $200.00 per year, with pro- 
vision for perpetuity. 

The Phelps-Stokes Fellowship 

76. This Fellowship has been endowed under the following resolu- 
tions of the Trustees of the Phelps-Stokes Fund: 

"Whereas, Miss Caroline Phelps-Stokes in establishing the Phelps- 
Stokes Fund was especially solicitous to assist in improving the con- 
dition of the negro, and 

"Whereas, It is the conviction of the Trustees that one of the best 
methods of forwarding this purpose is to provide means to enable 
southern youth of broad sympathies to make a scientific study of the 
negro and his adjustment to American civilization: 

"Resolved, That twelve thousand five hundred dollars ($12,500) 
be given to the University of Georgia for the permanent endowment 
of a research fellowship, on the following conditions: 

"1. The University shall appoint annually a Fellow in Sociology, 
for the study of the Negro. He shall pursue advanced studies under 



UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 45 

the direction of the Departments of Sociology, Economics. Educa- 
tion or History, as may be determined in each case by the Chancel- 
lor. The Fellowship shall yield $500, and shall, after four years, be 
restricted to graduate students. 

"2. Each Fellow shall prepare a paper or thesis embodying the 
result of his investigation, which shall be published by the Univer- 
sity with assistance from the income of the fund, any surplus re- 
maining being applicable to other objects incident to the main pur- 
pose of the Fellowship. A copy of these resolutions shall be in- 
corporated in every publication issued under this foundation. 

"The right to make all necessary regulations, not inconsistent 
with the spirit and letter of these resolutions, is given to the Chan- 
cellor and Faculty, but no changes in the conditions of the founda- 
tion can be made without the mutual consent of both the Trustees 
of the University and of the Phelps-Stokes Fund." 

OPPORTUNITIES FOR SELF-HELP 

77. A considerable number of students secure remunerative em- 
ployment to aid them in their education. Usually the students of 
Agriculture are able to secure work on the farm for which they are 
paid. In a few instances other departments need the services of 
students. Usually these places go to those who have been in attend- 
ance for some time, and who are known to be willing, capable, and 
trustworthy. The University does not assume any responsibility 
whatever in this matter. As a matter of accommodation the Com- 
mittee on Self-Help cooperate as far as possible with students. The 
Y. M. C. A. offers its services in helping young men to secure em- 
ployment. Very much depends, however, on the individual's power 
of initiative. Students should not come to the University expecting 
others to find places for them. 

It seems necessary to warn students on this subject. The average 
young man cannot ordinarily do much more than earn his living 
when he has nothing else to do. To earn a living and at the same 
time carry the work of a college course planned to occupy a student's 
full time is more than most students can accomplish. In a few 
instances they have succeeded, but as a rule students who attempt 
more than partial self-support should expect to lengthen their term 
of study. 

DISCIPLINE AND GENERAL REGULATIONS 

78. The discipline of the colleges at Athens is in the hands of the 
Chancellor of the University, who in its administration may ask 
advice of the Faculty. The honor system prevails and formal regu- 
lations are few and general in character. 

The State of Georgia extends the privileges of the University to 
all persons who are qualified for admission. Thus the University 



46 UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

does not receive patronage, but is itself the patron of those who 
seek its privileges and honors. It is maintained at public expense 
for the public good. It cannot, however, be the patron of inefficiency, 
idleness, or dissipation. Its classes have no room except for those 
who diligently pursue the studies of their choice and are willing to 
be governed in their conduct by the rules of propriety. Every 
student owes to the public a full equivalent of expenditures in his 
behalf, both while in the institution and afterwards. 

The Registrar's books will be open Monday, Sept. 15th, and the 
following rule has been passed by the Board of Trustees relative to 
registration: 

80. All students registering after Saturday noon following the 
Wednesday on which the University opens shall pay an extra regis- 
tration fee of $2.50, unless excused from the payment of the same 
by the Chancellor. 

81. The annual session of the University is divided into three 
terms, as follows: 

First Term — From the opening in September to the beginning 
of the Christmas vacation. 

Second Term — Beginning at the close of the Christmas vacation 
and extending to and including the third Saturday in March. 

Third Term — Beginning at the close of the second term and ex- 
tending to and including the Friday before Commencement Day. 

82. At the end of and within each term a sufficient number of 
days is set apart for term examinations, two examinations, of not 
more than three hours duration each, being given on each day, and 
the examinations for the Senior classes at the end of the third term 
conclude on the Wednesday preceding Commencement Day. 

83. The term examinations of any session will be open to students 
who may have failed in the examinations of preceding sessions. 

84. No other examinations (except the regular entrance exami- 
nations) will be authorized by the Faculty or held by the officers 
of instruction, it being understood that this regulation does not 
forbid written tests within the regular class hour, provided the 
preparation for such written tests does not involve neglect of other 
duty. 

85. Five reports of the standing of students are made during the 
session, one at the end of each term, and one each at the middle of 
the first and second terms. 

86. In any one session three marks below "C" or two below "D," 
or as many as three unexcused absences on any term or half-term re- 
port, operate to exclude the recipient from participation in inter- 
collegiate athletics, or musical or dramatic performances, whether 
as player or officer, or in public speaking or debate, until the next 
report. 



UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 4 7 

87. Three marks below "C" or two below "D" on the final report 
exclude the recipient from participation in intercollegiate athletics, 
or musical or dramatic performances, or in public speaking or de- 
bate, during the following session, unless he take over every subject 
in which the failure was made, or remove by examination enough of 
the deficiencies to restore him to eligibility by these regulations. 

8 8. The mark of a student who changes his course after the mid- 
dle of a term is that which he received on the mid-term report. 

89. Students having credit in the Registrar's office for as many as 
twelve session hours shall rank as Sophomores. Those having credit 
in the Registrar's office for as many as thirty session hours shall 
rank as Juniors. Those having credit in the Registrar's office for 
as many as forty-five session hours shall rank as Seniors, provided 
that no member of the Senior class shall be a candidate for gradua- 
tion whose conditions at the beginning of the second term of his 
Senior year shall be in excess of eight hours. Students having credit 
in the Registrar's office for less than twelve session hours shall rank 
as Freshmen. 

90. The annual Commencement exercises are held on the third 
Wednesday in June. Other exercises are held on preceding days, 
and the baccalaureate sermon is preached on the Sunday preceding. 
The summer vacation extends from Commencement Day to the 
third Wednesday in September. During this time, however, the 
Summer Session of the University is held, as indicated in the Calen- 
dar. A short recess is given at Christmas, and national and state 
holidays are observed, as indicated in the Calendar. 

STUDENT ADVISERS 

91. Students are assigned in suitable numbers to the several mem- 
bers of the Faculty for special oversight. In case of any proposed 
change in his course of study, a student must consult his adviser, 
who will judge the reasons for the change and report the case to the 
Dean for final action. 

CHAPEL EXERCISES 

9 2. Chapel exercises, conducted by the Chancellor or some mem- 
ber of the Faculty, are held every morning except Sunday in the 
Chapel. On Sunday the students may attend services in any of the 
Sunday Schools, Churches, and Religious Associations in the city. 
These are as follows: Baptist, Catholic, Christian, Episcopal. Meth- 
odist, Presbyterian, Jewish Synagogue, Young Men's Christian Asso- 
ciation, etc. 

9 3. HONORS AND APPOINTMENTS 

Sophomore Declaimers. In April of each year ten members of the 
Sophomore class are selected to compete for a declamation prize 
offered at Commencement. 



48 UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

Junior Speakers. Six members of the Junior class are selected on 
the basis of original speeches to represent the class at Commence- 
ment. 

Senior Speakers. The Senior class is representee! on Commence- 
ment Day by two orators, the selection being made on the merits of 
original speeches. No student who fails to receive his degree may 
appear among the speakers. 

Speakers from the Law Department. Two members of the Law 
Department are selected by the Faculty to represent that department 
on Commencement Day. 

Valedictorian. At the regular Faculty meeting, on Monday before 
the third Wednesday in May, the Faculty nominates not more than 
five members of the Senior class who stand first in scholarship. The 
names are submitted in alphabetical order to the Senior class, and 
they elect from them a valedictorian, with the understanding that 
he shall maintain his standing in scholarship but need not be the 
first honor man. 

No student is allowed to appear at Commencement either as speak- 
er or declaimer who is not a member in good and full standing of 
one of the literary societies, and who has not taken instruction in 
declamation in this or some other institution — in either event to the 
satisfaction of the Professor of English. 

The Debaters' Medals. Six gold medals are offered by the Board 
of Trustees, to be awarded as prizes to members of the Freshman 
and Sophomore classes for excellence in debating. A medal is 
awarded to each of the debaters representing the Literary Society 
which wins a debate. 

The Ready Writers' Medal. To encourage the art of composition, 
the Board of Trustees award a gold medal for the best essay written 
by any student of the University upon a theme announced after the 
competitors enter the room. 

The Willcox Prizes. Two prizes, in French and German, of 
$50.00 (gold) each, have been offered for competition in the Senior 
class in French and in German. These prizes were founded in 1896 
as a memorial to their lamented father, by the sons of the late 
Prof. Cyprian Porter Willcox, A.M., LL.D., who, from 1872 until 
his death in 1895, filled with great distinction the chair of Modern 
Languages in the University. In 1918 the prize in German was 
discontinued. 

The Freshman Prize. The "Hamilton McWhorter Prize," as of 
the class of 1875, for general excellence in the Freshman class, is 
awarded to the member of that class who stands first in scholarship. 

The Bryan Prize. The Hon. W. J. Bryan has donated the sum 
of two hundred and fifty dollars, the income of which is given an- 



UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 49 

nually as a prize to the writer of the best essay on our form of gov- 
ernment. 

The Peabody Scholarship. In 1903 Mr. George Foster Peabody 
established a permanent scholarship in Harvard University for the 
benefit of a graduate of this institution. The appointment is made 
annually by the Chancellor. 

The Philosophy Prize. Two prizes of fifty dollars each were 
founded in 1902 by Judge Horace Russell, of New York. These 
prizes, named by the Board of Trustees the "Horace Russell Prize 
in Psychology," and the "Walter B. Hill Prize in Ethics," are award- 
ed to the writers of the best essays on subjects assigned by the 
Professor of Philosophy. 

The Cadet Prize. A prize is annually awarded to the best drilled 
cadet in the Corps in a competitive contest held during Commence- 
ment. 

The R. E. Park, Jr., Prize. Prof. R. E. Park, Jr., offers a gold 
medal for the best oration by a member of the Junior class. 

The L. H. Charboimier Prize. A prize of a fine set of drawing in- 
struments is offered by Mrs. Jas. F. Gowan, of Augusta, in honor of 
her father, who for more than thirty years served the University 
with distinction as Professor of Engineering, Commandant of Cadets 
and Professor of Physics and Astronomy. This prize will be given 
to the member of the graduating class whose record in the school of 
Physics has been most creditable. 

The College of Agriculture Prize. The Trustees offer a prize of 
twenty-five dollars in gold to the student in Agriculture writing the 
best essay on a subject assigned by the professors of agriculture. 
Other prizes offered to students in Agriculture are described in the 
statement of the College of Agriculture. 

PUBLICATIONS OF THE UNIVERSITY 

94. Bulletin of The University of Georgia. Under this general 
title the University issues a monthly publication, which is sent to 
regular mailing lists or may be had upon application to the Uni- 
versity. 

This includes the Register, the General Catalogue of the Univer- 
sity system, announcements of the Summer Session, the Law Depart- 
ment, the School of Pharmacy, the Graduate School, the Peabody 
School of Education, the School of Commerce, the Summer Coaching 
School, the Alumni Number, the Catalogue of Trustees, Officers and 
Alumni, and several numbers of a scientific and literary nature. 

University Items, a news letter, issued fortnightly during the 
session. 

From the College of Agriculture are issued: 

Bulletins of Farmers' Institutes, President Soule, Editor. 



50 UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

Bulletins of the Experiment Station, Director H. P. Stuckey, 
Editor, Experiment, Ga. 

Bulletins of the College of Agriculture. 

85. The publications conducted by the students include: 

The Red and Black, a weekly now in its twenty-fourth volume, 
the organ of the Athletic Association. 

The Georgian, a monthly literary magazine. 

The Pandora, an illustrated annual of college life, issued by the 
Senior class. 

The University Handbook, issued by the Y. M. C. A. 

The Engineering Annual, now in its nineteenth volume, issued by 
the Engineering Society. 

The Agricultural Quarterly, published quarterly by the Agricul- 
tural Club. 

LITERARY SOCIETIES 

96. The Demosthenian Society was founded in 1801, and the Phi 
Kappa Literary Society in 1820. The members of the societies meet 
in their respective halls every Wednesday evening at 8 o'clock. 

On the evening of February 20th these Societies celebrate to- 
gether, with public exercises, the anniversary of their founding. 

Under the auspices of the Literary Societies intercollegiate de- 
bates are held annually. 

A Champion Debate between the two literary societies is held on 
the Monday evening of Commencement week. 

STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS 

97. The College Young Men's Christian Association holds weekly 
meetings which are addressed by local or visiting ministers, or by 
members of the Faculty; prayer-meetings are also held daily. 

The Association has its own secretary, whose time is devoted to 
this work. Attractive reading rooms, containing the current period- 
icals, are open to all students. The Association also conducts an 
employment bureau and is of service in arranging boarding places 
for new students. At the opening of each session, a mass meeting 
which is largely attended, is held under its auspices. 

The Engineering Society was organized in 1889. Its object is 
to create an interest among the students in matters pertaining to 
civil, electrical, and architectural engineering, and recent develop- 
ment along all lines of scientific research. The society holds fort- 
nightly meetings during the session, at which papers are read and 
lectures delivered. The society publishes in June the "Engineering 
Annual." 

99. The Athletic Association is a student organization for the 
encouragement and management of athletic sports. Football, bas- 
ketball, baseball, and track teams are regularly organized. Subject 



UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 51 

to the general direction of the Faculty Chairman, the management 
of the athletic activities of the University is delegated to the Ath- 
letic Association. 

100. The Agricultural Club was organized in 1906. Its object is 
to create and promote interest among the students in matters per- 
taining to agriculture and allied sciences. It holds regular meetings 
and publishes a quarterly magazine called the "Agricultural Quar- 
terly." 

101. Other student organizations are the Press Club, the Glee 
Club, the College Orchestra, and the Thalian Dramatic Association. 

102. Regulations concerning student organizations and publica- 
tions may be had on application to the Chancellor's office. 

SOCIETY OF AliUMNI 

This society is composed of graduates of the University, and has 
for its object the promotion of letters and science, as well as the 
annual renewal of the associations of academic life. It holds its 
meetings at the close of each session, when an orator is appointed 
by the society from among its members. The oration is delivered 
on Tuesday during Commencement. 

The officers of the organization are: 

Clark Howell President 

T. J. Shackelford First Vice-President 

W. A. Harris Second Vice-President 

D. S. Atkinson Third Vice-President 

C. M. Strahan Treasurer 

W. O. Payne Assistant Treasurer 

Sylvanus Morris Secretary 

Land Trustees 

D. C. Barrow. 
T. J. Shackelford. 
Harry Hodgson. 

These Trustees, appointed by the Society, are charged with the 
duty of purchasing additions to the campus and conveying these 
parcels of land to the Trustees of the University. 



52 UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

FRANKLIN COLLEGE 

THE COLLEGE OF ARTS 



STAFF OF INSTRUCTION 



D. C. BARROW, LL.D., Chancellor. 

C. M. SNELLING, Sc.D., President, and Professor of Mathematics. 



H. C. WHITE, Ph.D., Sc.D., D.C.L., LL.D., Professor of Chemistry, 
and Terrell Professor of Agricultural Chemistry. 

W. H. BOCOCK, LL.D., Milledge Professor of Ancient Languages. 

J. H. T. McPHERSON, Ph.D., Professor of History and Political 
Science. 

W. D. HOOPER, A.M., Professor of Latin. 

J. MORRIS, A.M., Professor of Germanic Languages. 

J. LUSTRAT, Bach es Lett., Professor of Romance Languages. 

R. E. PARK, A.M., Litt.D., Professor of English. 

T. J. WOOFTER, Ph.D., Professor of Philosophy and Education. 

J. S. STEWART, Ped.D., Professor of Secondary Education. 

S. V. SANFORD, Litt.D., Professor of English Language. 

L. L. HENDREN, Ph.D., Professor of Physics and Astronomy. 

J. M. READE, Ph.D., Professor of Botany. 

R. P. BROOKS, Ph.D., DeRenne Professor of Georgia History. 

C. J. HEATWOLE, M.S., Professor of Education. 

W. 0. PAYNE, A.M., Associate Professor of History and Political 
Science. 

R. P. STEPHENS, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Mathematics. 

H. V. BLACK, Ph.D., Associate Professor &f Chemistry. 

*A. S. EDWARDS, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Psychology. 

R. L. McWHORTER, A.M., Adjunct Professor of Latin an4 Greek. 

R. S. POND, Ph.D., Adjunct Professor of Mathematics. 

*R. P. WALKER, A.M., Adjunct Professor of English. 

H. D. DOZIER, A.M., Professor of Finance. 

*G. L. WILLIAMS, A.M., Adjunct Professor of Finance. 

*E. E. PEACOCK, M.B.A., Instructor in Accounting and Industry. 

W. C. GEORGE, Ph.D., Adjunct Professor of Zoology. 

R. W. RAMIREZ, A.B., Adjunct Professor of Romance Languages. 

W. T. WRIGHT, M.S., Adjunct Professor Physics. 

S. M. SALYER, A.M., Adjunct Professor of English. 



* In the Government service. 






FRANKLIN COLLEGE 5 3 

ENTRANCE SUBJECTS 

The following subjects are required for admission to Franklin 
College: English, History, Plane Geometry, High School Algebra, 
Latin, and Greek or French or German or Spanish. (For details as 
•to subjects and methods of admission, see pages 244ff. ) 

For admission to the Sophomore Class, the student must offer in 
addition to the subjects mentioned above, the equivalent of the 
courses in Mathematics, Latin, English, History, and Greek or 
French or German pursued by the Freshman Class and given in the 
table below. In this table the figure attached to the name of the 
subject refers to the course described under that number in the 
detailed account of the courses offered in that school. Thus, 
"English 1" in the table below means the course in Composition 
and Rhetoric described- in the staement of the School of English 
on page 60. The figures at the end of the line means the number 
of recitation hours per week in that course. 

The undergraduate degrees given in Franklin College are those 
of Bachelor of Arts, Bachelor of Arts in Social Science, and Bach- 
elor of Journalism. Options in the Junior and Senior classes must 
be selected after conference with and with the consent of the Pres- 
ident of the College. 

BACHELOR OF ARTS 

The subjects entering into the course for this degree are given 
below: 

Freshman Hrs. Sophomores Hrs. 

English 1, p. 60 3 English 2, p. 60 3 

Greek 1, p. 62 4 Greek 2, p. 62; or French* 2, 

Oi' p. 72; or German* 2, p. 62, 

French 1*, p. 72 or German 1* or Spanish 2, p. 73 _ _ _ _ 3 

p. 62 or Spanish 1, p. 73 _ 3 History 4, p. 64 3 

Georgia History, p. 64 1 Latin 2, p. 66 ________ 3 

History 2f, p. 63 3 Mathematics 3, 4, p. 67 3 

Latin 1, p. 66 4 Physics 2**, p. 69 3 

Mathematics 1, 2, p. 66 _ _ _ 3 

Military Science 1, p. 6 8 _ _ 1 

18 18 

*If Greek 1 and 2 are omitted, two years in each of two modern 
languages must be taken. The second language will be taken in 
addition to the five required Junior subjects, and among the five 
required Senior subjects. (French la, German la and Spanish la 
thus offered will satisfy the requirements of Group I in the Junior 
year). 

■{•Candidates taking Greek X will not be required to take History 2. 

**And one laboratory period. 



54 



UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 



Junior 



I. 



II. 



III. 



1 



\ English Lang. 1, p. 61 

I French Iff, p. 72 

German Iff, p. 6 2 _ _ 
Spanish Iff, p. 73 _ _ 
Greek 3, p. 63 _ _ _ 
Latin 3, p. 66 _ _ _ 
History 5-6, p. 64 _ _ 
Economics 5, p. 62 _ 
Philosophy 3, 4, p. 71 
Botany 3*, p. 58 _ _ 

Zoology 3*, p. 58 

\ Chemistry 2, p. 59 _ 

| Phys. 4* or 5*, p. 69 

[Psychol. 5*, p. 70 _ 

English 3, 4, 6, or 

11, p. 60 

Journalism 1, 2, 

p. 65 

Greek Xff or Xb, 

p. 62 _____ _ 

History 8-9, or 13, or 

14, p. 64 

Government 11, 12, 

p. 64 

History 10, p. 64 _ 
Economics 6, 7, or 

8, 9, or 10-14, or 

11-15, or 16, p 
Psychology 1, 2, 

p. 70 _ __3 

Education 1-2, 5-6, 

10, 12, p. 71 3 

Mathematics 5 or 4a, 

6, p. 67 3 

Italian 1, p. 73 _ _ 3 
Law 1, p. 55 _ _ _ _ 3 

Five subjects must be taken. 

Senior 



\ One required. 



V One required. 






j One required; two may be taken. 



60 3 






{ English Lang. 2, p. 61 
j French 2a, p. 72 _ _ 

I. I German 2a, p. 62 

Spanish 2<t, p. 73 _ _ 

Latin 4, p. 66 

Greek 3 or 4, p. 6 3 _ 
His. 8-9, or 13-14, 64 
Gov'm't 11, 12, p. 64 

II. | Econ. 5, p. 60 

Philosophy 3-4, p. 71 
Sociology 5-6, 9, p. 71 
f Bot.* 3, 4, 9, or 11, 

p. 58 

Zoology 3, 4, 5, p. 58 
III. { Chem. 2, 3, 4, 5, or 

8, p. 59 _ _ _ _ _ 
Phvsics* 4, 5, or 6, 

p. 69 

Pcy.* 5 or 6, p. 7 _ 



One required. 



One required. 



One required; two may be taken 



And one laboratory period. 



FRANKLIN COLLEGE 15 

Astronomy and Geology, p. 69 3 

English 3, 4, 5, 6 or 11, p. 60 3 " 

English Language 1, p. 61 _ 3 

Journalism 3, 4, 5, 6, p. 65 _ 3 

History 5-6, or 8-9, p. 64 _ _ 3 
Economics 6, 7, 8, or 9, or 10, 

11 or 11-15, or 16, p. 60 _ _ 3 

French Language, p. 72 _ _ _ 3 

Spanish Language, p. 73 _ _ 3 

Latin 3, p. 66 3 

Greek Xa or X6, p. 6 3 3 

German Language, p. 62 _ _ 3 
Mathematics 5, or any two of 

7, 8, 9, p. 67 3 

Newspaper writing, p. 65 _ _ 3 

Education 3, 7, p. 71 _ _ _ _ 3 

Education 4-8, 5-6, 9-10, p. 71 3 

Psychology 3a, b, c, p. 70 _ _ 3 

Law, p. 5 5 __________ 3 

♦And one laboratory period. 

Five subjects must be taken. 

Note: — No student may take more than nine hours in one year 
from the courses in Psychology, Philosophy, and Education. 

Six hours of academic credit are allowed for studies in the Law 
School taken in the Junior and Senior years of the Bachelor of Art* 
course. The law courses designated are: 

Law 1, consisting of 1, Elementary Law. 

a. Blackstone 1, 2, 3. 

b. American Elementary Law. 

2. Torts. 

3. Criminal Law. 
Counting four hours. 

Law 2, consisting of 1, Constitutional Law. 

2. Contracts. 

3. Sales. 

4. Bailments. 
Counting two hours. 

BACHELOR OF ARTS IN THE SOCIAL SCIENCES 

Requirements for Degrer 

Latin 1; Latin 2 or Mathematics 3-4. Mathematics 1-2; Mathe- 
matics 3-4 or Latin 2. In one other foreign language, 6 hours. 
History, 3 hours; Georgia History, 1 hour; English, 3 hours; Na- 
tural Science, 6 hours; Military, 3 hours. 

With major in Philosophical-Social Science: History-Political 



56 UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

Science, 9 hours; Education, 6 hours; Philosophical-Social Science, 
12 hours. 

With major in History-Political Science: Philosophical-Social 
Science, 9 hours; Education, 3 hours; Economics, 3 hours; History- 
Political Science, 12 hours. 

With major in Education: History-Political Science, 9 hours; 
Philosophical-Social Science, 6 hours; Education, 12 hours. 

Total requirements, 66 hours, or 6 3 when Greek is taken as the 
language elective. 

Freshman Hrs. Sophomore Hrs. 

Latin 1, p. 66 3 Latin 2; or Math. 3-4, p. 67 _ 3 

Greek, p. 62; or French, p. Greek, p. 62; or French, p. 

72; or German, p. 62; or 72; or German, p. 63; or 

Spanish, p. 73 3 Spanish, p. 73______3 

Mathematics 1-2, p. 66 3 Physics, Chemistry, Biology, 

English 1, p. 60 ______ _ 3 Botany (in each of two) _ 6 

History, p. 63 3 Psychology, p. 70 3 

Georgia History, p. 64 _ _ _ 1 Elective _________3 

Military Science, p. 68 _ _ _ _ 1 

Note: — This statement of hours has reference to work in the 
University or in instiutionns accredited for advanced standing. 

Junior and Senior 

The remainder of the courses included in the requirements with 
additional elective courses to complete the total of hours. 

With the major in Philosophical-Social Science or in Education 
the courses must be selected under the direction and with the ap- 
proval of the Dean of Education. 

With the major in History-Political Science, the courses must be 
selected under the direction and with the approval of the head of 
this department. 

Students coming from other colleges with 30 hours to their credit 
may enter with Senior college standing, but 36 hours of credit will 
be necessary for full Senior college rating. 

BACHELOR OF JOURNALISM 

Requirements for Achnission: The requirements for admission 
to the School of Journalism are (1) identical with those required 
for the A.B. or B.S. degrees, and (2) the satisfactory completion of 
the first two years' work of the A.B. or B.S. (General) or the B.S. 
(Commerce). 

Special Students: Students more than 21 years old may be ad- 
mitted to the School of Journalism, at the discretion of the Dean 
of the University, without having met the entrance requirements. 
No special student may become a candidate for the degree until he 



FRANKLIN COLLEGE 



57 



satisfies the full entrance requirements as specified for this school. 

The Degree: The degree of Bachelor of Journalism will be given 
upon the satisfactory completion of the four-year course outlined 
below. 

Students who can afford the time are strongly advised to take 
the five-year course, the A.B. combined with the Bachelor of 
Journalism. 

Requirements for Graduation: 

1. He must satisfy the full entrance requirements for the A.B. 
or B.S. (General) degree. 

2. He must complete the first two years' work of 3 6 hours 
required for the A.B. degree, or the 3 7 hours required for 
the B.S. (General) or the B.S. (Commerce) degree. 

3. He must complete at least a major of fifteen hours in 
Journalism. 

4. He must complete a total of 72 hours. 

3. He must be able to read a French, German, or Spanish 
newspaper. 

Courses of Study 

In addition to the first two years' work required for the A.B. or 
the B.S. (General) or the B.S. (Commerce) degrees, the subjects 
entering into this course for the degree of Bachelor of Journalism 
are given below: 



Junior 



Journalism 1 
Journalism 2 
History 5-6 
German la 
French la 
Spanish 1 
Philosophy 3-4 
Psychology 1 or 5 
Sociology 9 
Education 5-6 
Economics 5 
Bnglish 3, 4, 6, 9 or 11 
English Language 1 
Natural Science 



hours 
hours 
hours 
hours 
hours 
hours 
hours 
hours 
hours 
hours 
hours 
hours 
hours 
hours 



Three required 



One required 



Two required 



58 



UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 



Senior 



Journalism 3 
Journalism 4-5 
Journalism 6-7 
Political Science 11-2 
German 2« 
French 2u 
Spanish 2 
Philosophy 3-4 
Psychology 5 or 1 
Sociology 9 
Education 5-6 
Economics 5, 6-7, or 8-9 
English 3, 4, 5, 6, 9 or 11 
English Language 1 or 2 
Natural Science 
Agriculture 



hours 
hours 
hours 
hours 
hours 
hours 
3 hours 
3 hours | 
hours 
hours 
hours 
hours 
hours 
hours 
hours 
hours J 



Four required 



One required 



Three required 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 



BIOLOGY 

Botany 

J. M. READE, Professor. 
W. C. WANG, Assistant. 

*3. Introductory Plant Biology. This is the complement of 
Zoology 3, the two courses together constituting General Biology. 
Three recitations and two hours of laboratory work per week for 
three terms. Prerequisite for Botany 4, 5, 6, 9, and 11. 

4. Morphology. A comparative study in particular of the groups 
leading to a land flora. Two recitations and four hours of labor- 
atory work per week for three terms. Botany 3 is prerequisite. 

9. Physiology. Experiment and connected assigned reading. Six 
hours laboratory work and one conference hour per week for three 
terms. Botany 3 is prerequisite. 

11. Genetics. An introduction to the study of heredity. Three 
lectures or recitations per week for three terms. Botany 3 is pre- 
requisite. 

ZOOLOGY 

W. C. GEORGE, Adjunct Professor. 

■ , Assistant. 

The following courses are offered: 

3. Introductory Animal Biology. This is the complement of Bot- 
any 3, the two courses together constituting General Biology. Three 
recitations and two hours laboratory work per week for three weeks. 
Prerequisite to Zoology 4 and 5. 



* Offered also in the Summer Session, 1919, 



FRANKLIN COLLEGE 59 

4. Vertebrate Morphology. The various organ systems are stud- 
ied in detail, especial attention being given to the homologies found 
in the various vertebrate groups. Three recitations and two hours 
laboratory work per week for three terms. Prerequisite, Zoology 3. 

5. Histology and Embryology. The first two terms are devoted to 
practice in the general methods employed in making microscopical 
preparations and to a study of the histological structure of the more 
important types of tissues and organs; the third term is devoted to 
the embryology of the frog and chick. Two recitations and at least 
four hours of laboratory work per week. Prerequisite. Zoology 3. 

A. The Human Body. An introductory course for those not suf- 
ficiently prepared to enter Zoology 3. Three recitations or lectures 
per week for three terms. 

CHEMISTRY 

H. C. WHITE, Professor. 

H. V. BLACK, Associate Professor. 

C. B. SWETLAND, Instructor. 

The following courses are offered: 

2. Inorganic Chemistry, College Course. Three hours per week 
of lectures and recitations for three terms. Text: Alexander Smith, 
General Chemistry. 

2a. Laboratory Course, to accompany Course 2. Two laboratory 
periods per week for three terms. 

2b. A more extensive laboratory course, also to accompany Course 
2. Four laboratory periods per week for three terms. 

3. Organic Chemistry. Three hours per week of lectures and 
recitations and two laboratory periods per week for three terms. 
Open to students who have completed Courses 2 and 2u or 2 and 2b. 
Text: Stoddard, Introduction to Organic Chemistry. 

4. Industrial (Including Agricultural) Chemistry. Three hours 
per week of lectures and recitation for three terms. Texts: Pro- 
fessor's Notes; Thorp, Industrial Chemistry; and Reference texts. 

5. Physical Chemistry. Three hours per week of lectures and 
recitations and two laboratory periods for three terms. Open to 
students who have completed Courses 2 and 2n or 2 and 2b. 

8. Analytical Chemistry. About two-thirds of this course is de- 
voted to qualitative analysis, on the completion of which quanti- 
tative analysis is begun. Six laboratory periods per week for three 
terms. Open to students who have completed Courses 2 and 2'/ or 
2 and 2b. Texts: W. A. Noyes, Qualitative Analysis; Morse, Exer- 
cises in Quantitative Chemistry. 

A fee of $2.50 is charged for chemicals used in Courses 2'/. 2/>. 3. 
and 5. Necessary apparatus is furnished students and breakage 
must be paid for at the end of the course. 



60 UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

ECONOMICS AND BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

For courses see the announcement of the School of Commerce. 

ENGLISH 

R. E. PARK, Professor. 
S. M. SALYER, Assistant Professor. 
R. P. WALKER, Adjunct Professor. 
S. V. SANFORD, Professor of English Language. 

A. The Elements of English. Business correspondence, a review 
of grammar, composition writing and the reading of selected classics. 
Required of one year students in Agriculture who are not eligible 
to enter English 1. Three hours a week. 

1. Rhetoric. (a) A study of the fundamental principles of 
rhetoric; (b) their application to the problems of composition and 
themes; (c) their application to the interpretation of literature. 
Weekly. Required of Freshmen. Three hours a week. Professor 
Park, Adjunct Professor Salyer. 

2. English Literature. The principles of literary criticism and 
the practical application of these principles to masterpieces studied 
with reference to (a) elements of literature; (b) species of litera- 
ture; (c) historical development. The object of this course is to 
give to the student a general view of the history and development 
of English literature, with detailed knowledge of certain periods. 
Throughout the course much attention will be devoted to 'the writing 
of essays as a means of training the student to appreciate and to 
express his appreciation of the literature studied. Required of 
Sophomores. Three hours a week. Professor Parle, Adjunct Professor 
Salyer. 

3. American Literature. This course attempts to give a compre- 
hensive account of American literature. The leading writers in 
prose and poetry are considered, first as to their intrinsic worth, 
and secondly, as illustrative of the national development. The third 
term will be devoted to the literature of Georgia. Optional for 
Juniors and Seniors. Three hours a week. (Omitted in 1917-1918). 
Professor San ford. 

4. The Novel. The development of the novel in English. The 
study of representative novels of Richardson, Fielding, Bronte, 
Austen, Scott, Dickens, Thackeray, Eliot, Stevenson, Hardy, Kipling, 
De Morgan, Cooper, Hawthorne, Howells, Allen, Fox, Churchill. 
Frequent writing of brief papers on subjects involving collateral 
readings in the authors discussed. Optional for Juniors and Seniors. 
Three hours a week. Professor Sanford. 

5. The English Drama. Specimens of the pre-Shakespearean 
drama and the study of selected plays from Marlowe to the present 
time. Papers on the sources, structure and literary qualities of the 



FRANKLIN COLLEGE 61 

plays studied. Optional for Seniors. Three hours a week. Professor 
Park. 

6. The Short Story and the English Essay. The great essay writ- 
ers of the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries will be studied dur- 
ing the first half of this course. The second half-year will be de- 
voted to the study of the short story, with especial reference to 
structure. Optional for Juniors and Seniors. Three hours a week. 
Professor Park. 

9. The Chief English Poets of the Nineteenth Century, Words- 
worth, Coleridge, Byron, Shelley, Keats, Arnold, Tennyson, Brown- 
ing. The course consists in the study of the principal works of these 
poets, the collateral reading of a considerable body of biography and 
criticism, and the writing at frequent intervals of brief critical pa- 
pers. Optional for Juniors and Seniors. Three hours a week. 
(Omitted in 1918-1919). Adjunct Professor Salyer. 

11. Shakespeare. The best of the works of Shakespeare will be 
studied, with sidelights upon the life of the Elizabethans. King 
Lear will be studied minutely. Adjunct Professor Salyer. 

ENGLISH LANGUAGE 

1. Anglo-Saxon. Phonology, Inflections, and Translation. Text- 
books: Smith's Old English Grammar, and Bright's Anglo-Saxon 
Reader. Three hours a week. Optional for Juniors. Professor 
s tin ford. 

2. Middle English. Chaucer's Prologue and Knight's Tale, with 
lectures based on ten Brink's "Chaucer's Sprache und Verskunst," 
and Morris's "Organic History of English Words," Part II. Three 
hours a week. Optional for Seniors. Professor sanford. 

3. Old English Epic Poetry, Gothic and Comparative Grammar. 
Text-books: Wyatt's Beowulf, Wright's Gothic Primer. Lectures 
based on Streitberg's "Urgermanische Grammatik." Graduate 
Course. Professor Morris. 

4. English Syntax. This course will deal with the structure of 
the English sentence. Optional for Juniors and Seniors. Three 
hours a week. Professor Sanford. 

5. Historical English Syntax. Graduate Course. Profesi <anford. 

PUBLIC SPEAKING 
At present there are held four intercollegiate debates, two inter- 
society debates, two class debates, a Sophomore declamation contest, 
a Junior oratorical contest, a Senior oratorical contest, and the 
anniversarian contests in the two literary societies. All candidates 
for places in these contests are supervised in the preparation and 
instructed in the delivery of their speeches by the Department of 
English. 



62 UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

GEOLOGY 

Vacant.* 
1. General Geology. Three hours per week, second half-year. 
The course of instruction is at first a general one, embracing the 
study of the distinguishing properties of minerals and common 
rocks, the decay of rocks, and the formation of soils. Following 
this is a more extended course of Structural, Dynamical, and Histor- 
ical Geology. 

GERMANIC LANGUAGES 

JOHN MORRIS, Professor. 

1. German X is a course for beginners who are conditioned in 
German such as is described in detail at page 35. Three hours per 
week. Professor Morris. 

2. German 1. Method-book completed; translation of about 200 
pages of modern narrative prose. Three hours per week. Optional 
for Freshmen. Professor Morris. 

3. German 2 presents a course in conversation and sight reading 
with the object of giving a practical mastery of the language. Three 
hours per week. Optional for Sophomores. Professor Morris. 

4. German la is an elementary course offered as one of the Junior 
language options. After an oral introduction of several weeks, given 
exclusively in German, the class takes up a method-book and works 
carefully through all the exercises. Three hours per week. Optional 
for Juniors. Professor Morris. 

5. German "In is a continuation o,f the preceding course. The class 
translates about 600 pages of prose texts. Some of this work is done 
outside of the class room, but a careful examination is held on each 
book when completed. Practice in speaking German continues 
throughout the year. Three hours per week. Optional for Seniors. 
Professor Morris. 

GREEK 
W. H. BOCOCK, Professor. 
R. L. McWHORTER, Adjunct Professor. 

The standard of this School depends largely upon the character 
of work done in the preparatory schools of Georgia. The require- 
ments for admission, given elsewhere, are based directly upon that 
work. With this basis, the guiding principles of the courses given 
to the lower classes are the early mastery of the forms, a minimum 
of syntax, the reading of the language in mass as rapidly as is con- 
sistent with thoroughness. 

In the higher classes the standard syntax of Attic prose is treated 
systematically, and the attempt is made to introduce the student to 



* Temporarily in charge of the Professor of Chemistry. 



FRANKLIN COLLEGE 63 

an appreciation of the artistic forms of Greek literature. There is 
in all classes some practice in reading at sight. Exercises are given 
in translating from English into Greek, both in order to sharpen 
observation of the Greek read, and as an indispensable aid to exact 
scholarship. Lectures on Metres are given in connection with the 
reading of the poets, with practice in the recitation of the Dactylic 
Hexameter, the Iambic Trimeter, and other common verse-forms. 

For the study of geography and history, and for the archaelog- 
ical illustration of the authors read, the lecture-room and library are 
provided with a small collection of books, maps and photographs. 

Xr//>. For beginners. See requirements for entrance, page 34). 
((/) Grammar, (b) Xenophon's Anabasis, Books I, II, III. Six hours 
a week. Professor Bocock. 

X/;. Xenophon's Anabasis, Books I, II, III, with grammatical re- 
view. Three hours a week. Adjunct Profesosr McWhorter. 

X.C. Xenophon's Anabasis, Book III, with grammatical review. 
Three hours a week for the first term. Adjunct Professor McWhorter. 

(For other elementary courses see special Bulletin of the Summer 
School). 

1. Xenophon's Hellenica. Homer, Iliad or Odyssey. Geography 
of Hellas. Four hours a week. Required unless French and Ger- 
man be substituted. Professor Bocock and Adjunct Professor McWhorter. 

2. Selections (varying from year to year) from Homer, Herodotus, 
Lysias. History of Literature. Three hours a week. Required 
unless French and German be substituted. Professor Bdcock. 

3. Introduction to the study of Greek Tragedy; Euripedes. Selec- 
tions from Plato. History of the Literature. Three hours a week. 
Optional for Juniors or Seniors. Professor Bocock. 

4. Selections from the Tragic Poets, Thucydides, Plato, Demos- 
thenes. Three hours a week. Optional for Seniors. Professor 
Bocock and Adjunct Professor McWhorter. 

5. Selections from the New Testament. Hours to be arranged. 
Optional. Professor Bocock. 

A major course is offered in the Graduate School. 

HISTORY AND POLITICAL SCIENCE 

J. H. T. McPHERSON. Professor. 
W. O. PAYNE, Associate Professor. 
R. P. BROOKS, DeRenne Professor of Georgia History. 

*2. Modem European History. An introductory course, beginning 
with a study of the ancient regime and coming down to the present 
day. Freshmen. Three hours, first and second terms. Professors 
Mcpherson, Payne and Brooks. 



* Given in the Summer Session, 1919. 



6 4 UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

26. American Government. A brief course covering the frame- 
work of the national and state governments, political machinery, 
such as parties, conventions and primaries, and related subjects. 
Freshmen. Three hours, third term. Professors McPherson, Payne 
and Brooks. 

3. History of Georgia. An elementary course, covering the his- 
tory of the state from the beginning. Freshmen. Two hours, sec- 
ond half year. Professor Brooks. 

4. English History. Emphasis is laid on the development of Par- 
liament, the Cabinet, and the various phases of local government. 
Contemporary European developments are kept constantly in view. 
Sophomores. Three hours, throughout the year. Professor Payne. 

\a. Industrial History of Europe. A survey of modern European 
economic history, agricultural, commercial and industrial. Sopho- 
mores in B.S. Agriculture and B.S. Commerce. Three hours, through- 
out the year. Professor Payne. 

*5. American Political History. A general course covering the 
political history of the United States. Juniors and Seniors. Three 
hours, first and second terms. Professor McPherson. 

*6. American Constitutional History. An historical and interpre- 
tative study of the origin and growth of the American Federal and 
State Constitutions. Juniors and Seniors. Three hours, third term. 
Professor McPh erso n . 

8. Modern European History, 1789-1815. After a preliminary 
survey of European conditions on the eve of the French Revolution, 
the progress of events is followed in detail through the Congress of 
Vienna. Juniors and Seniors. Three hours, first half year. Professor 
Payne. 

9. Modern European History, 1815-1918. The political history of 
Europe from the Congress of Vienna through the War of 1914-1918. 
Juniors and Seniors. Three hours, second half year. Professors Payne 
and Brooks. 

11. Political Science. An introduction to the theory of Political 
Science, comprising a study of the origin, nature, organization and 
functions of the state. Juniors and Seniors. Three hours, first 
term. Professor McPherson. 

12. American Government and Politics. An advanced study of 
the American system of Government, Federal, state and local, in- 
cluding the organization and actual influence of political parties. 
Juniors and Seniors. Three hours, second and third terms. Pro- 
fessor McPherson. 

13. American Industrial History. An advanced course, covering 
certain aspects of American economic history, such as the public 



* Offered in the Summer Session, 1919. 



FRANKLIN COLLEGE 65 

land system, slavery, labor problems, currency and banking, tariff 
legislation, and transportation. Juniors and Seniors. Three hours, 
throughout the year. Professor Brooks. This course and History 14 
will be offered in alternate years, American Industrial History being 
omitted in 1919-1920. 

14. American History, 1850-1876. History 14 will be an intensive 
study of some relatively short period of American history. For the 
session 1919-1920 the subject will be Civil War and Reconstruction. 
Especial attention will be given to Southern problems. Juniors and 
Seniors. Three hours, throughout the year. Professor Brooks. 

15. Spanish- American History. This course covers the history, 
geography, political and social institutions, and the economic de- 
velopment and possibilities of Spanish-American countries. Special 
attention is given to international relations, political and economic. 
Three hours. Mr. Ramirez. 

JOURNALISM 
S .V. SANFORD, Profesor. 

1. Newspaper Reporting and Correspondence. The work of the 
reporter and the correspondent, including news gathering and news- 
paper writing; discussions of methods of presentation; writing and 
rewriting from assignments to develop news values. Three hours a 
week, throughout the year. 

2. Newspaper Editing. Practice in editing copy, correcting proof, 
writing headlines, and other details of editing; construction and 
development of various types of the newspaper story. Three hours 
a week, throughout the year. 

3. Special Articles. Practice in writing articles of a varied char- 
acter to suit the miscellaneous needs of a newspaper; personal, nar- 
rative, descriptive; particular attention is given the short story. 
Three hours a week, throughout the year. 

4. Editorial Writing. The theory and practice of editorial writ- 
ing, interpretation and comment; editorial direction and control. 
Three hours a week, first and second terms. 

5. History and Principles of Journalism. Journalism in various 
periods and conditions; the aims of journalism. Three hours a 
week the third term. 

6. Psychology of Business Procedure. A discussion of the mental 
factors involved in problems of advertising. Three hours a week 
the first term. 

7. Newspaper Advertising. Special attention to selling plans and 
special campaigns; preparation of copy, etc. Three hours a week 
the second and third terms. 

8. Agricultural Journalism. A course planned for students of Vo- 
cational Agriculture. It includes a study of rural publicity, report 
writing, press work on projects, and special work in the compilation 



66 UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

and arrangement of statistical data. Required of Senior vocational 
students. Three hours a week. Mr. Maddux. 

LATIN 

W. D. HOOPER, Professor. 

R. L. MeWHORTER, Adjunct Professor. 

1. In addition to the reading of a play of Terence and selections 
from Livy, the syntax is studied formally, and exercises are given 
in translation from English into Latin, to illustrate the usages. 
There is also constant practice in reading at sight. The third term 
is devoted to an introduction to Horace, including the reading of 
the first book of the Odes. Four hours per week. Required of 
Freshmen. Professor Hooper and Adjunct Professor McWhorter. 

2. Horace: selected Odes; Cicero, de Officiis, Book I. Lectures 
on metres are given in connection with the reading of the Odes, and 
practice in metrical reading is constant. There is also practice in 
reading at sight, and written exercises in translation from English 
into Latin are required weekly. Three hours per week. Required 
of Sophomores. Professor Hooper and Adjunct Professor McWhorter. 

3. Horace: selected Satires and Epistles; Tacitus, Annals; Pliny: 
selected letters; History of the Literature. During the first term, 
the Satires and Epistles of Horace are read somewhat more rapidly, 
with more attention to literary quality, and the history of the liter- 
ature is studied. The second and third terms are devoted to the 
Annals of Tacitus, and Pliny's letters. More attention is paid to 
reading at sight, and some of the reading is parallel. Three hours 
per week. Optional for Juniors. Professor Hooper. 

4. Representative plays of Plautus and Terence are read during 
the first term, both in class and in private, and there are lectures 
on the drama. During the second and third terms, the reading is 
chosen from a variety of authors not studied in the lower classes 
Three hours per week. Optional for Seniors. Professor Hooper. 

MATHEMATICS 

C. M. SNELLING, Professor. 

R. P. STEPHENS, Associate Professor. 

R. S. POND, Adjunct Professor. 

F. J. ORR, Special Instructor. 

Of the following, Courses 1, 2, 3, 4 are required of all students 
for graduation with the degree of A B. or B.S. (General). For other 
degrees, see requirements elsewhere. 

*1. Trigonometry. A course in Plane and Spherical Trigonometry. 
Three hours per week for the first half-year. Text: Hun & Mclnnes. 
Professors Rnelling, Stephens and Pond. 



* Offered in the Summer Session, 1919. 



FRANKLIN COLLEGE 67 

*2. Graphical Algebra. This will include a study of coordinates, 
the plotting of curves, and the derivation of the equations of the 
straight line and the circle. Three hours per week for the second 
half year. Professors Knelling, Stephens, and Pond. 

*3. Analysis. The work of Course 2 will be continued by the study 
of the equations of the conies and by introduction to the Calculus. 
Three hours per week for the first half year. Professors Stephens and 
Pond. 

4. Advanced Algebra. The following topics will be treated: com- 
plex numbers, determinants, theory of equations, partial fractions, 
series, and logarithms. Three hours per week for the second half 
year. P?*ofesso?*s Stephens and Pond. 

4«. Insurance. An elementary course in probabilities, series, and 
other topics in algebra and their application in the calculation of 
annuities, premiums, etc. Three hours per week the first half year. 
Required of B.S. (Commerce) Sophomores but optional for others on 
approval of the department. Professsor Stephens. 

5. Calculus. A course in Differential and Integral Calculus. 
Three hours per week throughout the year. Professor Pond. 

6. Statistics. Statistical method and theory; general methods of 
statistical investigation; application of probabilities to statistical 
data; graphical methods of presentation of statistics; correlation; 
variation. Three hours per week, second half-year. Required of 
B.S. (Commerce) Sophomores but optional for others on approval 
of the department. Professor Pond. 

7. Differential Equations. An elementary course in ordinary dif- 
ferential equations. Three hours per week for second half-year. 
Text: Cohen's. Professor Stephens. 

8. Analytic Geometry. An advanced course based on Salmon or 
other text of a similar character. Three hours per week for first 
half-year. Professor Pond. 

9. Theoretical Mechanics. An elementary course. Three hou